Thursday, November 19, 2015

GET READY FOR FGS!

We had a national genealogical conference this year at St. Charles (Mo), and next year we get one at Springfield (Il)--and hotel reservations are now open:

LINK

Note: FGS Conference is August 31-September 3, 2016.

WINDOWS THEMES

Note: What to say about these? Well, they look great, and they’re free…

From the Microsoft website: A theme is a combination of desktop background pictures, window colors, and sounds. You can preview each theme’s image collection by clicking Details. To get a theme, click Download, and then click Open. This saves the theme to your PC and puts it on your desktop.

LINK

WINDOWS DEFENDER

If you install Windows 10, you are protected against hackers from the git-go by Windows Defender. You can then choose to keep Defender running, or you can download and install another anti-virus application like Avast, Avira, or Microsoft’s own Microsoft Security Essentials (I’m running that one as we speak).

From the Microsoft website: Windows 10 is safer and more secure thanks to Windows Defender and Windows Firewall.

When you start up Windows 10 for the first time, Windows Defender is on and working to protect your PC by scanning for malicious software. It will turn itself off if you install another antivirus app.

LINK

GET STARTED WITH WINDOWS 10

If you’ve bit the bullet and decided to upgrade, this terrific online guide from Microsoft is a fast and easy way to familiarize yourself with 10’s many bells and whistles:

LINK

UPGRADE TO WINDOWS 10?

Should you upgrade to Windows 10? This FAQ on the Microsoft website may help you decide.

Your decision may also be influenced by the fact that you may well be eligible for a FREE upgrade to Windows 10. Yes, I said free—check the website for details:

LINK

Friday, October 30, 2015

OPERATION RANCH HAND

The Department of Veterans Affairs has determined that a select group of Air Force and Air Force Reserve personnel were exposed to herbicides through regular and repeated duties as ground, flight or medical crew members on contaminated Operation Ranch Hand (ORH) C-123 aircraft that were used to spray Agent Orange in Vietnam.

LINK

RISING STAR

A chance discovery in the Irish military archives has for the first time resulted in a Wexford man being publicly acknowledged as having fought in the 1916 Rising:

LINK

NELSON SMITH COLLECTION

Fans of our historic photo collection can rejoice! We’ve just completed the first phase of the Photographic Services Collection. Thanks to the hard work of our volunteer, Lindsay Ploussard, we were able to create a finding aid that lists all of the sections of Nelson Smith’s original collection of Illinois State University photographic history that we currently hold.

LINK

PVT. KELDER’S LONG ROAD HOME

It took relatives of this Illinois WWII POW a long time (and unceasing effort) to get back his mortal remains:

LINK

DIGITAL FAMILY HISTORY AT MGC

November 7, 14, & 21 at 2:00pm-4:00 p.m.

Preserve and share your family story with a digital video of your history. This three-week workshop is aimed at adults who would like to tell the story of their family on video. Combining storytelling, family photos, and images of history, participants will use basic editing software to put together a three-minute video about their family that can be passed down for generations. Participants will get to keep a DVD of their final film as well as have a link to the film online.

LINK

Monday, October 26, 2015

FAMILY TREE MAGAZINE

You can view Table of Contents (and order a copy if interested) for issues dating back to 2005 here:

LINK

NEW JERSEY ADOPTIONS

Researching them just got a little easier (or will be starting in 2017):

LINK

OBITS ARE THE KEY

To unlocking many a family’s history:

LINK

NEWS FROM JOE BEINE…

The Online Searchable Death Indexes and Records Directory has been updated with links to the following items:

LINK

KOREAN WAR UNKNOWN SOLDIER IDENTIFIED

Washington, DC--(ENEWSPF)--October 23, 2015. The Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a serviceman, missing from the Korean War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

U.S. Army Cpl. Robert E. Meyers of Greencastle, Pennsylvania, will be buried Oct. 26, in Arlington National Cemetery. Meyers, assigned to Company A, 2nd Engineer Combat Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, was declared missing in action, Dec. 1, 1950, after his unit was involved in combat operations in the vicinity of Sonchu, North Korea. The U.S. Army declared Meyers deceased March 2, 1954.

In 1954, United Nations and communist forces exchanged the remains of war dead in what came to be called “Operation Glory.” All remains recovered in Operation Glory were turned over to the Army’s Central Identification Unit for analysis. The remains they were unable to identify were interred as unknowns at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Hawaii, known as the “Punchbowl.”

In 2012, due to advances in technology, the Department of Defense began to re-examine records and concluded that the possibility of identification for some of these unknowns now existed.

To identify Meyers’ remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory used circumstantial evidence, dental analysis, and chest radiographs, which matched Meyers’ records.
Today, more than 7,800 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using advances in technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that were previously returned by North Korean officials or recovered by American teams.

LINK

Monday, October 19, 2015

A SURPRISE FOR DR. BILL!


Eddleman was one of three individuals to win a 2015 Award of Merit from the Missouri State Genealogical Society in August, but he had been unaware of his nomination.

"I didn't know I was nominated until I got notified that I was getting the award. ... It's a nice endorsement that I am doing decent work," he says.

LINK

ST. LOUIS DOCTORS & DENTISTS

The Missouri History Museum Archives holds a collection of records of the St. Louis city register. Among the items in this collection is a bound volume that comprises a roll of registered St. Louis physicians and surgeons, dated 1874-1883. Entries in this volume usually include the doctor's signature, date of registration, date of diploma, and the name and location of the school or university that granted the diploma. The back of the volume includes pages for registered dental surgeons, dated 1883-1897.

To request a lookup in this volume, contact Dennis Northcott.

OVER THERE: MISSOURI & THE GREAT WAR

Over There: Missouri & the Great War is a statewide collaborative digitization project to document Missouri’s role in World War I. The project is a digital collection of historical documents, photographs, artifacts, oral histories and other primary source material from museums, archives, libraries, and private collections from across Missouri.

LINK

Friday, October 16, 2015

TIME FOR A CHANGE?

Getting a new computer, or simply tired of your current browser? Mozilla Firefox is stable, secure, updated frequently, has tons of free add ons, and—ta da—is free:

LINK

Note: I’ve been using it for years, and love it!

READY TO BOOK A FLIGHT?

The day of the week you purchase your ticket and the day of the week you depart can have a dramatic effect on the price you pay:

LINK

THE CCC IS ALIVE!

California Conservation Corps, that is (and more states probably need something quite like it):

LINK

PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARIES

This writer suggests that (if practicable) you include a presidential library on your vacation itinerary:

LINK

Monday, October 12, 2015

ST. LOUIS COUNTY VOTER REGISTRATION BOOKS, 1924-1936

The Missouri History Museum Archives holds a collection of 608 voter registration books for St. Louis County, dated 1924-1936. This collection consists of four sets of precinct-level voter registration books for each of the county's five townships: Bonhomme, Carondelet, Central, Meramec, and St. Ferdinand. The four sets of books are dated January-October 1924; 1924-1928; 1928-1932; and 1932-1936. Within each book, the voters' names are listed alphabetically.

If you know the street address where an ancestor was living in St. Louis County (perhaps from a St. Louis County directory or the federal census), you can determine which precinct the individual resided in by consulting two green binders at the Archives Reference Desk in the Reading Room of the Missouri History Museum Library and Research Center. In these green binders, consult the precinct maps to determine which registration book to request.

Entries in these voter registration books usually contain the following information: name; street address; state or country of birth; race; age; signature of voter; and number of years resident of the county and the state.

Please note that these books do not cover the city of St. Louis.

To request a look-up in these volumes, contact associate archivist Dennis Northcott. Please provide the person's name, street address, and the approximate time frame in which the individual resided at that address.

NEW FOLD3.COM VIEWER

We are excited to announce the release of our new and improved Fold3 Viewer! Don't let the new, clutter free interface fool you, this new viewer is faster and more feature rich than our old viewer.

Here are some highlights of our new viewer:

• More intuitive user interface
• Faster image browsing
• Easily save images to your Bookmarks folder and Gallery
• Improved Annotation tools
• Save in high resolution JPG or as PDF with source information
• Save to your Ancestry Tree
• Advanced keyboard shortcuts for power users
• And much, much more.

In addition to these features, the new Viewer uses the latest HTML 5 technology. This means that you no longer need the Flash plugin installed. It is also designed to be very mobile friendly, so if you are using Fold3 on your phone or tablet browser, you will have all the same great features that you enjoy on your desktop.

When you launch the new Viewer for the first time, it will take you to a brief guided tour to familiarize you with the new design. You can revisit the tour information at any time by clicking on the Help icon on the Viewer toolbar.

