Tuesday, June 30, 2015

HOOSIER STATE CHRONICLES

Hoosier State Chronicles is operated by the Indiana State Library and funded by the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act. We seek to provide free, online access to high quality digital images of Indiana's historic newspapers by digitizing our collection, and assisting other organizations in making their collections digitally available.

This collection currently (as of April 2015) contains 32,505 issues comprising 236315 pages:

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DON’T FORGET THE LADIES!

Memorial Day 2015 has come and gone, but before the holiday is too far in the past, we should also honor the many women who served and died. Women entered the military in large numbers during World War II. Certainly, women — including Jewish women — also served in combat zones prior to WWII:

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A WAKE-UP CALL TO REMEMBER…

You might not think there's an inventor in your family tree, but people applied for patents on all kinds of innovations, from an alarm clock that hangs above the sleeper and falls on his face if he doesn't wake up (Patent No. 256,265, April 11, 1882) to a screen attachment for ladies' bicycles to hide their feet and ankles from view (Patent No. 557,488, March 31, 1896).

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FUNDING THE FUTURE..

Every ten years, Missourians vote to reauthorize our state’s one-tenth cent sales tax, which funds soil and water conservation and state parks. In 2016, the tax is up for renewal. By voting for the continuation of the state parks sales tax, citizens will ensure that Missouri remains a state of discovery, and rediscovery, for future generations:

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JUST A NUDGE WAS NEEDED

Some Californians wanted the Golden State to side with the South—and worked behind the scenes to try and make it happen:

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SANDY BONNYMAN IS COMING HOME

The remains of this Marine Corps Medal of Honor winner have been discovered on Tarawa in the South Pacific:

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Saturday, June 27, 2015

SPEAKING OF FIREWORKS...

By the way, is anybody else REALLY annoyed by municipalities that say that fireworks are illegal, yet seem to do NOTHING AT ALL to enforce such ordinances?

LIGHTING UP THE NIGHT ON A CLAY COUNTY PATRIOT’S FARM

Each year we celebrate our independence with spectacular fireworks displays and family gatherings. For the past 4 1/2 decades, one of our more prominent celebrations has taken place in Clay County at Worlds of Fun.

Here is a little-known fact that I hope will better connect you to Independence Day: the area where Worlds of Fun shoots off fireworks was the farmland of one of our Clay County Revolutionary War veterans, James Crowley.

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HOW MANY WERE “OUT” DURING THE RISING?

The Irish Military Pensions Archive has published a list of all those who were involved in the Easter Week Rising (1916).

After almost 100 years we may at last have the definitive answer to an age-old question - how many were “out” in 1916?

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HOW FAR IS TOO FAR (PART II)?

The Apple Store has removed apps that feature the Confederate flag, including battle simulations. Are Apple and various other corporations acting responsibly, or are they attempting to engineer a Stalinist revision of history in which events they disapprove of are simply erased from the historical record?

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HOW FAR IS TOO FAR?

Should Confederate symbols be removed from all public places and government facilities?

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Wednesday, June 24, 2015

SIX AND COUNTING…

Have Hoosier ancestors, but don’t belong to the Indiana Genealogical Society? Might be time to sign up:

The Indiana Genealogical Society website now has at least 6 databases for each of Indiana's 92 counties!

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Mc HENRY COUNTY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY CONFERENCE

Genealogists and family historians will learn about using cemeteries, maps and court records at a conference in July.

The McHenry County Illinois Genealogical Society is sponsoring the event from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. July 11 at McHenry County College Conference Center, 8900 Route 14, Crystal Lake.

The conference is designed for all genealogists and family historians regardless of experience.

This year’s speakers include Debbie Parker Wayne, speaking on DNA; Thomas MacEntee on technology and genealogy; Greg Phelps on cemeteries; Jane Haldeman on Family Tree Maker; Craig Pfannkuche on using maps in genealogy; and Ray Johnson on often overlooked sources for genealogy and Cook County court records.

There will be a number of vendors present, and door prizes are being offered by Ancestry.com, Crystal Inn Hotel in Salt Lake City, My Heritage, Swedish American Genealogists and Newspapers.com.

