Saturday, April 25, 2015

REMEMBERING THE WOLF CREEK RANGERS

These men from Tama County, Iowa participated in several of the Civil War’s bloodiest battles:

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ORPHAN TRAINS

The Henry County Genealogical Society (IL) will meet Monday, April 27 at 1:30 p.m. in the Kewanee Public Library second floor meeting room. An elevator is available at the First Street entrance.

Angie Snook, Curator of the Geneseo Historical Museum, will present the program, “The Orphan Train in Henry County.”

Orphan trains carried more than 250,000 homeless children from the East Coast to the Midwest farmlands between 1854 and 1929. A large portion of them settled in Henry County and grew up on local farms in this area. Others went on to Iowa and Kansas.
There were many reasons and stories of why the children rode the orphan trains. Each is different in many ways, and yet, they all fought for the same goals – happiness and a family to love them.

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THE (ELUSIVE) CONFEDERATE CONSTITUTION

This historic document is displayed just one day per year at the University of Georgia:

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UKRAINIAN ROOTS

Nashi Predky in Somerset, NJ is all about helping persons interested in tracing their Ukrainian roots:

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Thursday, April 23, 2015

SILENT SENTINELS

They stand guard in communities North and South, reminders of the human cost of our Great Civil War:

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44th NEW YORK VOLUNTEER INFANTRY REGIMENT

Available full-view via Hathitrust:

A History of the Forty-fourth Regiment, New York Volunteer Infantry, in the Civil War, 1861-1865, by Captain Eugene Arus Nash (1911).

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REGISTER OF THE MILITARY ORDER OF THE LOYAL LEGION OF THE UNITED STATES

Available for free viewing/download via HathiTrust:

Aubin, Joshua Harris. Register of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States. Boston: Pub. under the auspices of the Commandery of the State of Massachusetts, 1906.

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THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG, 1863

Available for free viewing/download via HathiTrust:

Drake, Samuel Adams, 1833-1905. The Battle of Gettysburg, 1863. Boston: Lee and Shepard, 1898.

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Monday, April 20, 2015

A LONG & BLOODY CONFLICT: MILITARY OPERATIONS IN MISSOURI & KANSAS

Lengthy article on this subject:

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FREE BLACKS IN ANTEBELLUM ILLINOIS

Highlights of a talk to the Saline County (IL) Genealogical Society:

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HATHITRUST COLLECTIONS: THE STATE OF MAINE

Users of the HathiTrust website can compile lists of full-text digital books on a particular subject, in this case books relating in some way to the state of Maine:

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GRANT AND LEE ON FOLD3

On April 9, 1865, 150 years ago this month, Confederate general Robert E. Lee surrendered his Army of Northern Virginia to the Union’s Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House, Virginia, signaling the beginning of the end of the Civil War.

After Lee’s hold on Richmond and Petersburg broke, he hoped to take his army to meet up with Joseph E. Johnston‘s troops. But things came to a head with the Union Army as Lee neared Appomattox Court House. On April 6, he lost 8,000 men to the Federals in engagements at Sailor’s (Sayler’s) Creek. Grant, aware that Lee’s already dwindling army was now at an even further disadvantage, sent him a message suggesting surrender. Lee was not ready to surrender but did ask Grant for his terms.

Lee hoped to break through the Union troops that were blocking his army’s progression and planned a last ditch attempt for the morning of the 9th. When it became clear that this attempt would fail, Lee, having already dismissed the possibility of resorting to guerrilla warfare, arranged to meet with Grant to surrender his army.

The two generals met in a home in Appomattox Court House later that day. Lee dressed in his best, while Grant, whose baggage had gone astray some days prior, arrived in a mud-stained uniform. The terms of surrender stated that all arms, artillery, and public property (except officers’ side arms and horses) were to be turned over, and that the paroled men, both officers and enlisted, were to return to their homes and not take up arms again until properly exchanged. Grant also allowed Lee’s two requests: that the enlisted men also be permitted to keep their own horses and that rations be provided for his starving army.

The official surrender ceremony occurred a few days later, on the 12th. Though Lee’s army had surrendered, the war wasn’t over. There were still other Confederate troops in the field. But the Army of Northern Virginia had not only been the most successful of the Confederate armies, it—and Lee—had also taken on a symbolic power. So as other Confederate generals heard of Lee’s surrender, they too began to capitulate over the next month. President Andrew Johnson officially declared an end to hostilities on May 9.

Interested in learning more about Lee’s surrender or about other aspects of the Civil War? Explore Fold3’s Civil War Collection.

MoSGA CONFERENCE 2015!

Dear MoSGA members,

We are pleased to announce our Annual Conference will be held this August 7-8 in Columbia at the Stoney Creek Hotel and Conference Center, our venue the past 4 years. Our keynote speaker is Judy Russell, "The Legal Genealogist" who is nationally known for her wit and wisdom, making genealogy education FUN!



There are TWO ways to register:

1. Go to our website's Conference page. Choose "Pay Online". You will need to use a PayPal account to pay online.

2. OR, Fill out the registration form and mail to the MoSGA address listed on the brochure.

A copy of this brochure will be mailed to MoSGA members in a week or two. You are welcome to share it with friends who may want to attend as well.