We have also revamped our Fold3 Training Center to help you acclimate to our new viewer. Help topics include:

• Viewing Documents
• Print & Download
• Annotating Documents
• Bookmarks
• Save to Ancestry
• Save Location

If you haven't had a chance to try out our viewer, go kick the tires and let us know what you think by selecting the Feedback icon at the bottom right. Also, keep an eye on the Viewer because we aren't done yet! We will be adding more exciting functionality over the next few weeks.

GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY OF BOONE COUNTY AND CENTRAL MISSOURI

Our society recently changed its name from Genealogical Society of Central Missouri. Our new name more clearly reflects the main focus of our records and library holdings.

We also just celebrated our 40th anniversary!

Thank you!

Nancy Waller Thomas, webmanager
Genealogical Society of Boone County and Central Missouri

Monday, October 05, 2015

FLAGS AT THE MISSOURI STATE MUSEUM

As curator of the 445 flags in the collections of the Missouri State Museum, Katherine Owens has seen firsthand the emotions connected to the sometimes torn and tattered pieces of fabric.
The collection includes various flags dating from the Seminole War (1837) to Afghanistan (2003):

LINK

OCTOBER EVENTS AT MGC

The Midwest Genealogy Center is offering the following activities for the month of October. The Genealogy Center is located at 3440 S. Lee's Summit Road, Independence. All activities are free, but registration is required, call 816-252-7228.

Charles Clancy and Union Station, 7 p.m. Oct. 6. Union Station in Kansas City opened its doors at 2 p.m. Oct. 30, 1914. Charles Clancy, who had worked at the old Union Depot, was hired as assistant station master. He would eventually become the stationmaster until his retirement in August 1955. Jim "Two Crows" Wallen, portraying Charles Clancy, will share stories of the fascinating 100 years of history of the station, including construction, the wrestling of a steer in Grand Hall, the Union Station Massacre, and many other exciting tales.

Beginning Genealogy, 2 p.m. Oct. 6. Find out the fundamentals of beginning your genealogical research project. We will discuss organization, census information, vital records, and where to look for information.

Hidden Treasures at MGC, 2 p.m. Oct. 8. This detailed tour will demonstrate how to utilize our archives, search for articles in our periodical section, the Swem's Virginia Historical Index, and the Filby lists. We will also showcase microfilm records from the Family History Library, Ante-Bellum Southern Plantations, Pinkerton's National Detective Agency, Corbin Manuscripts, Draper Manuscripts, Calvert Papers, and we'll explore city directories in several different formats. This class is an intermediate level class, but advanced genealogists will make some amazing discoveries.

Beginning Census Records, 10 a.m. Oct. 13. Learn to search thousands of family and local history books and the complete U.S. Federal Census from 1790 to 1940. Census records can be searched by name, place of birth, age, ethnicity, and more.

German Research Discussion Group, 2 p.m. Oct. 17. The German Research Discussion Group presents and preserves genealogical information about the German regions, traces German ancestors, and fosters a better understanding of the lives they led. This group will allow the exchange of information and help keep members abreast of issues and updates. The group relies on each individual to participate and discuss the subject matter they know best. Meetings are held quarterly. All skill levels are welcome.

Revenge, Retaliation and Retribution, 7 p.m. Oct. 20. Learn about the reality of the Brigade of Jayhawkers led by Gen. James Henry Lane and the campaign of destruction and devastation they caused across western Missouri in 1861. It was a time of retaliation for the destruction during the epoch of Bleeding Kansas. Nothing was safe, homes, barns, outbuildings, fencing, and businesses. All were passionately destroyed by fire and very little survived.

Beginning Internet Genealogy, 7 p.m. Oct. 21. This class focuses on evaluating websites and will introduce some of the best genealogy sites on the web.

Beginning Ancestry Library Edition, 2 p.m. Oct. 22. Search the U.S. Federal Census from 1790 to 1940, as well as immigration, vital, military, court, church, and ethnic records. Explore city directories, Social Security Death Index, and more.

MISSOURI’S CIVIL WAR

Though many people visualize Virginia or Georgia when they think of famous Civil War battles, Dr. Jeremy Neely, history instructor at Missouri State University, wants to shed light on the significance of Missouri during the last war on American soil. His new Massive Open Online Course (MOOC), Missouri’s Civil War, begins Oct. 19. Neely’s free course will address military, political and social history, and focus on Missouri due to the number of engagements that took place within the state. Missouri is a particularly interesting study, noted Neely, because of the political and military division within the state.

LINK

Saturday, October 03, 2015

DO YOU NEED WINDOWS 10?

The answer, not surprisingly, is maybe:

LINK

THE CCC PAVILION AT CROWLEY’S RIDGE STATE PARK

Most of the Arkansas Delta ranks among the lesser scenic regions of the Natural State.

But the monotony of the flat landscapes inland from the Mississippi River is broken by the distinctive geological intrusion of Crowley's Ridge.

Varying from 1 to 12 miles wide, the ridge rises 250 feet above the flood plain. Along its crest runs a National Scenic Byway, so designated in 1998. Crowley's Ridge Parkway extends 218 miles north from Helena-West Helena, with the last 10 miles going into Missouri. It shifts among more than a dozen federal, state and county roads on its way through eight Arkansas counties.

LINK

HONORING THE CCC AT EAGLE RIVER

Members of the Civilian Conservation Corps endured extreme conditions for very little pay during the Great Depression. Those hard working men of the CCC were honored at Eagle River (WI) with the dedication of a life-size bronze statue of a CCC worker. As of Sunday, there are 64 of these statues across the county. Three of them are in Wisconsin.

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CIVIL WAR FINANCING AND LEGISLATION

Extensive timeline:

LINK

CIVIL WAR MOVERS AND SHAKERS

Congressional firebrands, 1850-1880:

LINK

Wednesday, September 30, 2015

THE ONLINE BOOKS PAGE

If you like ebooks (and Lord knows I do), you’ll love this site with its listings of over 2 million ebooks (all free!) available on the Web:

LINK

TEACHING WITH PRIMARY SOURCES: THE CONFEDERACY

Online resource sponsored by Eastern Illinois University:

LINK

THE GLAMOROUS STEAMBOAT LIFE

Life on a typical 19th century steamboat was anything but:

LINK

CIVIL WAR TECH

A new educational program aimed at elementary school students will explore the technology of the Civil War era.

The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum in Springfield kicks off the series this weekend. The first "Civil War Tech" event on Saturday will focus on how bugles and drums were used to signal troops in battle.

Other sessions in the series are planned on photography, railroads, submarines, surveillance balloons and hospitals. The program will take place once a month on Saturday mornings. The schedule and ticket information are available on the museum's website.

The Lincoln museum celebrates its 10th anniversary this year. AT&T Inc. is supporting the "Civil War Tech" program.

More info

GERMAN-AMERICAN DAY CELEBRATION

Hallo! I want to invite ALL my friends to German-American Day this Sunday. The only thing more German than an Oktoberfest is a celebration of German-American Day! The Germans of the St. Louis region will celebrate their annual German-American Day (October 6) on Sunday, October 4th, from 1 - 4 p.m. inside the beautiful St. Louis German Cultural Society Hall at 3652 Jefferson Avenue in St. Louis, MO 63118. Free fun and Free Parking! Please share and invite ALL your friends by forwarding this email! Let's celebrate our German Heritage with all of its traditions!

In 1983, President Reagan proclaimed October 6 as German-American Day to celebrate and honor the 300th anniversary of German American immigration to the U.S.. In 1987, Congress approved the National holiday designating October 6 as German-American Day, at which time the President called on Americans to observe the day with appropriate ceremonies and activities. The St. Louis’ German-American Committee will do exactly that and the festivities will begin with St. Louis’ own Honorary German Consul Lansing Hecker. Come and enjoy the wine (Raffle) and beer and pretzels or the Kaffee (free) and Kuchen!

SCHEDULE FOR THE DAY

1:00 Lansing Hecker – Honorary German Counsel will open the festivities!
1:10 Liederkranz (Mixed chorus) will sing
1:20 Joined by the German Cultural Society's Damenchor (Women's Chorus)
1:40 Dammenchor
2:00 St. Charles German Heritage Club* – German Fashion Show
2:30 German Cultural Society's Jugendgruppe (Young people's group) will dance
3:00 Deutscher Mannerchor (Men's Chorus) will sing
3:30 Froehliche Schuhplattler - Dance group will dance

* St. Louis-Stuttgart Sister Cities – Photographic Display of Stuttgart
* Germanic Genealogical Special Interest Group – Genealogical Research
* Stammtisch –– Doing what they do best – talking!
* Badischer Unterstuetzungverein –- History
* Missouri Germans Consortium –Book Signings – Authors Jim Merkel and Dorris Keeven-Franke
* German Cultural Center –– Teacher and Educational Resources
* St. Louis Bosseln League – Demonstrations
* German School Association
* St. Charles – Ludwigsburg Sister City
* Volksmarch
* Schuetzenverein

More information on the web at mo-germans.com

Dorris Keeven-Franke or 636.221.1524

Sunday, September 27, 2015

FACES FROM THE PAST

If you’re having trouble dating any 19th century photos, this video can help you guesstimate the age of five types of 19th century photos:

LINK

CLOUD GENEALOGY: A SHORT GLOSSARY

Short but helpful intro to cloud computing:

LINK

FAST FACTS ABOUT U.S. VETERANS

Interesting, sometimes disheartening facts about our veterans and the care they (sometimes) receive from the DVA:

LINK

Thursday, September 24, 2015

SIX HIDDEN GEMS IN FAMILYSEARCH.ORG

Record sets of interest to persons researching ancestors from China; Mexico; Puerto Rico; plus Confederate Officers Card Index 1861-1865 and U.S. Public Records 1970-2009.

