Wednesday, September 30, 2015

THE ONLINE BOOKS PAGE

If you like ebooks (and Lord knows I do), you’ll love this site with its listings of over 2 million ebooks (all free!) available on the Web:

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TEACHING WITH PRIMARY SOURCES: THE CONFEDERACY

Online resource sponsored by Eastern Illinois University:

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THE GLAMOROUS STEAMBOAT LIFE

Life on a typical 19th century steamboat was anything but:

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CIVIL WAR TECH

A new educational program aimed at elementary school students will explore the technology of the Civil War era.

The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum in Springfield kicks off the series this weekend. The first "Civil War Tech" event on Saturday will focus on how bugles and drums were used to signal troops in battle.

Other sessions in the series are planned on photography, railroads, submarines, surveillance balloons and hospitals. The program will take place once a month on Saturday mornings. The schedule and ticket information are available on the museum's website.

The Lincoln museum celebrates its 10th anniversary this year. AT&T Inc. is supporting the "Civil War Tech" program.

More info

GERMAN-AMERICAN DAY CELEBRATION

Hallo! I want to invite ALL my friends to German-American Day this Sunday. The only thing more German than an Oktoberfest is a celebration of German-American Day! The Germans of the St. Louis region will celebrate their annual German-American Day (October 6) on Sunday, October 4th, from 1 - 4 p.m. inside the beautiful St. Louis German Cultural Society Hall at 3652 Jefferson Avenue in St. Louis, MO 63118. Free fun and Free Parking! Please share and invite ALL your friends by forwarding this email! Let's celebrate our German Heritage with all of its traditions!

In 1983, President Reagan proclaimed October 6 as German-American Day to celebrate and honor the 300th anniversary of German American immigration to the U.S.. In 1987, Congress approved the National holiday designating October 6 as German-American Day, at which time the President called on Americans to observe the day with appropriate ceremonies and activities. The St. Louis’ German-American Committee will do exactly that and the festivities will begin with St. Louis’ own Honorary German Consul Lansing Hecker. Come and enjoy the wine (Raffle) and beer and pretzels or the Kaffee (free) and Kuchen!

SCHEDULE FOR THE DAY

1:00 Lansing Hecker – Honorary German Counsel will open the festivities!
1:10 Liederkranz (Mixed chorus) will sing
1:20 Joined by the German Cultural Society's Damenchor (Women's Chorus)
1:40 Dammenchor
2:00 St. Charles German Heritage Club* – German Fashion Show
2:30 German Cultural Society's Jugendgruppe (Young people's group) will dance
3:00 Deutscher Mannerchor (Men's Chorus) will sing
3:30 Froehliche Schuhplattler - Dance group will dance

* St. Louis-Stuttgart Sister Cities – Photographic Display of Stuttgart
* Germanic Genealogical Special Interest Group – Genealogical Research
* Stammtisch –– Doing what they do best – talking!
* Badischer Unterstuetzungverein –- History
* Missouri Germans Consortium –Book Signings – Authors Jim Merkel and Dorris Keeven-Franke
* German Cultural Center –– Teacher and Educational Resources
* St. Louis Bosseln League – Demonstrations
* German School Association
* St. Charles – Ludwigsburg Sister City
* Volksmarch
* Schuetzenverein

More information on the web at mo-germans.com

Dorris Keeven-Franke or 636.221.1524

Sunday, September 27, 2015

FACES FROM THE PAST

If you’re having trouble dating any 19th century photos, this video can help you guesstimate the age of five types of 19th century photos:

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CLOUD GENEALOGY: A SHORT GLOSSARY

Short but helpful intro to cloud computing:

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FAST FACTS ABOUT U.S. VETERANS

Interesting, sometimes disheartening facts about our veterans and the care they (sometimes) receive from the DVA:

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Thursday, September 24, 2015

SIX HIDDEN GEMS IN FAMILYSEARCH.ORG

Record sets of interest to persons researching ancestors from China; Mexico; Puerto Rico; plus Confederate Officers Card Index 1861-1865 and U.S. Public Records 1970-2009.

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CCC CAMP AT BACA CANYON

A Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Camp was established at the location (in New Mexico). After it was vacated, the place was also used as a National Youth Administration (NYA) camp. It was then used as a Japanese-American Internment Camp during World War II.