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CLARE ROOTS SOCIETY CONFERENCE

You certainly can’t beat the location of this upcoming conference:

The third International family history conference “Diaspora of the Wild Atlantic Way” will take place in Ennis on the 24th to 25th September 2016.

Hosted by the Clare Roots Society, who are celebrating their 10th year in 2016, the keynote speaker will be renowned author and genealogy blogger Dick Eastman from the USA, who is making his first trip to Ireland. Dick is the author of Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter which is published daily. He has been involved in genealogy for over 30 years.

Another significant speaker will be the famous Scottish genealogist and author of over 30 books, Dr. Bruce Durie who is currently a Fulbright scholar in the USA researching migration. He will speak on Irish emigration to Scotland.

Dr. Durie is Honorary Fellow in Genealogical, Palaeographic and Heraldic Studies within the Centre for Lifelong Learning at the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow.

Author and genealogist John Grenham will also be a guest speaker at this two day event. He has researched, written and lectured on genealogy in Ireland for over thirty years. His book, Tracing your Irish Ancestors, now in its 4th edition, has been the bible for genealogists worldwide tracing their Irish roots.

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CANNONBALLS ON CAMPUS

The Civil War apparently isn’t over at the University of Alabama, where workers discovered ten cannonballs under a sidewalk near the college library:

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IOWA NICE

Their reputation for hospitality doesn’t seem to extend to their neighbors to the south:

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Sunday, June 21, 2015

15 MASSIVE DATABASES

Some you are surely aware of—others, not so much…

Here are 15 massive online databases you can access and analyze for free, or just peruse at your leisure.

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VIRGINIA VITAL RECORDS ONLINE

More than 16 million Virginia vital records have been digitized and indexed as a result of collaboration between Ancestry and the Virginia Department of Health (VDH). These records were officially released to the public on June 2, 2015.

For vital records which are now “open”, the image of the original vital record can be viewed online through Ancestry; for records which are still “closed’, an index with key information is available online through VDH. Virginia death, marriage and divorce records are “closed” for 25 years; Virginia births are “closed” for 100 years.

Virginia has required localities to maintain birth, marriage and death records in the 20th century since 1912. The Virginia vital records presently available through Ancestry are birth and death records from 1912 to 2014, divorce records from 1918 to 2014, and marriage records from 1936 to 2014. Presumably 1912-1936 marriages will be added later. The birth records released include delayed births going back to 1864, but recorded after 1912.

For those without an Ancestry subscription, try www.vdh.state.va.us/vital_records/ for the index. Library of Virginia patrons who are physically at the Library can also access the Ancestry database free of charge.

A link to the vital records index will subsequently be placed on the Library of Virginia website, and all original vital records will be turned over to the Library of Virginia by VDH as they become “open”, commencing later this year.

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BUREAU COUNTY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY

The Bureau County Genealogical Society will meet for its regular monthly meeting at 7 p.m. Thursday, June 25, at the Society library at 629 S. Main St. in Princeton (IL).

The public is invited to attend the free program that will be presented by Steve Szabados. His program will be "Using the Internet for Your Genealogical Research." This is a topic of interest to most researchers. He is expected to cover areas such as Family Search, Ellis Island, Find A Grave, Ancestry, Heritage Quest and many more. He will also discuss message boards and online family trees to help solve brick wall problems and to discover some European resources.

At the state level, Szabados is involved with the Illinois State Genealogical Society and he also is a part of the Polish Genealogical Society of America.

For further information on the program or other topics, call the Society library at 815- 879-3133 or stop by during the normal hours of operation, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday, or the first Saturday of each month.

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MICHIGAN HISTORICAL MUSEUM SYSTEM

Enjoy the 12 museums and historic sites in the Michigan Historical Museum System—your pathway to fun and discovery. The Michigan Historical Museum in Lansing presents an overview of the state's history. Other historic sites and museums throughout the state focus on themes in Michigan history.

Visit Michigan's state museums online or in person. Click on the map or on the list in the left column to go to each museum's home page, where you'll find maps, hours and other visitor information.