LINK

CCC CAMP AT BACA CANYON

A Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Camp was established at the location (in New Mexico). After it was vacated, the place was also used as a National Youth Administration (NYA) camp. It was then used as a Japanese-American Internment Camp during World War II.

LINK

ROSCOMMON CCC MUSEUM

Two northern Michigan history museums opened their seasonal doors to visitors this spring — The Hartwick Pines Logging Museum in Grayling and the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Museum in Roscommon.

LINK

YOUR AFFECTIONATE SON

A piece of history has found a home at Missouri State University West Plains.

John Arnold, a sergeant for the Union during the Civil War, penned over 50 letters from 1860 to 1864. Most of them are addressed to "mother and father" and signed "your affectionate son".

West Plains resident Chuck Kimberlin donated the entire set of letters to the university.

LINK

DAR OFFERS FREE ONLINE RESEARCH TOOLS

It provides seven databases that contain a wealth of information to help potential DAR members complete membership applications, but even genealogists who do not plan to join DAR may find valuable information on their ancestors.

LINK

Tuesday, September 22, 2015

HAVE SKILLS, WILL TRAVEL

Can’t get to NPRC, but need to get some military records research done? Here’s a list of researchers who can do it for you (for a price, of course):

LINK

Perhaps you need somebody who can research the civilian records held in St. Louis instead:

LINK

Or check these lists, should you need research done at some other NARA facilities:

LINK

SEVEN WAYS SUMMER VACATIONS HAVE CHANGED

When you are moving forward in history, as we living people do, it is extremely difficult to keep track of all the things that have changed significantly during our lifetimes. That goes double for this time of spectacular ongoing technological innovation:

LINK

PRIVACY ISSUES FOR FAMILY HISTORIANS

Thoughtful discussion of factors to consider when deciding whether or not to include potentially sensitive info in a family history book or online tree:

LINK

THOUGHTS ON SOCIAL SECURITY

The origins of the system:

LINK

VIRGINIA GENEALOGY FAST FACTS

Here are nine key details you need to know when tracing Virginia ancestors:

1. Statehood: 1788

2. Colony founded: 1607

3. First extant federal census: 1810 (partial)

4. Available colonial censuses: 1624-1625, 1782, 1783, 1784, 1785, 1786 (1700s censuses are partial)

5. Statewide birth, death and marriage records begin: 1830

6. State-land state (as an original colony, the state rather than the federal government had authority over selling off land to individuals)

7. Counties: 95

8. Independent cities: 39

9. Contact for vital records: Virginia Department of Health, Office of Vital Records and Health Statistics, Box 1000, Richmond, VA 23218, (804) 662-6200

(Courtesy of Family Tree University e-newsletter)

Saturday, September 19, 2015

EVENTS AT MGC

Beginning Genealogy
October 6 at 2:00 p.m.

Find out the fundamentals of beginning your genealogical research project. We will discuss organization, census information, vital records, and where to look for information. This is a beginning level class.

Revenge, Retaliation, & Retribution
October 20 at 7:00 p.m.

Learn about the reality of the Brigade of Jayhawkers led by General James Henry Lane and the campaign of destruction and devastation they caused across western Missouri in 1861. It was a time of retaliation for the destruction during the epoch of Bleeding Kansas. Nothing was safe, homes, barns, outbuildings, fencing, and businesses and were passionately destroyed by fire and very little survived.

MGC

AMERICAN MILITARY CASUALTIES & BURIALS

NARA Finding Aid:

LINK

DRUMMING OUT

Are you familiar with the historical military practice of drumming a soldier out of the army?

This process of dishonorably discharging a soldier had its origins in the British army in the 17th century and was later picked up by the American military. Soldiers could be drummed out for a variety of reasons, from thievery to desertion.

Usually, during a drumming out, the guilty man’s head was shaved, the insignia and buttons taken from his uniform, and a sign detailing his crime hung around his neck. Sometimes he was dressed in felon’s clothes or white feathers were placed above his ears, and other times a rope was put around his neck and he would be led by the smallest drummer boy. The convict would then be marched between the lines of his fellow soldiers to the tune of “Rogue’s March,” and he would be taken to the entrance of the camp, where he was sent on his way with orders to never return.

“Rogue’s March” was often played by drums and fifes, though if they couldn’t be found, a trumpet was sometimes substituted and the process was called being “blown out” of the army. During the Civil War, “Yankee Doodle” was sometimes played instead of “Rogue’s March.”

The point of drumming out a soldier was to make his departure from the military humiliating enough that others would be discouraged from committing the same crime. So in addition to being drummed out, the local newspaper would sometimes write about the man’s crime to make it public. However, drumming out eventually fell out of favor as a punishment, and by World War II it had largely been dropped altogether in the U.S.

FOLD3.COM

MHM USABILITY STUDY

The Missouri History Museum's web office is running a usability study. In an effort to improve our website, we're looking for people who may be interested in trying out museum-related websites and giving their feedback. Qualifying participants will receive a $10 gift certificate to the Missouri History Museum gift shop.

What Will I Be Doing?
Participants will be asked to do several short tasks using our website and answer questions about their experience and perceptions of the site.

How Long Will This Take?
Not long at all! Sessions will last about an hour.

When:
Weekdays, Monday, October 5, through Friday, November 6, from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Where: MHM's Goldstein Conference Room

Interested in Participating? Call (314) 367-9038 to schedule your session.

Wednesday, September 16, 2015

LAST OF THE CIVIL WAR VETERANS

Story with numerous photos of these aging heroes:

LINK

RHODE ISLAND SHIPWRECKS

Animation on the opening screen for this website is so cool—I could watch it for hours!

LINK

THE CIVIL WAR IN DALLAS COUNTY

When the Civil War began in 1861, the majority of Dallas County residents supported the Union. As such, there were no Confederate companies organized within Dallas County boundaries. However, some did leave the county to fight for the Confederate cause.

Men from Dallas County fought in several Union regiments. These included: Company 1, 8th Regiment, Missouri Volunteer Infantry, which included Lt. Thomas Franklin and James M. Reeser, raised in September 1862, and Company D, 15th Regiment, Missouri Volunteer Cavalry under Capt. T.B. Sutherland in November 1863, whose responsibility was to clear the county of bushwhackers.

LINK

EVERYTHING GERMAN IN ST. LOUIS

The only thing more German than an Oktoberfest is a celebration of German-American Day ! The Germans of St. Louis will celebrate their annual German-American Day (October 6) on Sunday, October 4th, from 1 - 4 p.m. inside its’ own beautiful St. Louis German Cultural Society Hall at 3652 Jefferson Avenue in St. Louis, MO 63118. In 1983, President Reagan proclaimed October 6 as German-American Day to celebrate and honor the 300th anniversary of German American immigration to the U.S. In 1987, Congress approved the National holiday designating October 6 as German-American Day, at which time the President called on Americans to observe the day with appropriate ceremonies and activities. The St. Louis’ German-American Committee will do exactly that and the festivities will begin with St. Louis’ own Honorary German Consul Lansing Hecker.

Everything German in St. Louis

All of the German-American organizations of St. Louis and St. Charles County will be represented, featuring German music, dancing, fun and food. You are invited to join the St. Louis German Cultural Society, Deutscher Männerchor, The German School Association, the German American Heritage Society of St. Louis, the St. Charles German Heritage Club, the St. Louis-Stuttgart Sister Cities, The St. Louis German Cultural Society’s Damenchor, the St. Louis area Stammtisch groups, the Liederkranz,

D’Froeliche Schuhplattler and many more. The new Official St. Louis Bösseln Association will be there recruiting new leagues. The Missouri German Consortium will have two local authors, Jim Merkel with his book Beer, Brats and Baseball; and Dorris Keeven-Franke with her book Utopia- Revisiting a German State in America. The German Cultural Center will share their educational resources for both students and teachers. The St. Louis-Stuttgart Sister Cities will take you on a photographic tour of the City of Stuttgart Germany! The Germanic Genealogy Special Interest Group will have computers and help you discover your German heritage!