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ROSCOMMON CCC MUSEUM

Two northern Michigan history museums opened their seasonal doors to visitors this spring — The Hartwick Pines Logging Museum in Grayling and the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Museum in Roscommon.

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YOUR AFFECTIONATE SON

A piece of history has found a home at Missouri State University West Plains.

John Arnold, a sergeant for the Union during the Civil War, penned over 50 letters from 1860 to 1864. Most of them are addressed to "mother and father" and signed "your affectionate son".

West Plains resident Chuck Kimberlin donated the entire set of letters to the university.

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DAR OFFERS FREE ONLINE RESEARCH TOOLS

It provides seven databases that contain a wealth of information to help potential DAR members complete membership applications, but even genealogists who do not plan to join DAR may find valuable information on their ancestors.

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Tuesday, September 22, 2015

HAVE SKILLS, WILL TRAVEL

Can’t get to NPRC, but need to get some military records research done? Here’s a list of researchers who can do it for you (for a price, of course):

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Perhaps you need somebody who can research the civilian records held in St. Louis instead:

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Or check these lists, should you need research done at some other NARA facilities:

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SEVEN WAYS SUMMER VACATIONS HAVE CHANGED

When you are moving forward in history, as we living people do, it is extremely difficult to keep track of all the things that have changed significantly during our lifetimes. That goes double for this time of spectacular ongoing technological innovation:

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PRIVACY ISSUES FOR FAMILY HISTORIANS

Thoughtful discussion of factors to consider when deciding whether or not to include potentially sensitive info in a family history book or online tree:

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THOUGHTS ON SOCIAL SECURITY

The origins of the system:

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VIRGINIA GENEALOGY FAST FACTS

Here are nine key details you need to know when tracing Virginia ancestors:

1. Statehood: 1788

2. Colony founded: 1607

3. First extant federal census: 1810 (partial)

4. Available colonial censuses: 1624-1625, 1782, 1783, 1784, 1785, 1786 (1700s censuses are partial)

5. Statewide birth, death and marriage records begin: 1830

6. State-land state (as an original colony, the state rather than the federal government had authority over selling off land to individuals)

7. Counties: 95

8. Independent cities: 39

9. Contact for vital records: Virginia Department of Health, Office of Vital Records and Health Statistics, Box 1000, Richmond, VA 23218, (804) 662-6200

(Courtesy of Family Tree University e-newsletter)

Saturday, September 19, 2015

EVENTS AT MGC

Beginning Genealogy
October 6 at 2:00 p.m.

Find out the fundamentals of beginning your genealogical research project. We will discuss organization, census information, vital records, and where to look for information. This is a beginning level class.

Revenge, Retaliation, & Retribution
October 20 at 7:00 p.m.

Learn about the reality of the Brigade of Jayhawkers led by General James Henry Lane and the campaign of destruction and devastation they caused across western Missouri in 1861. It was a time of retaliation for the destruction during the epoch of Bleeding Kansas. Nothing was safe, homes, barns, outbuildings, fencing, and businesses and were passionately destroyed by fire and very little survived.

MGC

AMERICAN MILITARY CASUALTIES & BURIALS

NARA Finding Aid:

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DRUMMING OUT

Are you familiar with the historical military practice of drumming a soldier out of the army?

This process of dishonorably discharging a soldier had its origins in the British army in the 17th century and was later picked up by the American military. Soldiers could be drummed out for a variety of reasons, from thievery to desertion.

Usually, during a drumming out, the guilty man’s head was shaved, the insignia and buttons taken from his uniform, and a sign detailing his crime hung around his neck. Sometimes he was dressed in felon’s clothes or white feathers were placed above his ears, and other times a rope was put around his neck and he would be led by the smallest drummer boy. The convict would then be marched between the lines of his fellow soldiers to the tune of “Rogue’s March,” and he would be taken to the entrance of the camp, where he was sent on his way with orders to never return.

“Rogue’s March” was often played by drums and fifes, though if they couldn’t be found, a trumpet was sometimes substituted and the process was called being “blown out” of the army. During the Civil War, “Yankee Doodle” was sometimes played instead of “Rogue’s March.”

The point of drumming out a soldier was to make his departure from the military humiliating enough that others would be discouraged from committing the same crime. So in addition to being drummed out, the local newspaper would sometimes write about the man’s crime to make it public. However, drumming out eventually fell out of favor as a punishment, and by World War II it had largely been dropped altogether in the U.S.