Thank you and we hope you can attend. If you have already registered, thank you!

2015 Conference Committee

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

HONORS OF THE EMPIRE STATE IN THE WAR OF THE REBELLION

Available full-view via Hathitrust:

The honors of the Empire state in the war of the rebellion, by Thomas S. Townsend (1889).


HATHITRUST COLLECTIONS— AMERICAN PERIODICALS

Users of the HathiTrust website can put together lists of free full-text digitized books available via that website, like this list of 18th, 19th, and early 20th century American periodicals:

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PARAGOULD HERITAGE FAIR


For those people who would like to venture further into their past, or for those who would like to learn how to trace that family tree line, attending the 2015 Heritage Fair in Paragould may the perfect place to do it all. On Saturday, April 25, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., the Green County Historical and Genealogical Center will sponsor the Heritage Fair at the Research Center on 212 West Court St. in Paragould. The fair is designed to acquaint the public with the resources that are available for researching family trees in Paragould and surrounding areas, including Missouri.

Last year, vendors from other states besides Missouri and Arkansas attended, giving attendees the opportunity to purchase or talk to others who might be able to help them in their quest to search for that lost relative.

ACCESS THE CIVIL WAR COLLECTION FOR FREE!

April was a big month in the American Civil War. Not only did the conflict begin in April 1861, but this year marks the 150th anniversary of Lee's surrender to Grant, as well as Lincoln's assassination, in April 1865. In commemoration of the Civil War and Confederate History Month, Fold3 invites you to explore all records in its Civil War Collection for free April 13th to 30th.

There are currently over 43 million records in the Civil War Collection, including everything from military records to personal accounts and historic writings.

Soldier records include (among others):

• Service records and index cards
• Pension index cards
• "Widows' Pension" files
• Navy survivors certificates
• Army registers
• Final statements
• Rendezvous reports

Other record types include things like photographs, images of artifacts, and original war maps. Items such as the Lincoln Assassination Papers, Sultana Disaster documents, letters to the Adjutant General and Commission Branch, Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies, and the 1860 census are also contained in the Civil War Collection.

Monday, April 13, 2015

HATHITRUST COLLECTIONS— INDUSTRY & COMMERCE PERIODICALS

Users of the HathiTrust website can put together lists of free full-text digitized books available via that website, like this list of 19th & early 20th century industry & commerce periodicals:

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IT'S NOT OVER

Let's pretend this is 1865. Robert E. Lee just surrendered his Army of Northern Virginia two days ago. A cause for rejoicing, certainly, but guess what--it ain't over yet, folks:

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FOURTEEN COLUMNS ABOUT THE CIVIL WAR

Newspaper columns, that is, in the Pantagraph (Bloomington, IL):

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THE WATERY GRAVE OF THE MUSASHI

Billionaire Paul Allen says he has discovered the final resting place of Japan’s mightiest warship:

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NOT FADE AWAY

An extremely well-written article about people who, 150 years on, are still obsessed with the life and legacy of our 16th president:

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HIS MOTHER NEVER FORGOT

This New Zealand woman carried the photo of her slain son in her purse for the rest of her life:

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Tuesday, April 07, 2015

HATHITRUST COLLECTIONS— CALIFORNIA COUNTY HISTORIES

Users of the HathiTrust website can put together lists of free full-text digitized books available via that website, like this list of California county histories:

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ULTIMATE BOOT CD

A variety of potential computer disasters will make you wish you had a good boot CD—so make one now!

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LAST DAYS OF WWII

Recovered film footage shows US air raids on Japanese targets in the waning days of WWII:

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IRISHMEN WHO DIED FOR THE STARS AND STRIPES

Almost 1,000 Irish-born soldiers died serving with the United States army in World War I, three times higher than previous estimates, a genealogist has discovered.

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SCOUTING OUT FORGOTTEN VETERANS

A Waterloo (IL) Boy Scout’s Eagle project involved identifying graves of Civil War vets in his area:

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Saturday, April 04, 2015

GENEALOGY SUMMER CAMP

I am writing to you on behalf of the Toronto Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society to share an announcement that I hope will be of interest to your members with ancestors from Toronto or other parts of Ontario.

Genealogy Summer Camp is back! Toronto Branch has been running this innovative program for almost two decades now - we invite out-of-town researchers to Toronto for a full week of concentrated family history research at our wonderful libraries and archives, under the guidance of local experts. Local residents are welcome too, and may choose to stay with the group or attend as “day-campers”. This year’s Genealogy Summer Camp will run from Sunday 7 June to Friday 12 June 2015.

Gwyneth Pearce
Secretary – Toronto Branch, Ontario Genealogical Society

MoSGA AT NGS

The Missouri State Genealogical Association (MoSGA) is excited to have the NGS 2015 Annual Conference in the Show Me State at the Crossroads of America.

MoSGA proudly celebrates 35 years of providing resources, education and published materials to those researching Missouri ancestors. Please visit Booth 212 to join in our celebration and help spread the MoSGA love with a small token of our appreciation. We also invite you to participate in our “Pin Your Missouri Ancestor” life-size pin board.