Music, Dancing, Fashion Show, Raffle Prizes

An afternoon of German entertainment on the stage will include the Liederkranz Singing Society, the St. Louis German Cultural Society’s Damenchor (Women’s Choir), a fashion show of traditional and contemporary German clothing showcased by the St. Charles German Heritage Club, and the St. Louis German Cultural Society’s Jugendgruppe (Youth Group), the Männerchor (Men’s Choral group) and D’Froeliche Schuhplattler. German refreshments will be available as well, and German Gemütlichkeit will abound. Everyone is invited to a free afternoon of fun, a chance to win GREAT raffle prizes and celebrate our great German heritage! Willkommen!

For more information see http://mo-germans.com/2015/09/15/germanamericanday/ or call 636-221-1524.

Monday, September 14, 2015

CAUGHT IN THE DRAFT

A contract worker at NPRC has admitted that he mutilated and discarded WWII draft records he was supposed to be digitizing for Ancestry.com:

LINK

SHARED STORIES OF THE CIVIL WAR

Pratt Public Library (KS) and the Pratt County Historical Society will host “Shared Stories of the Civil War: Readers’ Theater,” a script reading and discussion led by Anne Hawkins on Sept. 29 at 7 p.m. in the Oneita Johnson Auditorium at the Pratt Public Library. Members of the community are invited to attend the free program.

LINK

MISSOURI HISTORY MUSEUM UPDATE

Researching the History of Your House

Learn how to research the history of your home with Missouri History Museum associate archivist Dennis Northcott. See what discoveries can be found about your home and its former residents in old maps, directories, census records, historic photos, and more.

When: Saturday, October 17, 7 p.m.
Where: Ritz Park, 3147 South Grand Blvd.
How much: Free

Finding Your Ancestors in St. Louis-Area Newspapers

Historic newspapers are packed with information about our ancestors, including local news, real estate transfers, legal notices, business advertisements, and announcements of births, marriages, and deaths. Missouri History Museum associate archivist Dennis Northcott will show examples of the genealogical gems published in St. Louis-area newspapers, from the city’s first paper in 1808 to modern times. Dennis will also cover notable indexed and digitized newspapers, and tips on how to use these resources most effectively.

When: Saturday, October 31, 10:30 a.m.
Where: Missouri History Museum (Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park)
How much: Free

Sunday, September 13, 2015

KANDER ABOUT THE ARCHIVES

Secretary of State Jason Kander weighs in on the Missouri State Archives and Missouri Digital Heritage:

LINK

YOUNG & SAVVY

Does your genealogical society skew young and savvy, or does it skew more 19th century? If it skews towards 1900, this blogger thinks you’d better change or wither on the vine:

LINK

NEW DECORATION REGULATION

Trying to replace lost/missing military medals? There’s a new Army regulation covering that:

LINK

ROSIE RALLY

Richmond (Va) just set a world record for most women/girls dressed as Rosie the Riveter gathered together in one place (yes, there’s a record for that):

LINK

Monday, September 07, 2015

NOW YOU SEE ‘EM…

Short histories of nine countries you won’t be visiting in the future—they don’t exist anymore:

LINK

SIX QUIRKY ITEMS IN THE INDIANA STATE ARCHIVES COLLECTION

Including mug shots of a very famous criminal:

LINK

DOES THE U.S. NEED TO APOLOGIZE FOR SLAVERY?

Should the U.S. apologize for the fact that slavery existed in this country until 1865? Before you answer, consider these talking points:

1. We learned this economic system from other countries (among them Spain and Portugal) in which it existed for centuries before being adopted by English-speaking countries;

2. American slavery could not have existed without the willing complicity of the black African elite;

3. Slavery continued to exist in other countries (Brazil and Cuba to name two) after it was abolished in the U.S.;

4. The death of more than 360,000 (mostly white) Union soldiers in the violent struggle to free the slaves (and the subsequent suffering of the families of those soldiers) is all the apology/contrition that any rational person would consider necessary.

What do you think?

SHOULD THE APOLOGIES END?

This writer thinks Japan should stop apologizing for WWII atrocities, and start telling the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth about what really happened during that world-wide conflagration:

LINK

Wednesday, September 02, 2015

REVOLUTIONARY WAR VETS OF MISSOURI

A list providing vet’s name and county of residence transcribed from, "Year Book of the Sons of the Revolution in the State of Missouri 1896" (Woodward &Tiernan Printing Company, St. Louis):

LINK

GRIERSON’S RAID?

Why the question mark? Benjamin Grierson certainly led that most successful Civil War cavalry raid in 1863, but whose idea was it in the first place?

LINK


QUICK GUIDE TO FEDERAL NATURALIZATION RECORDS AT NARA-KC

Just what it says:

LINK

WILL COUNTY DIGITIZATION PROJECT

Here at the Plainfield Public Library I have recently revamped my genealogy pages to add a bunch of new digital content for Plainfield and Will county. Some of it is currently available, but much more is to come.

LINK

We have also created a site which should be back up and running soon called Will County: Preserving History's Heritage which has Will County info including an index to all property transactions in Will County from 1836-1885. The same info is also available through the Illinois Digital Archives which is a free site that has resources for the entire state.

Tina Beaird
Reference Librarian
Plainfield Public Library

Saturday, August 29, 2015

ABOUT JIMMY CARTER…

What will they say about Jimmy Carter’s presidency? Well, let’s just say he won’t make the top 10...

What will they say about his ex-presidency? Well, let’s just say that President Obama would be a fool not to take a close look at what many historians are calling a model ex-presidency:

LINK

JEFFERSON COUNTY, MISSOURI HISTORY & FAMILIES

Last Opportunity to Pre-Order
Jefferson County, Missouri History & Families Book

The deadline to pre-order this limited edition, 8 ? x 11, hardbound, indexed, heirloom quality book is September 30, 2015 for $54.95 (standard edition) or $89.95 (deluxe edition) + $6.50 for shipping for each book ordered.

Optional name embossing (up to 24 characters, including spaces) on either edition by *pre-order only* is only an additional $6.00 per book.

The book goes to the printer on October 1st. A limited number of *the standard editions will be available after the release date in December, 2015. However, the price will increase to $65.00 + $10.00 for shipping. Embossing will not be an option.

Please visit our website, www.jcgsmo.org, to download an order form. Don’t delay and miss getting this limited edition book for your family or organization.

Christine Merseal
Jefferson County Genealogical Society

MISSOURI MINES STATE HISTORIC SITE

Exhibits, presentations and free museum admission will highlight the Old Mine Open House at Missouri Mines State Historic Site in Park Hills. The open house will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 12 at the museum.

Admission to the site and its mining and mineral museum will be free during the open house. The site’s museum contains exhibits on geology and mineral resources, a mineral collection, and pieces of restored underground mining equipment.

Missouri Mines State Historic Site is located in Park Hills on the south side of Highway 32 at the Flat River Drive overpass. For more information about the event, call the site at 573-431-6226.

SEPTEMBER EVENTS AT NARA-KC


- An author lecture on We Were Hanging by a Thread by Ann Brownfield and David Jackson on Wednesday, September 9 at 6:30 p.m.
- One day facility closure on Wednesday, September 16
- An author lecture on The Buffalo Soldiers: Their Epic Story and Major Campaigns by Dr. Debra Sheffer on Wednesday, September 23 at 6:30 p.m.
- A new film series focusing on 20th Century Civil Rights and Liberties debuting Thursday, October 1 at 6:30 p.m.
- An evening lecture on Harry Truman and Dwight Eisenhower: Myths and Realities of the Civil Rights Struggle with Irwin F. Gellman on Thursday, October 8 at 6:30 p.m.

More info: kansascity.educate@nara.gov

Wednesday, August 26, 2015

SEPTEMBER EVENTS AT MGC

The Midwest Genealogy Center is offering the following activities for the month of September. Genealogy Center is located at 3440 S. Lee's Summit Road, Independence. All activities are free, but registration is required, unless otherwise noted, call 816-252-7228.

Beginning Census Records, 7 p.m. Sept. 2. Learn to search thousands of family and local history books and the complete U.S. Federal Census from 1790 to 1940. Census records can be searched by name, place of birth, age, ethnicity, and more. This is a beginning level class.

Using FamilySearch, 10 a.m. Sept. 10. Learn tips on searching records, using the research wiki, finding family trees, using the Family History catalog, and more. This is a beginning level class.

Beginning Genealogy, 10 a.m. Sept. 12. Find out the fundamentals of beginning your genealogical research project. Topics: Organization, census information, vital records, and where to look for information.

Beginning Internet Genealogy, 10 a.m. Sept. 14. This class focuses on evaluating websites and will introduce some of the best genealogy sites on the web.

KC Garment District: Piecing Together the Past, 7 p.m. Sept. 15. Local historian David W. Jackson presents insights into the fascinating industry that clothed America with stylish garments that were “Made in Kansas City, U.S.A.” The KC Garment District once represented the largest market of coats and suits in the U.S., second only to Chicago. Explore the history, and find out what is left of the industry and the district today.