FOLD3.COM

MHM USABILITY STUDY

The Missouri History Museum's web office is running a usability study. In an effort to improve our website, we're looking for people who may be interested in trying out museum-related websites and giving their feedback. Qualifying participants will receive a $10 gift certificate to the Missouri History Museum gift shop.

What Will I Be Doing?
Participants will be asked to do several short tasks using our website and answer questions about their experience and perceptions of the site.

How Long Will This Take?
Not long at all! Sessions will last about an hour.

When:
Weekdays, Monday, October 5, through Friday, November 6, from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Where: MHM's Goldstein Conference Room

Interested in Participating? Call (314) 367-9038 to schedule your session.

Wednesday, September 16, 2015

LAST OF THE CIVIL WAR VETERANS

Story with numerous photos of these aging heroes:

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RHODE ISLAND SHIPWRECKS

Animation on the opening screen for this website is so cool—I could watch it for hours!

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THE CIVIL WAR IN DALLAS COUNTY

When the Civil War began in 1861, the majority of Dallas County residents supported the Union. As such, there were no Confederate companies organized within Dallas County boundaries. However, some did leave the county to fight for the Confederate cause.

Men from Dallas County fought in several Union regiments. These included: Company 1, 8th Regiment, Missouri Volunteer Infantry, which included Lt. Thomas Franklin and James M. Reeser, raised in September 1862, and Company D, 15th Regiment, Missouri Volunteer Cavalry under Capt. T.B. Sutherland in November 1863, whose responsibility was to clear the county of bushwhackers.

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EVERYTHING GERMAN IN ST. LOUIS

The only thing more German than an Oktoberfest is a celebration of German-American Day ! The Germans of St. Louis will celebrate their annual German-American Day (October 6) on Sunday, October 4th, from 1 - 4 p.m. inside its’ own beautiful St. Louis German Cultural Society Hall at 3652 Jefferson Avenue in St. Louis, MO 63118. In 1983, President Reagan proclaimed October 6 as German-American Day to celebrate and honor the 300th anniversary of German American immigration to the U.S. In 1987, Congress approved the National holiday designating October 6 as German-American Day, at which time the President called on Americans to observe the day with appropriate ceremonies and activities. The St. Louis’ German-American Committee will do exactly that and the festivities will begin with St. Louis’ own Honorary German Consul Lansing Hecker.

Everything German in St. Louis

All of the German-American organizations of St. Louis and St. Charles County will be represented, featuring German music, dancing, fun and food. You are invited to join the St. Louis German Cultural Society, Deutscher Männerchor, The German School Association, the German American Heritage Society of St. Louis, the St. Charles German Heritage Club, the St. Louis-Stuttgart Sister Cities, The St. Louis German Cultural Society’s Damenchor, the St. Louis area Stammtisch groups, the Liederkranz,

D’Froeliche Schuhplattler and many more. The new Official St. Louis Bösseln Association will be there recruiting new leagues. The Missouri German Consortium will have two local authors, Jim Merkel with his book Beer, Brats and Baseball; and Dorris Keeven-Franke with her book Utopia- Revisiting a German State in America. The German Cultural Center will share their educational resources for both students and teachers. The St. Louis-Stuttgart Sister Cities will take you on a photographic tour of the City of Stuttgart Germany! The Germanic Genealogy Special Interest Group will have computers and help you discover your German heritage!

Music, Dancing, Fashion Show, Raffle Prizes

An afternoon of German entertainment on the stage will include the Liederkranz Singing Society, the St. Louis German Cultural Society’s Damenchor (Women’s Choir), a fashion show of traditional and contemporary German clothing showcased by the St. Charles German Heritage Club, and the St. Louis German Cultural Society’s Jugendgruppe (Youth Group), the Männerchor (Men’s Choral group) and D’Froeliche Schuhplattler. German refreshments will be available as well, and German Gemütlichkeit will abound. Everyone is invited to a free afternoon of fun, a chance to win GREAT raffle prizes and celebrate our great German heritage! Willkommen!

For more information see http://mo-germans.com/2015/09/15/germanamericanday/ or call 636-221-1524.