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NAPOLEON’S IRISH LEGION

Napoleon recruited Irish soldiers to form his Irish Legion (or Legion Irlandaise in French) in 1803. They were originally a light infantry unit, but as the years went on the legion grew into a regiment of four battalions. At the start, many of the recruits were veterans of the Irish Rebellion of 1798 who left Ireland after they were defeated.

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NEW RULING ON AGENT ORANGE EXPOSURE

Ending years of wait, the government agreed Thursday to provide disability benefits to as many as 2,100 Air Force reservists and active-duty forces exposed to Agent Orange residue on airplanes used in the Vietnam War.

The new federal rule covers an expanded group of military personnel who flew or worked on Fairchild C-123 aircraft in the U.S. from 1969 to 1986 and were believed to have been exposed to Agent Orange residue. The planes had been used to spray millions of gallons of the chemical herbicide during the Vietnam War.

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Friday, June 19, 2015

IOWA DIGITAL LIBRARY

The Iowa Digital Library features more than a million digital objects created from the holdings of the University of Iowa Libraries and its campus partners. Included are illuminated manuscripts, historic maps, fine art, historic newspapers, scholarly works, and more. Digital collections are coordinated by Digital Research & Publishing.

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CAN THE FOUR MILLION OF YOU KEEP A SECRET?

At least 4 million Americans have security clearances:

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FROM SNAFU TO SECRET SQUIRREL

Phrases first used by the military that have passed into common usage:

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THE STARS AND STRIPES

From February 8, 1918, to June 13, 1919, by order of General John J. Pershing, the United States Army published a newspaper for its forces in France, The Stars and Stripes. This online collection, presented by the Serial and Government Publications Division of the Library of Congress, includes the complete seventy-one-week run of the newspaper's World War I edition.

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THE BUG BITES IN CANADA TOO, EH?

Seems that some Canadians get bitten by the “genealogy bug” just like many Americans do:

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A WALK THROUGH ST. LOUIS HISTORY

Missouri History Museum associate archivist Dennis Northcott will take you on a walk through St. Louis history, as told by documents in the archives. Hear why one St. Louis resident described the atmosphere in Civil War St. Louis as being akin to the French Revolution; learn about the beautiful pond that once sat in what is now the heart of downtown; find out why a committee of public health officials shut down local breweries in 1849; and much more!

When: Saturday, June 20, 10:30 a.m.
Where: Missouri History Museum (Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park)
How much: Free; reservations are not required.

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CONNECTING PRESIDENTIAL COLLECTIONS

Connecting Presidential Collections (CPC) is a free centralized site for searching across presidential collections. It is funded by the IMLS and Univ. of VA's Miller Center.

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JACK AND BOBBY

A major new exhibit was unveiled recently at the John F. Kennedy Hyannis Museum.

“Jack & Bobby: Brothers First” chronicles the relationship between President John F. Kennedy and his younger brother Robert F. Kennedy through more than 60 rare photographs, private letters and their own words.

The exhibit was created by New York museum exhibit designer Roger Westerman.

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TODAY IN HISTORY

Among other things:

On June 19, 1865, Union troops commanded by Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger arrived in Galveston, Texas, with news that the Civil War was over, and that all remaining slaves in Texas were free, an event celebrated to this day as "Juneteenth."

In 1944, during World War II, the two-day Battle of the Philippine Sea began, resulting in a decisive victory for the Americans over the Japanese.

In 1953, Julius Rosenberg, 35, and his wife, Ethel, 37, convicted of conspiring to pass U.S. atomic secrets to the Soviet Union, were executed at Sing Sing Prison in Ossining, New York.

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CPL. DARDEN GOES HOME TO AKRON

On March 7, 1951, U.S. Marines came upon a chilling scene in the narrow valley north of Hoengsong, Korea.

Frozen temperatures had preserved the bodies of nearly 500 American soldiers that lay scattered on the field of a battle that had played out three weeks earlier. Marines marked the spot with a sign that read: “Massacre Valley.”

Presumed to be a casualty of one of the bloodiest battles of the Korean War was an 18-year-old Army corporal from Akron named Kenneth P. Darden.