Beginning Ancestry Library Edition, 7 p.m. Sept. 16. Search the U.S. Federal Census from 1790 to 1940 as well as immigration, vital, military, court, church, and ethnic records. Explore city directories, Social Security Death Index, and much, much more.

Hidden Treasures at MGC, 7 p.m. Sept. 21. This detailed tour of little-known items in our collection will demonstrate how to utilize our archives, search for articles in our periodical section, the Swem’s Virginia Historical Index, and the Filby lists. We will also showcase microfilm records from the Family History Library, Ante-Bellum Southern Plantations, Pinkerton’s National Detective Agency, Corbin Manuscripts, Draper Manuscripts, Calvert Papers, and we’ll explore city directories in several different formats. This class is an intermediate level class, but more advanced genealogists will make some discoveries.

Using HeritageQuest, 10 a.m. Sept. 23. Learn to search thousands of family and local history books, the complete U.S. Federal Census from 1790 to 1940, and much more. Heritage Quest Online features a new every-name Census index, improved navigation, and many exciting new features. Census records can be searched by name, place of birth, age, and ethnicity. This is a beginning level class.

Walkabout at MGC, 2 p.m. Sept. 25. Learn about all the valuable resources available for genealogy and history research. Each department will be explored as we tour the building, displays, periodicals, microforms, rare books, maps, and more. This is a beginning level class.

Using InterLibrary Loan for Genealogy, 7 p.m. Sept. 29. Learn how to order microfilmed newspapers from across the country, books from other libraries, and films from the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah. This class covers Internet sources and archival research. This is a beginning level class.

LINK

Tuesday, August 25, 2015

FIVE THINGS ONLY MIDDLE CHILDREN WILL UNDERSTAND

I was a middle child (older and younger brother), and completely agree with this list, except maybe No. 5:--on occasion during my childhood I did NOT feel lucky to have those brothers:

LINK


FINDING YOUR ANCESTORS IN MILITARY RECORDS

I’m still feeling the afterglow from this year’s NGS conference (plus my Uncle Robert’s kids live in the area), so I’m wishing I could attend this workshop in Stockton, CA:

LINK


A COSMIC THANK-YOU GIFT

Occasionally virtue is its own reward, as four musical Indiana GIs discovered in a very unexpected way:

LINK



GRAFFITI BRIDGE

A U.S. airman in WWII England etched his name, hometown, and the date (August 24, 1943) in wet concrete, and English volunteers are now contacting his 100 year old wife (who just renewed her driver’s license) regarding this shout-out from the past:

LINK


GOGGLE ADVANCED IMAGE SEARCH

It allows you to apply lots of delimiters, including searching for images that you can use without restrictions:

LINK

Saturday, August 22, 2015

RESEARCH PLAN TEMPLATE

This very nice 6-page research plan template created by Angela McGhie is available for free download:

LINK

CREATING DNA CIRCLES

Using a new tool available in AncestryDNA:

LINK

Note: You can also download a great free eBook on this site: I Have the Results of My Genetic Genealogy Test, Now What? (right-side navigation column, about half-way down).

NORTH CAROLINA CONFEDERATE PENSION APPLICATIONS

This free digital collection holds 35,717 applications and contains all of the 1901 pension applications in the custody of the North Carolina State Archives:

LINK


CORNFIELD CONFLAGRATION

On Saturday, Aug. 10, 1861, 154 years ago, the woods and corn fields along Wilson's Creek in southwest Missouri were ringing with the sounds of battle. The booms of cannon and rifles, the pitiful screams of the wounded and dying, the terrified neighing of horses-- it was surely a scene straight out of Dante's Inferno.

LINK


Thursday, August 20, 2015

GET ORGANIZED!

Nicely done newspaper column about the benefits of using Evernote in your genealogy research:

LINK

SHUTTING THE DOORS ON ILLINOIS HISTORY

Governor Bruce Rauner wants to solve Illinois’s cash-flow problems by shutting down the 138-year old Illinois State Museum and its satellite locations:

LINK

GEORGE TYLER MOORE CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF THE CIVIL WAR

Jim Broomall is the new keeper of the key to a growing repository of service records for more than 20,000 West Virginia and Virginia soldiers who fought in the Civil War at the George Tyler Moore Center for the Study of the Civil War.

The center, a two-story building at 136 W. German St. that was built in 1795, was the home of Conrad Shindler, a great-great-great grandfather of actress Mary Tyler Moore.

LINK

USING ILL FOR GENEALOGY

Midwest Genealogy Center
August 26 at 10:00 a.m.


Do you think MCPL doesn't have everything you are looking for? Use Inter-Library Loan to expand the walls of your library and encompass a world of information. Come learn how to order microfilmed newspapers from across the country, books from other libraries, and films from the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah. This class covers internet sources and archival research. This is a beginning level class.

LINK

Monday, August 17, 2015

NOT WORTH THE PAPER IT’S PRINTED ON?

In 1865 Confederate currency was worthless—but that’s no longer the case:

LINK

DEFINITELY NOT A REGULAR PARTNER

The head of the International Red Cross says that his organization “lost its moral compass” when it came to the Holocaust, because it failed to provide Jewish deportees with the same protections and assistance that were extended to Allied prisoners of war:

LINK

JTA ARCHIVE

From their website:

JTA is the definitive, trusted global source of breaking news and analysis on issues of Jewish interest and concern. We are a not-for-profit organization that prides itself on producing compelling, credible, independent, and high-quality journalism. Our reporting reflects the wide spectrum of religious, political and cultural identity within the Jewish community, with our digital properties serving as a town square where Jews of all stripes can debate with and learn about each other.

LINK

MAKING EVERY LEAF COUNT

Would you like to explore new avenues in finding, documenting, and citing sources in your family history research?

Do you need a new method for organizing and storing genealogical materials from your research?
A special workshop brought to you by the Cedar and Vernon County Missouri Genealogical Society, the Bushwhacker Museum, and The State Historical Society of Missouri, is Aug. 22, from 9 a.m. until noon, at the Bushwhacker Museum, 212 W. Walnut St., Nevada.

The State Historical Society of Missouri's Amy L. Waters, reference specialist, will conduct the workshop and provide tips for finding your family's history and organizing it for future generations.

This workshop is suitable for beginning to advanced genealogists, as well as those who want to learn how to best maintain their family history research.

LINK

COMMONWEALTH WAR GRAVES COMMISSION RECORDS TO BE DIGITIZED

More than half a million British and Empire forces had already been killed in the Great War by the time the Commonwealth War Graves Commission was established to keep an official record of the fallen in May 1917.

Nearly half a million more deaths would follow between then and Armistice Day as the bloodshed of World War I continued on a scale never previously witnessed.

And when Europe slid back into conflict in 1939, the Commission was once again needed to record the fallen.

World War II involved the British public much more directly than the Great War, so the CWGC began to record the names of civilians killed in the Blitz as well as fallen soldiers.

At the request of Winston Churchill, the civilian records were kept secret because the wartime prime minister feared it would hit morale on the home front.

LINK

Tuesday, August 11, 2015

THE FOREVER WAR

Those who fight today’s wars must often feel alone, as the soaring veteran suicide rate attests. Although we have made progress in understanding and treating post-traumatic stress disorder, the understandable human need to set aside the pain, to stay silent, is still wreaking havoc in our society. Many children will grow up as I did, afraid to ask, afraid to elicit nightmares, afraid to know:

LINK

THE CCC IN NORTHERN MICHIGAN

Two area museums have opened once again for the summer and await visitors to come and learn more about some of Michigan's history and natural wonders.

The Hartwick Pines Logging Museum in Grayling and the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Museum in Roscommon both contain a plethora of knowledge and opportunities for education and interaction for people of all ages.

LINK

SHADOWS FROM THE PAST

All those medals in a beautiful shadow box—who had they been awarded to?

LINK

QUEENSLAND KIA RECORDS ARE NOW DIGITIZED

Almost 10,000 hand-written records of Queenslanders killed in World War 1 have been digitised and are now accessible online through the Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages.

Attorney General and Minister for Justice, Yvette D'Ath said that following the war, the then Registrar-General, George Porter, decided to ensure the deaths of the soldiers and nurses were registered.

"There was no statutory requirement to document these events and it was certainly not common practice, but he believed access to an official death certificate might provide bereaved families with some form of closure, given their fallen loved ones were buried overseas or had no known grave," Ms D'Ath said.

LINK

WHAT WERE THEY THINKING?