Stop by Booth 212 to learn how you can honor your Missouri ancestor, stay informed about Missouri genealogy research opportunities and participate in Missouri genealogical and historical events. Find out more at www.mosga.org.




WAS JOHN BROWN A TERRORIST?

I think he was (even though I’m a Brown fanboy of sorts, given that his massively inept raid in fact accomplished its ultimate goal—the destruction of slavery):

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APRIL 1865

Interesting story about this very interesting month, but honestly, people, please try and get this straight—Robert E. Lee did not surrender the Confederate Army: he surrendered a Confederate army, the Army of Northern Virginia. Other Confederate armies slogged on for 1-2 months after Lee’s surrender:

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WHAT REMAINS

The Utah host of a genealogy-themed radio show has helped local detectives contact family members of a woman whose remains were found recently in Davis County after she went missing decades ago.


SOUTHERN CROSS, NORTH STAR

"Southern Cross, North Star: The Cultural Politics of Civil War Memory in Missouri and the Middle Border, 1865-1915" will be the topic when the Harold Holmes Dugger Lecture is presented April 16 at Southeast Missouri State University.

The lecture, sponsored by the Southeast Department of History, will be delivered by Christopher Phillips, professor of history at the University of Cincinnati.

The lecture will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the University Center ballroom and is free and open to the public.

Phillips is the author of seven books and a dozen essays on regionalism, particularly as expressed in the history of the border slave states that remained in the Union during the Civil War, according to a news release from Southeast.

His latest book, "The Rivers Ran Backward: The Civil War on the Middle Border and the Making of American Regionalism," will be published in October by Oxford University Press.

In "Southern Cross, North Star," Phillips will discuss how Missouri straddled north-south and east-west borders during the war.

Wednesday, April 01, 2015

ARKIVDIGITAL WORKSHOP

HANDS ON ARKIVDIGITAL WORKSHOP
Saturday, May 30 and/or Sunday, May 31
Stratford, Iowa (1 hour northwest of Des Moines)

Featuring Kathy Meade
ArkivDigital’s North America Representative
Assisted by users & Swedish researchers
For all levels of Swedish research and computer experience

For details: WWW.SWEDEBEND.COM

Presented by Volunteers of The Swedish Foundation of Iowa’s ‘Swede Bend’ Settlement, Inc.
819 Goldsmith St., PO Box 132, Stratford, Iowa 50249

AIR FORCE LEGACIES

Served in the Air Force, but have lost / misplaced your medals? These folks work with the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis to verify what awards the veterans have received. The process can take between 60 and 90 days per request, depending on how much research needs to be done.

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LONG WAY HOME

He lost his dog tag on the beaches of Normandy—but it finally found its way back home:

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MICHIGAN DEATH CERTIFICATES, 1940-1952

The Archives of Michigan is thrilled to announce that images of Michigan death certificates from 1921-1939 are now available for free at Seeking Michigan. The index for records from 1940-1952 will be made available in the next few weeks, with additional certificate images to be released each year as privacy restrictions are lifted; for example, 1940 images will be released in January 2016. Together with the records from 1897-1920 that have been available at the site for years, this collection makes Seeking Michigan the one-stop destination for more than 2.6 million free, publicly-available 20th century death records for Michigan ancestors.

This 1921-1952 collection of death certificates and indexes, in partnership with the Michigan Department of Community Health and FamilySearch, covers a critical period in the growth and development of Michigan. Here, researchers will find evidence of the influx of Eastern European immigration, the emergence of Detroit as the automotive capital of the world, and a state crippled by the Great Depression. Those ancestors that immigrated to Michigan, worked the assembly line, and struggled to make ends meet can all be found here.

An individual's last name, first name, county and township/village/city of death, birth year, age, and parents' names are all indexed and searchable. Additional information, including the decedent's occupation, cause of death, burial location, and birthplace is listed on the certificate itself.

Michigan death records from 1897-1952 are now all in one place, for free! My colleagues and I at the Archives of Michigan are so excited to share this fantastic collection of records with the genealogical community. And, as luck would have it, Seeking Michigan is also celebrating its 6th birthday this year. Enjoy and happy searching!

Kris Rzepczynski
Senior Archivist, Archives of Michigan

MISSOURI HISTORY MUSEUM UPDATE

The following sources have recently been added to the Genealogy and Local History Index. To search the index globally, visit the main page.

1. Official Army Register of the Volunteer Force of the United States Army for the Years 1861-1865

2. Attractive children portraits in the St. Louis Republic, 1905-1906

CIVIL WAR EYEWITNESSES

Dennis Northcott, associate archivist with the Missouri History Museum, provides a look at the Civil War through the eyes of those who witnessed this turbulent period in our history. Hear first-hand accounts of the war on the battlefield and the home front from letters, diaries, and other documents from the Missouri History Museum archives.

When: Thursday, April 16, 6:30 p.m.
Where: Maplewood Public Library, 7550 Lohmeyer
How much: Free

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