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Wednesday, June 17, 2015

BLOOD IN THE RAIN

On a rainy morning in late May 1865, the guerrilla war in Missouri came to an appropriately bloody end:

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DIXIE REMEMBERS THAT GUY FROM GALENA

The Ulysses S. Grant Library at Mississippi State University's Mitchell Memorial Library contains more than 600 items, including 32 volumes of "The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant."

It also includes the Bultema-Williams Collection of photographs and images, political cartoons, letters and documents relating to the 18th President of the United States.

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RETURNING YEATS TO IRELAND

A long forgotten record of the return to Ireland of the remains of W.B. Yeats has emerged from the Irish Military Archives and is available online to coincide with the 150th anniversary on Saturday of the poet’s birth.

The body of the poet, who died in January 1939 and was buried at Roquebrune-Cap-Martin in south-eastern France, was brought by sea from Nice to Galway in September 1948 for reinterring in Drumcliffe Churchyard in Co. Sligo. It was transported by the LE Macha, the first overseas deployment of a ship of the Irish Naval Service.

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GETTING BETTER AT BURGAGE

A Nottinghamshire house that once served as home for Lord Byron is recreating its time as a hospital for soldiers from World War I.

About 70 men at a time were treated at Burgage Manor in Southwell, sent from acute hospitals in Leicester and Lincoln.

The weekend will see volunteers in period clothing along with contemporary music and displays of memorabilia.

Organisers said they wanted to commemorate not just the solders but also the work of nurses and doctors.

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WHAT I DO AS A GENEALOGIST

Interested in a career as a genealogist? This article should help:

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Monday, June 15, 2015

MISSOURI DIGITAL HERITAGE--NEWSPAPERS

Digitized versions of Missouri newspapers--various titles, various date ranges:

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INVISIBLE WOUNDS

Thoughtful essay by an Australian historian on how post-traumatic stress affects not just veterans but also the people who love and sometimes care for them:

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DESMOND-FISH DOES DIGITAL

July sessions teach web skills

The Desmond-Fish Library in Garrison (NY) is holding a series of clinics on Tuesday evenings in June and July to teach computer-related skills. The sessions are free and will cover a variety of topics, including creating a free website, genealogy resources, Etsy, social media marketing, and protecting online privacy.

June 23 at 6:30 p.m. Genealogy Workshop: Learn how you can use online tools to research your family tree. This session is hosted by Chip Rowe and Cathy Lilburne.

June 30 at 6:30 p.m. Social Media Marketing for Businesses, Nonprofits and Freelancers: This panel discuss will cover how you can cultivate your digital audience and help them become your online ambassadors. Panelists are Dave McCarthy from Tightrope Interactive, author Debra Anastasia and online promoter Pam McCluskey.

July 7 at 6:30 p.m. Creating a Free Website With Wix: Make a free website with Wix’s online templates.

July 14 at 6:30 p.m. Online Privacy – Managing Your Digital Footprint: Learn simple steps to secure your data.

July 21 at 6:30 p.m. Etsy Workshop for Beginners and Advanced Merchants: Learn how to sell your handmade and vintage goods on Etsy and how to build a community to drive your sales. Beginner session is 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.; advanced session 7:30 to 8:30 p.m.

All sessions are free and open to the public. The Desmond-Fish Library is located at 472 Route 403 (at the corner of 9D) in Garrison. For more information visit desmondfishlibrary.org or call 845-424-3020.

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BULGARIAN ARCHIVES OPENS TO RESEARCHERS

Bulgarian Communist-era military intelligence archives will now be open to researchers and journalists, Defence Minister Nikolay Nenchev announced Wednesday.

The minister said he had released around 30,000 archived objects to the Civil Commission, which is in charge of examining documents from this period.
In principle, the revelation of ex-agent names and collaborators of the Bulgarian secret service has no legal consequences, AFP announced.

In 2011, however, dozens of Bulgarian ambassadors, including those posted in Berlin, Athens, Beijing, Stockholm and at the UN and UNESCO, were recalled after their past activities were revealed.