What news were citizens of the Confederate states receiving as the Civil War progressed? Read all about it in the Richmond (VA) Daily Dispatch (1860-1865):

LINK

GOOGLE IS WATCHING…

You, my friend--if you use Google's services, it's recording everything you do so it can tailor searches and more to how you use the Internet. And, of course, it's using the information to target you with ads:

LINK

Saturday, August 08, 2015

Friday, August 07, 2015

OUR OTHER HEROES

The push lately has certainly been to record the memories of surviving WWII vets, but this letter writer suggests that we start recording the memories of Vietnam vets while there's still time to create an impressive archive of their stories:

LINK

FACES LIKE DEVILS

Missouri Secretary of State Jason Kander today announced a program exploring the history of the 19th century Bald Knobber vigilantes. The program will be held at the Missouri State Archives, a division of his office, on Thursday, August 13, 2015, at 7 p.m. Dr. Matthew J. Hernando will present his new book, Faces Like Devils: The Bald Knobber Vigilantes in the Ozarks.

LINK

CHRONICLES OF DISASTER

On Aug. 6, 1945, an atomic bomb detonated over Hiroshima, destroying the city and killing tens of thousands of people. Three days later, a second bomb exploded over Nagasaki.

In the months that followed this first-ever nuclear attack, Americans sought to understand the destruction the weapon had wrought. Members of the Yale community played important roles in surveying the devastation and describing the bomb’s human toll. The Yale University Library houses archives that offer insight into this grim work.

LINK

UPCOMING CLASSES COURTESY OF ST. LOUIS PUBLIC LIBRARY

Here’s a list of classes I’m doing in August and September at various locations in the St. Louis metro area. Don’t forget, Buder Branch Library has a large free parking lot, and you can park for free on Central Library’s public parking lot.

THURS
AUG 13
7 pm-8:30 pm

Picture This: Finding, Editing, & Filing Images

Tom Pearson shows genealogists how to acquire, file, and do basic editing of photographs and other images. Edwardsville Library, 112 S. Kansas Street, Edwardsville, IL 62025. To register/more information: tpearson@slpl.org.

SAT
AUG 15
2 pm-5 pm

Which Test? The Basics of Genetic Testing for Genealogists

Join us as an expert on the subject (Janine Cloud of FamilyTreeDNA) discusses the types of tests available and the information that they can and can’t provide for genealogists ($30 discount on their tests for attendees—you can purchase tests and do the swab at the talk). Central Library, Carnegie Room, 3rd Floor. Registration is required for this special program. To register/more info: tpearson@slpl.org.

THURS
SEP 10
10:30 am-Noon

Czech-American Service & Sacrifice in the American Civil War

Tom Pearson discusses book, microfilm, manuscript, and Internet sources of information on Czech-American service in the Civil War. Central Library, Training Room, 2nd Floor. To register/more information: tpearson@slpl.org.

THURS
SEP 17
7 pm-8:30 pm

Jail & Prison Records for the Genealogist

Tom Pearson discusses book, manuscript, microfilm, and Internet sources of information on ancestors who “did time” in local, state, and federal institutions. Session also covers POWs, internees, and displaced persons. Morrison Talbott Library, 215 Park Street, Waterloo, IL 62298. To register/more information, tpearson@slpl.org.


SAT
SEP 26
2 pm-3:30 pm

Over There: Researching World War I Soldiers, Sailors, and Airmen

Tom Pearson discusses book, manuscript, microfilm, and Internet sources of information on ancestors who served in World War I. Buder Branch Library, 4401 Hampton Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63109. To register/more information, tpearson@slpl.org.

Tuesday, August 04, 2015

FAMILY TREE MAGAZINE SEPT 2015

Detailed Table of Contents to help you know if you want to buy a copy (print or digital) or check this issue out at a local library:

LINK

Note: You can view Table of Contents (and order a copy if interested) for issues dating back to 2005 here:

LINK

WDYTYA IS BACK!

And here’s a recap of the (warts and all) premiere episode:

LINK

ANOTHER GENEALOGY CONTEST AT GENEABLOGGERS!

The new book Unofficial Guide to FamilySearch.org by Dana McCullough is filled with tips, tricks and clear instructions on how to get the most out of the FamilySearch website. You’ll learn not only about the basics of FamilySearch, but also find out how to use the Wiki, access Apps and more!

Enter the Win a Copy of the Unofficial Guide to FamilySearch.org this week and you could win a FREE copy of this amazing book. We’ll select three winners and each winner can choose the paperback or e-book version. Many thanks to contest sponsor F+W Media, parent company of Family Tree Magazine!

This is a $25.99 value and you could win if you enter by 11:59 pm CDT on Sunday 9 August 2015. Click here to enter!

BE THE FAMILY SHERLOCK

The Ozarks Genealogical Society, Springfield Missouri Fall Conference, “Be the Family Sherlock,” will be held September 11-12, 2015. Featured speaker will be Lisa Louise Cooke, owner of Genealogy Gems, a genealogy and family history multi-media company. She is producer and host of the Genealogy Gems Podcast and the author of four books relating to genealogy research.

Cooke is a much sought after international genealogy speaker. Her podcasts bring genealogy news, research strategies, expert interviews and inspiration to genealogists in 75 countries around the world, and recently celebrated 1.5 million downloads!

The conference will be held at the University Plaza Hotel, 333 S John Q. Hammons Parkway, Springfield, Missouri beginning Friday evening with “The Great Google Earth Game Show” and continuing through Saturday afternoon with three main sessions, one of which is “Using private investigator techniques to find elusive relatives.”

The conference includes vendor exhibits, mini seminars, door prizes, and more. Early registration discount is available through August 31.

Additional information is available at http//:www.ozarksgs.org;

e-mail: conference@ozarksgs.org;

or call 417-861-7503.

Vendors should call 417-865-4945 to reserve space.

Doris Wilson, OGS Publicity Chair
417-890-7528

Sunday, August 02, 2015

BOONE COUNTY TIGERS

This column about the Tigers is the last of 1,662 entries in Life During Wartime, a series that began in the Columbia Tribune on Jan. 2, 2011. The daily columns are being compiled into five hardbound volumes. The first two, for 1861 and 1862, have been published, but only the second volume is available at this time at the Tribune offices. Look for notices of upcoming volumes and opportunities to order the second edition of Volume I.

LINK

AN HONEST AND RESPONSIBLE ATTITUDE

As someone who grew up during the 50s and 60s, it feels weird to side with a spokesperson for a Communist regime, but mainland China has every right to celebrate its successful resistance to Japanese aggression—-although it would be gracious of them to acknowledge the key role American aid played in their success:

A Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson on Wednesday urged Japan to take an honest and responsible attitude towards history and secure the trust of its neighbors through solid actions.

Spokesperson Hua Chunying made the remarks in response to comments made by Japanese Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga on Tuesday regarding China's arrangement to commemorate the 78th anniversary of its eight-year resistance against Japanese invasion. Suga said the commemorative events will not help regional peace and stability.

This year marks the 70th anniversary of the victory of the Chinese People's War of Resistance Against Japanese Aggression and the world war against fascists.

LINK


SWEETHEARTS OF CELL BLOCK B

Two women prisoners arrived at the overcrowded Missouri State Penitentiary today from Gratiot Street Military Prison in St. Louis (30 July 1865), now almost empty as the government sought to cut costs.

Unlike most of the other federal prisoners sent to Jefferson City, the women’s names are not included in the online database of penitentiary prisoners maintained by the Missouri State Archives.

The penitentiary, with cell space for 356 inmates, already held more than 600 because of the effort to empty federal military prisons to cut costs. Every prisoner being held for a set term of months or years was being moved to state custody.

LINK

SWEDISH GENEALOGY WORKSHOP

Are you interested in researching your Swedish ancestors? The world of genealogy is changing quickly and new technologies have made it easier than ever to build your Swedish family tree! With the help of instructors Dee and Ray Kleinow, beginning and intermediate genealogists will gain the tools needed to begin connecting the branches and stories in your family tree. We’ll cover the basics of Swedish genealogy through demonstrations using Swedish computer databases, internet research and the Swedish Parish record databases such as Genline (now part of Ancestry.com International), Archives Digital, EmiWeb, and more.

Please bring a bag lunch or plan to purchase one from FIKA, ASI’s cafe. The required textbook, Your Swedish Roots, can be purchased through the ASI Museum Store (Minneapolis, Mn) in person during open hours or by phone (612-870-3364) – please purchase the textbook prior to the workshop, as the Museum Store does not open until noon on Fridays.

Registration is required by October 16 for this October 23 workshop. Space is limited.

Swedish Genealogy Workshop

Registration Phone: 612-871-4907
Cost: Members: $55.00
Cost: Non-Members: $65.00
Full Schedule: Friday, October 23 ― 9 a.m.–4 p.m.