Monday, September 14, 2015

CAUGHT IN THE DRAFT

A contract worker at NPRC has admitted that he mutilated and discarded WWII draft records he was supposed to be digitizing for Ancestry.com:

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SHARED STORIES OF THE CIVIL WAR

Pratt Public Library (KS) and the Pratt County Historical Society will host “Shared Stories of the Civil War: Readers’ Theater,” a script reading and discussion led by Anne Hawkins on Sept. 29 at 7 p.m. in the Oneita Johnson Auditorium at the Pratt Public Library. Members of the community are invited to attend the free program.

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MISSOURI HISTORY MUSEUM UPDATE

Researching the History of Your House

Learn how to research the history of your home with Missouri History Museum associate archivist Dennis Northcott. See what discoveries can be found about your home and its former residents in old maps, directories, census records, historic photos, and more.

When: Saturday, October 17, 7 p.m.
Where: Ritz Park, 3147 South Grand Blvd.
How much: Free

Finding Your Ancestors in St. Louis-Area Newspapers

Historic newspapers are packed with information about our ancestors, including local news, real estate transfers, legal notices, business advertisements, and announcements of births, marriages, and deaths. Missouri History Museum associate archivist Dennis Northcott will show examples of the genealogical gems published in St. Louis-area newspapers, from the city’s first paper in 1808 to modern times. Dennis will also cover notable indexed and digitized newspapers, and tips on how to use these resources most effectively.

When: Saturday, October 31, 10:30 a.m.
Where: Missouri History Museum (Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park)
How much: Free

Sunday, September 13, 2015

KANDER ABOUT THE ARCHIVES

Secretary of State Jason Kander weighs in on the Missouri State Archives and Missouri Digital Heritage:

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YOUNG & SAVVY

Does your genealogical society skew young and savvy, or does it skew more 19th century? If it skews towards 1900, this blogger thinks you’d better change or wither on the vine:

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NEW DECORATION REGULATION

Trying to replace lost/missing military medals? There’s a new Army regulation covering that:

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ROSIE RALLY

Richmond (Va) just set a world record for most women/girls dressed as Rosie the Riveter gathered together in one place (yes, there’s a record for that):

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Monday, September 07, 2015

NOW YOU SEE ‘EM…

Short histories of nine countries you won’t be visiting in the future—they don’t exist anymore:

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SIX QUIRKY ITEMS IN THE INDIANA STATE ARCHIVES COLLECTION

Including mug shots of a very famous criminal:

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DOES THE U.S. NEED TO APOLOGIZE FOR SLAVERY?

Should the U.S. apologize for the fact that slavery existed in this country until 1865? Before you answer, consider these talking points:

1. We learned this economic system from other countries (among them Spain and Portugal) in which it existed for centuries before being adopted by English-speaking countries;

2. American slavery could not have existed without the willing complicity of the black African elite;

3. Slavery continued to exist in other countries (Brazil and Cuba to name two) after it was abolished in the U.S.;

4. The death of more than 360,000 (mostly white) Union soldiers in the violent struggle to free the slaves (and the subsequent suffering of the families of those soldiers) is all the apology/contrition that any rational person would consider necessary.

What do you think?

SHOULD THE APOLOGIES END?

This writer thinks Japan should stop apologizing for WWII atrocities, and start telling the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth about what really happened during that world-wide conflagration:

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Wednesday, September 02, 2015

REVOLUTIONARY WAR VETS OF MISSOURI

A list providing vet’s name and county of residence transcribed from, "Year Book of the Sons of the Revolution in the State of Missouri 1896" (Woodward &Tiernan Printing Company, St. Louis):

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GRIERSON’S RAID?

Why the question mark? Benjamin Grierson certainly led that most successful Civil War cavalry raid in 1863, but whose idea was it in the first place?

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QUICK GUIDE TO FEDERAL NATURALIZATION RECORDS AT NARA-KC

Just what it says:

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WILL COUNTY DIGITIZATION PROJECT

Here at the Plainfield Public Library I have recently revamped my genealogy pages to add a bunch of new digital content for Plainfield and Will county. Some of it is currently available, but much more is to come.

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We have also created a site which should be back up and running soon called Will County: Preserving History's Heritage which has Will County info including an index to all property transactions in Will County from 1836-1885. The same info is also available through the Illinois Digital Archives which is a free site that has resources for the entire state.

Tina Beaird
Reference Librarian
Plainfield Public Library