Until now, the Communist-era archives were only accessible to the defence minister, under the pretext of keeping the names of foreign agents secret. But the president of the Civil Commission, Evtim Kostadinov, said the names will remain secret.

Until the fall of communist dictator Todor Zhivkov in 1989, Bulgaria was considered one of the most loyal allies to the former Soviet Union, and its secret service sometimes assassinated opponents abroad, including with the infamous "poisoned umbrella" murder of Bulgarian defector Georgy Markov in 1978.

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LET SLIP THE DOGS OF WAR

Note: Only read the comments if you have a box of Kleenex close at hand...

Unlike many other countries, when the United States entered World War II, they didn’t have a canine corps. But the military came to believe that dogs would prove an asset, so in 1942 a war dog program was introduced. Since the country was already at war, the military needed a large number of dogs right away, so they asked Americans to volunteer their pet dogs for service in the Army, Marines, Navy, and Coast Guard.

In the beginning, they accepted almost any kind of medium- to larger-size dog, but they eventually found that some breeds were better for service than others and limited the accepted breeds mainly to German Shepherds, Belgian Sheep Dogs, Doberman Pinschers, Farm Collies, Giant Schnauzers, Airedale Terriers, Rottweilers, Huskies, Malamutes, Eskimo dogs and mutts that were predominantly any of those breeds.

Americans volunteered almost 20,000 of their beloved pets, but only about half of that number were accepted and trained. Of those, only around 2,000 were finally sent overseas; the rest were used stateside.

The vast majority of dogs the military accepted were trained as sentry dogs. These dogs were used as guard dogs at various types of military installations and by the Coast Guard to patrol shorelines. Also highly valued, by both the Army and the Marines, were scout dogs. These dogs went ahead of patrols and silently alerted their handlers if they sensed anyone nearby.

There were other types of dogs trained by the military, but they were used less than sentry and scout dogs. These included sled and pack dogs, mine detection dogs, and messenger dogs.

After the war ended, the dogs were “demilitarized” and taught to socialize and act like normal dogs again. Dogs that successfully completed that process were sent back to their original owners—if the owners still wanted them. If the dogs were unwanted, they were either adopted by their former handlers or sold to new families. Want to see these war dogs? On Fold3, you can find a few photos of WWII’s canine soldiers and the men who worked with them:

• A photo of “Ricky,” half collie, half shepherd, of the 6th War Dog Platoon, crawling into mouth of a cave on Iwo Jima
• A photo of a Husky sled team helping to rescue the crew of a downed Douglas C-47 in Alaska
• A photo of Casimir P. “Casey” Gorajec of the U.S. Army’s Canine Corps in New Caledonia

Learn more about Word War II topics in Fold3’s World War II Collection!

Friday, June 12, 2015

ASK AND YE WILL PROBABLY RECEIVE...

World War II soldier Albert J. Kidwell stormed the beaches of Normandy and endured the grueling Battle of the Bulge. But until recently, no one in Kidwell's family knew of his heroic past.

Kidwell died in 1991 and took his World War II stories with him. Two decades later, an innocent inquiry from Kidwell's great-grandson Collin Sullivan was the beginning of a grand family discovery, one that has led to his family receiving medals and decorations Kidwell earned and rightfully deserved.

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Note: I’m glad that numerous WWII vets are finally getting medals and accolades that they earned in the war, but I am somewhat annoyed that most of the news articles about these vets either imply or blatantly state that these honors and accolades have for various (nearly always unstated) reasons been purposely withheld from the vet or his family by our secretive (and stingy) federal government.