HELLENIC GENEALOGY CONFERENCE

People researching their Greek family history will gather in Salt Lake City on Saturday, September 26, 2015, for a full day of lectures and activities. This is the first-ever Greek genealogy conference held in the western U.S. The event will be held at the Hellenic Memorial Building (Holy Trinity Cathedral) 279 South 300 West, Salt Lake City, UT 84101, from 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

LINK

Thursday, July 30, 2015

FINDING YOUR WAY IN IRELAND

Know the Irish county of origin, but not the parish? Here’s some good advice:

LINK


BIG AND BRIGHT

Researching Texas ancestors? This blog post will help:

LINK

FRANKIE MEYER ON THE JOY OF GENEALOGY

She writes a regular column for the Joplin Globe:

Recently, a lady named Sally told me that she had paid to join a genealogy website and within a week had traced her family history back to the 1600s, printed it and put it in a notebook.

Hopefully, Sally will maintain her enthusiasm, become more curious about her ancestors and will learn that a family history includes more than dates, places and names, and that it must be documented.

LINK

CANADA’S KOREAN WAR VETS

Canada’s Korean War veterans had to keep fighting for 60 years after the war’s end to receive the full-fledged recognition they deserved.

On Monday, Korean War Veterans Day paid tribute to the efforts of the Canadians who fought – and the 516 of them who died – while supporting the fight for freedom on the Korean Peninsula during the 1950s.

LINK

LANDSCAPES OF MEMORY

Clay County's "landscapes of memory" are revealed to new generations in a book to be released Aug. 3. "Images of America: West Point and Clay County, Mississippi" is a recent addition to Arcadia Publishing's Images series, which chronicles the history of small towns across the country.

LINK

VIRGINIA’S YOUTH CC

While many teens were enjoying a summer off, some are hard at work improving the quality of Virginia's state parks, and just so you know, they all voluntarily accepted their positions.

The Virginia Youth Conservation Corps is made up of boys and girls ages 14-17 from all across Virginia, some even come from out of state. They were scheduled to work through the summer and experience things program leaders said they could never experience working at the neighborhood ice-cream joint.

LINK

PLACE NAMES IN PHELPS COUNTY

It has been said that behind every name there is a story. In Phelps County, the stories of how its towns got their names are as colorful and interesting as the people who reside in them.

LINK

Tuesday, July 28, 2015

GETTING READY TO DITCH YOUR LANDLINE?

You should probably read this before you do:

LINK

HANNIBAL’S OTHER ATTRACTION

Hannibal will be forever linked to a man known for his writing, rather than his participation in the Civil War. Hannibal’s connection to the “war between the states” will be better known in the future, thanks to the City Council’s recent decision to partner with the Missouri Civil War Heritage Foundation.

LINK

A BEAR CUB AND A MUSIC MACHINE

Eighty years ago this month, 20 solitary miles beyond Magdalena on the Plains of San Agustín, a large camp began to take shape.

Populated by lonely young men far from home, this remote outpost was known as DG-42-N. It was built by the Civilian Conservation Corps as a home base for their area project, a big part of which was to protect and improve an important New Mexico asset: the Magdalena Stock Driveway.

LINK

IBEW MAGAZINES

Tip courtesy of the Missouri History Museum:

Magazines of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) are available on the IBEW website for the years 1893 to present. These issues are not keyword searchable; rather, you can select a year and browse through individual issues.

ELECTRONIC RECORDS GRANT TO MISSOURI STATE ARCHIVES

Missouri Secretary of State Jason Kander Monday announced the Records Services Division of his office was awarded an electronic records grant of $31,690 by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC), the grant-making affiliate of the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA):

LINK

Sunday, July 26, 2015

IS THAT PERIODICAL IN THE PUBLIC DOMAIN?

The confusing answer is maybe:

Many books published in the U.S. between 1923 and 1963 are actually in the public domain, since the author/publisher neglected to renew the item’s copyright protection, and such renewals were not automatic. It’s also relatively easy to determine if copyright on such an item was renewed or not.

A periodical published between 1923 and 1963, however, is a different story. Why? Because it’s not just the publisher of the periodical who can renew copyright: authors of articles in the periodical may have renewed copyright on their own individual contributions:

LINK

THE SHRINKING PUBLIC DOMAIN

Mega-colossal companies with a stake in copyright ownership keep pushing for longer and longer periods of copyright protection, to the financial detriment of poor schlubs like you and me:

LINK

WAS YOUR FAMILY NAME CHANGED AT ELLIS ISLAND?

Please, people: let’s put this hoary old chestnut out of its misery once and for all: the answer is NO.

Clerks at Ellis Island did not record names of arriving passengers: they in fact matched passengers to a ship manifest prepared in the old country by shipping company employees. Look closely at some manifests—you can often actually see the checkmarks made by Ellis Island clerks as they matched an arrival to the manifest.

You will also sometimes see names lined out on the manifest—such persons either failed to board the ship in the old country, or died on the way to America and were (generally) buried at sea:

LINK

DON’T MESS WITH THE DEAD!

Doing some cemetery recons as part of your summer vacation? Read this list of do’s and don’ts first:

LINK


HEMP BALES HUBBUB

The Missouri State Guard flag has been removed from the state historic site at Lexington, Mo.:

LINK

THE STATUS OF CONFEDERATE VETS

There’s some controversy about a 1958 law that granted a federal pension to 1,000 widows of Confederate veterans:

LINK

Friday, July 24, 2015

A PENSION FOR A DESERTER

The strange odyssey of Union Army Pvt. James Early White:

LINK

WWII FOR LOC

Preserving the stories of remaining WWII vets for the Library of Congress, one story at a time:

LINK

GALLANTS AT GALLIPOLI

Ancestors of some well-known Australian actors served honorably in Anzac forces during WWI:

LINK

A MODEL ARCHIVE

Illinois State University grad student Tammy Hansen’s master’s thesis is a well-written, thorough, and candid look at the history of university archives in Illinois and what changes we can all make to better collect and preserve our institutional history.

LINK

LINCOLN AND THE JEWS

The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum is introducing an exhibit showcasing Lincoln’s relationships with the Jewish population during the Civil War-era.

The exhibit is called “With Firmness in the Right: Lincoln and the Jews.” It focuses on Lincoln’s role in advocating for acceptance and inclusion for Jews in America. The exhibit also examines how Jewish friends and colleagues of Lincoln affected his life. Several sources, such as the Library of Congress and the Chicago Historical Society, contributed documents, photographs, letters and other artifacts to the exhibit.

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MISSOURI STATE ARCHIVES: THE DRED SCOTT CASE

In its 1857 decision that stunned the nation, the United States Supreme Court upheld slavery in United States territories, denied the legality of black citizenship in America, and declared the Missouri Compromise to be unconstitutional. All of this was the result of an April 1846 action when Dred Scott innocently made his mark with an "X," signing his petition in a pro forma freedom suit, initiated under Missouri law, to sue for freedom in the St. Louis Circuit Court. Desiring freedom, his case instead became the lightning rod for sectional bitterness and hostility that was only resolved by war.

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PRAIRIE CHAPTER NSDAR

The first meeting of the 2015-2016 year for the Prairie Chapter NSDAR will be held Aug. 29 at Places Restaurant in John Knox Village (Lee’s Summit, Mo), beginning at 10 a.m.

For further information or to inquire about membership criteria, contact Lucille Lamb at prairieregistrar@kc.rr.com.

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NUMBERED RECORD BOOKS

Do you have ancestors who fought in the Revolutionary War? Try looking for them in the Numbered Record Books from Fold3’s Revolutionary War Collection.

The 199-volume Numbered Record Books collection, from microfilm at the National Archives, contains miscellaneous records from the Revolutionary War, falling into three main categories: military operations and service, pay and settlement of accounts, and supplies.

The records in these books were originally compiled by the War Department from a wide variety of sources over time and then arbitrarily bound into volumes and numbered. Since the volume numbers don’t indicate any preexisting relationship between the books, Fold3 has arranged them by subject matter rather than consecutive volume numbers, similar to the organization devised by the National Archives.

Because the Numbered Record Books are grouped together by subject, the easiest way to find ancestors mentioned in them is by searching the collection for the person’s name rather than manually browsing. For a much more in depth discussion of the background and content of the Numbered Record Books and how to use them, read the National Archives pamphlet for the collection.

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Monday, July 20, 2015

MGC’S TELL ME A STORY


We all have precious memories of our family history in the form of pictures, documents, and heirlooms, but what about the stories? Stories are what really connect us and paint a complete picture of the lives of our ancestors. The Midwest Genealogy Center’s “Tell Me a Story” oral history program can help you record your loved ones’ stories before they are lost forever. Simply call MGC to make an appointment, and one of our trained staff will record your stories using either our downloadable sample questions or your own interview questions. We have a comfortable study room dedicated to this program, and with your written consent, your stories can be added to our archive so that everyone may benefit. Or, you may choose to check out our kit which has everything you need to record your stories at home. Simply bring the kit back to us and we will burn the audio to disc and send you a copy! This program is free of charge and is a wonderful addition to your genealogy research!