This contention is generally pure balderdash. The National Personnel Records Center has always been there to help 20th century veterans access their records. It may be that memories are too painful, and the veteran has purposely not wanted to think about his war service; it may be that the veteran who until recently merely felt that he had “done his duty” now realizes that time is truly running out; or it may be that necessary records were destroyed in the 1973 fire—regardless, it was not government conspiracy that separated that hero from his medals, it was merely a failure to request them…

A GIANT PASSES

We like to say that this or that person was a Renaissance man or woman, but Sir Christopher Lee really was such a man. He was fluent in five languages, and passable in three more. He was the only member of the cast of the Lord of the Rings movies who had actually met J.R.R. Tolkien. He was the only actor to have played a Star Wars villain, a James Bond baddie, and a monster in a feature-length motion picture. He starred in at least one movie every year from 1948 to this year (except for well-earned breaks in 1995 and 2006). He was also a classically trained musician who recorded several heavy metal albums. And that’s certainly not all:

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THE FOOL ON THE HILL MEETS THE FAB FOUR

Going to be in Austin soon? Here’s your chance to pay tribute to LBJ and meet the Beatles:

For two weeks starting June 13, visitors to the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library will be able to see John Lennon's guitar and hundreds of other Beatles memorabilia.

While it may seem odd for the "Ladies and Gentleman...the Beatles!" exhibit to be housed at the LBJ Library, organizers said it's actually an appropriate home for the exhibit.

"The Beatles come in 1964, just after LBJ takes office as the nation is trying to get over Kennedy assassination. The Beatles really help us to move on in some respects, they give us a little bit of frivolity in a really tragic time," said Mark Upegrove, director of the LBJ Library.

The exhibit wraps up with a life-size display of the Abbey Road crosswalk, allowing fans to replicate the iconic Beatles album cover.

The public can see Lennon's guitar June 13 to 29. Opening day is free to the public.

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CIVIL WAR MEDICAL ENCAMPMENT

The Old State Capitol State Historic Site is traveling back in time to become a Civil War field hospital June 12 – 14.

This event kicks off “History Comes Alive” programming in downtown Springfield. The annual Civil War Medical Encampment will return for the weekend with demonstrations of medical techniques and other parts of Civil War time period life.

Attendees will also be able to view one of the nation's largest private collections of Civil War medical artifacts.

Special guests include: Jim Hicks and the Rusty Pickup String Band, the Springfield International Folk Dancers and Max Daniels portraying President Abraham Lincoln. Daniels will also hold a “news conference” where visitors may ask him questions about his presidency and life.

Visitors will also be able to view reenactments of Civil War camps, learn about the soldiers and speak with “generals” about their Civil War experiences.

There is no admission fee for the event. A complete schedule of Springfield events is available here.

ABOMINATION AGAINST CIVILIANS

In Lawrence, Kansas, there’s no debate about Quantrill’s Raid: it was a criminal massacre of unarmed men and boys, not a military operation:

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WHO WERE THE BUSHWHACKERS?

Bushwhackers were Missouri-based Confederate partisans who believed they were defending their homes and families against the federal government and Union sympathizers during the Civil War era, according to Will Tollerton, coordinator of the Bushwhacker Museum and Historic Jail in Nevada, Mo.

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RETRIEVING THE PAST AT PAUOA

Cemeteries can provide a wealth of information for people tracing their Native Hawaiian genealogy, Napoleon said. But little or no burial records were kept at many of these mid- to late 19th century cemeteries, Napoleon said. The vast majority of Hawaii's 300 cemeteries are like Pauoa's, where a chapel once stood near where a monkeypod tree now looms tall and wide.

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Monday, June 08, 2015

GUERRILLAS IN THE WEST

The border war between Missouri and Kansas will be the topic of the next meeting of the Rochester Civil War Roundtable at 7 p.m. June 10 at the History Center of Olmsted County, 1195 West Circle Drive SW in Rochester (MN).

Speaker David Allen's program, "Guerrillas in the West," will look at the history of the conflict between Missouri, a slave state, and the abolitionists of Kansas, in the years before and during the Civil War. Bands of armed and mounted men conducted raids on both sides of the border, killing thousands of people.

Admission is free, but donations will be gratefully accepted.

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DID THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR EVER END?


While the article noted above is a thoughtful and extremely informative one on this subject, I think articles on this subject mainly miss the point: yes, the war ended. Yes, it most certainly achieved its main objective: holding this country together as one great unified nation by preventing by force of arms its separation into two smaller (and infinitely less powerful and prosperous) fiefdoms. It also ended slavery and transformed this country into the world’s indisputable industrial superpower. So, calling the American Civil War a failure because it did not solve for all time all of America’s problems blithely ignores the fact that the United States comprises all the ground from Canada to Mexico between two great oceans only because Mr. Lincoln’s Army in fact successfully ended the South’s bid for separation.

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RE-ENACTORS DON’T JUST STUDY THE PAST…

This Civil War re-enactor is so immersed in that conflict, he bought one cannon and went halfsies on another one:

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DARK SHADOWS IN AVILLA

Avilla, Missouri is supposedly host to numerous restless Civil War spirits, including one called Rotten Johnny:

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Thursday, June 04, 2015

FACES NEVER FORGOTTEN

Dedicated volunteers are tracking down photos of all 58,300 persons listed on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial (includes a complete list of Nevada casualties of the war):

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BOMB TECHS ADDED TO MEMORIAL WALL

The names of seven military bomb technicians who died in World War II are now part of a memorial wall at Eglin Air Force Base (FL):

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ASHEVILLE CITIZEN-TIMES GENEALOGY COLUMN

Another newspaper providing genealogy research tips:

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REMEMBERING ‘NAM AT BELIOT MEMORIAL HS

Vietnam vets shared their memories (and artifacts) with freshmen at this Wisconsin high school:

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DOCUMENTING GENESEE’S DEAD

A retiree painstakingly pulled together photographs and primary source documents to tell the stories of 66 WWI casualties from Genesee County, NY:

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Monday, June 01, 2015

THRONATEESKA GOES DIGITAL

Going to be in Georgia, or have a Georgia relative or friend?

ALBANY, Ga. – Get the tools to map out your lineage with Thronateeska Heritage Center and Dougherty County Public Library at their upcoming digital genealogy workshop. The program will be held on Saturday, June 6, 2015 at the Dougherty County Public Library downtown off of Pine Avenue and will run from 10:30 a.m. until 12:00 p.m.

Youth Librarian Laura Elliot with lead the workshop and will be giving tips about changes in technology, archival software, utilization of photos in genealogy, proper storage devices and much more.

“The main purpose is to introduce the software and photo techniques for patrons to preserve their photos and research for future generations,” said Elliot. “This will make it much easier for their kids and grandkids to create their whole history continuing on and on.”

The cost is free, but prior registration is required because space is limited.

Contact Laura Elliot at 229-420-3244, lelliott@docolib.org to register.


LAKES AREA NEWSPAPER ARCHIVE

The Spirit Lake (Ia.) Public Library spearheaded a successful effort to digitize area newspapers from 1880 to the present:

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MISSISSIPPI MARINE BRIGADE & THE RAM FLEET

The following sources have recently been added to the Missouri History Museum's Genealogy and Local History Index. To search the index globally, visit the main page.

1. Forms filled out by Civil War veterans for the biographical appendix to Warren D. Crandall's History of the Ram Fleet and Mississippi Marine Brigade (published in 1907).

HOMEGROWN GENIUS: WALT DISNEY IN MISSOURI

June 13th at 2:00 p.m.
Midwest Genealogy Center

A half century after his death, Walter Elias Disney remains a household name and a pioneer of family entertainment who during his lifetime was often described as a cinematic genius. Join film critic and enthusiast Robert Butler as he focuses on how Disney recycled memories of his childhood and youth in Marceline and Kansas City MO. Employing historic and current photos, this presentation will show Disney's Kansas City haunts -- including his family home and the building where he established his first animation studio -- and introduce the Kansas City friends who followed him to Hollywood and became giants of the animation industry.

THE WAR IN LIVING COLOR

When many of us think of photos from World War II, we think of black-and-white images. After all, most of the iconic photographs from the war—like those capturing the flag raising on Iwo Jima or the VJ Day kiss in Times Square—are in that medium. But actually, color photography had slowly been becoming more popular and available in the years leading up to the war. So while it was still quicker and easier to shoot and develop black-and-white photos, a growing number of war photographers began using color film to capture the people, places, and events of the World War II, giving us a chance today to see the war how those who lived through it did—in living color.

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