Check out the following link for more information!

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U.S. GRANT SYMPOSIUM II SET FOR MISSOURI HISTORY MUSEUM

Full Day Event Falls on the 130th Anniversary of the General's Death

ST. LOUIS, MO. July 15, 2015. The second annual U. S. Grant Symposium will be held on Thursday, July 23, 2015 at the AT&T Foundation Multipurpose Room at the Missouri History Museum, Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park. The event begins at 9:30 a.m.

The event is presented by the Missouri History Museum in cooperation with the U. S. Grant Trail initiative of Missouri's Civil War Heritage Foundation, with additional funding by the Missouri Humanities Council. The Missouri Civil War Museum at Jefferson Barracks, Bellefontaine Cemetery, the Campbell House Museum and the Ulysses S. Grant National Historic Site in Affton are co-sponsors of the event. Speaker lodging is provided by the Westin St. Louis Hotel.

"This is the only event in the nation this year to honor Ulysses Grant on the day of Grant's death in 1885," according to Greg Wolk, Executive Director of Missouri's Civil War Heritage Foundation, and one of the presenters on July 23. This year's event is a continuation of Missouri's efforts to highlight Grant's deep roots in Missouri, Wolk added.

Speakers also include Tim Good, Superintendent of the Ulysses S. Grant National Historic Site, and Andy Hahn, Executive Director of the Campbell House Museum in downtown St. Louis. The Symposium features a theatrical performance by Pete Grady of Marshalltown, Iowa, The performance, which begins at 1:00 p.m., is called "Unconditional Surrender: An Afternoon with President Grant," and is a production of the Marshalltown Community Theater. Pete Grady has toured Iowa, Illinois and Minnesota with his one-man show. The July 23 event will mark his first performance in Missouri.

A full description of events can be found at mohistory.org/node/56797 or at mocivilwar.org/symposium2015/.

ANCESTRY.COM LAUNCHES ANCESTRYHEALTH

Dr. Cathy Petti Joins as Chief Health Officer to Spearhead Company’s Global Health Initiatives

AncestryDNA Database Surpasses One Million People Genotyped


(PROVO, Utah) - July 16, 2015 – Ancestry, the leader in family history and consumer genetics, today announced the launch of AncestryHealth, a new entity and resource to empower consumers with important health insights to help promote wellness, prevent illness and support healthier living. The company also announced appointment of Cathy A. Petti, MD, as AncestryHealth’s Chief Health Officer. At the same time, AncestryDNA announced the accomplishment of surpassing one million people tested in its database.

AncestryHealth’s first offering is a free service, currently in beta, that gives consumers the ability to compile their family health history information with the help of their Ancestry family tree.
Family health history is unique to every person. According to the Surgeon General’s office, family health history is one of the most effective screening tools in health today. Because certain health conditions like breast cancer, heart disease and cystic fibrosis can run in families and be traced, knowing important information about one’s family’s health history can help individuals and their physicians be more aware of potential health problems and take the necessary steps to reduce and prevent risks.

“Ancestry fundamentally believes family history is a powerful tool that not only can educate individuals about their past and where they came from, but can inform their future,” stated Tim Sullivan, CEO of Ancestry. “This new service leverages expert research and delivers customized information to consumers about the risks and prevention measures to help empower them to make healthy lifestyle choices. Combined with the breadth and scale of Ancestry data, we expect AncestryHealth to be a key piece of the puzzle as we look to understand how health is passed down through generations, and we are excited to have Dr. Petti lead this effort.”

AncestryHealth integrates health information with expertise in genealogy to help consumers trace health conditions along family lines and understand what it means to individuals and their families, while recording this valuable information to share with their physicians and future generations. The company also plans to work with institutions to integrate family health history data into electronic medical records to better help physicians use family health history as a screening tool.

AncestryHealth is committed to being a partner in health by providing individuals with meaningful information and relevant research to help them make choices that could lead to longer, healthier lives. Dr. Petti joins Ancestry’s strong and growing leadership team to help focus AncestryHealth’s global health initiatives on empowering consumers to take charge of their health.

“We’re very excited to not only launch AncestryHealth but to also have Dr. Petti join us as its Chief Health Officer,” said Dr. Ken Chahine, Executive Vice President and General Manager of AncestryDNA and AncestryHealth. “This cements our commitment to bring our customers compelling, innovative and actionable health experiences. Dr. Petti brings tremendous knowledge and experience in individualized and global health, with expertise in clinical, regulatory and healthcare diagnostics. This is invaluable as we set out to create health offerings for our community that integrate with, and leverage the successes of, Ancestry and AncestryDNA.”

In her role, Dr. Petti will work alongside the genomics, bioinformatics, privacy and security teams to lead a health-focused strategy and create a valuable consumer health experience, starting with AncestryHealth’s family health history offering. Dr. Petti will also lead medical and regulatory affairs.

A scientific leader, Dr. Petti is internationally recognized for her expertise in clinical diagnostics and global health. Most recently, she was founder and president of HealthSpring Global, Inc., a concierge IVD consulting company supporting biotechnology companies, investors and academic researchers on the entire life cycle of advanced technologies. Dr. Petti has served as Vice President and Chief Medical Officer at TriCore Reference Laboratories; held the position of Global Head of Medical, Scientific and Clinical Affairs for Novartis Diagnostics; and was Medical Director of ARUP Laboratories. She has held appointments at leading academic institutions as a Professor of Medicine and Pathology, authored numerous peer-reviewed publications, and received multiple scientific awards and honors. Dr. Petti is board certified in both internal medicine and pathology subspecialties, and received an AB from Harvard University and MD from Duke University.

Ancestry is scaling rapidly from being the largest family history database to AncestryDNA now surpassing one million genotyped customers in just three years, making it one of the fastest growing consumer genetic networks today. Now armed with the combination of family history and DNA data, Ancestry is positioned to take a lead in giving consumers a glimpse into future possibilities. The company is also laser focused on bringing together the brightest talent, developing and designing a robust, easy-to-use platform and continuing to evolve in the health ecosystem.

To learn more about the AncestryHealth experience, visit www.ancestryhealth.com.

2015 MoSGA AWARD RECIPIENTS

Each year the MoSGA Awards Committee reaches out to Missouri genealogy and historical societies, libraries, archives and museums with an offer to help reward your hard working volunteers. We also want to hear about those employees that go above and beyond as well. The first of June is the deadline for submission each year and awards are presented at the MoSGA Annual Conference each August.


2015 MoSGA Award Recipients

President’s Award
To Be Announced By MoSGA President, Tim Dollens, at the Annual Conference.

Directors Award--Lula Durham
Nominated by Platte County Historical Society

At age 95, Lula, Lu, is one of the few surviving charter members of the Platte County Historical and Genealogical Society (PCHGS), organized in 1945. Lu has served PCHGS in several capacities, including several three-year terms as a member of the Board of Directors, until retiring in 2009. Additionally Lu served as a docent at the Society’s Ben Ferrel Platte County Museum in Platte City.

It is Lu’s ability to assemble and organize written historical and genealogical materials pertaining to Platte County that has perhaps benefited the Society the most. Lu established the Archives Room in the lower level of the Ben Ferrel Museum, and for many years Lu maintained the archives. This earned Lu the title of Museum Records Archivist. Thanks to Lu’s efforts, research in the Archives is made easy, efficient and productive for visitors who research topics related to Platte County History.

Lu Durham is a native of Platte County, born in Edgerton. After retiring from a career in teaching, she became interested in her Buchanan and Duncan family histories, both lines settling in Platte County in 1943-44. Her mother inherited several trunks of old family letters and Lu became bitten by the genie bug when it fell to her to do something with the family history material.

Award of Merit--William Eddleman
Nominated by The State Historical Society of Missouri

Dr. William “Bill” Eddleman has devoted hundreds of hours transcribing and indexing deed records, land patents and other historical materials from the antebellum period in Cape Girardeau County as well as surrounding counties.

Bill served as President of the Cape Girardeau County Genealogical Society for a total of 14 years during the period of 2002-2014. He has been editor of the Collage of Cape County, the Society’s quarterly publication since 1997. Bill has authored and/or transcribed multiple resources for the Cape Girardeau County Genealogical Society publication.

Additionally, Bill has authored the following publications, outside of Cape Girardeau County: Original Land Patentees of Perry Co., MO, Abstracts of Perry Co., MO Deed Books 1-4 (1821-1844), Abstracts of Haywood Co., NC Deed Books A-C (1807-1838) and Coventry, RI Historical Cemeteries.

Dr. Eddleman is Provost of Southeast Missouri State University and Professor of Biology.

Award of Merit--Garrett Gabel
Nominated by Phelps County Genealogical Society

Garrett Gabel has worked tirelessly to preserve the history of the Southern Phelps/N.W. Dent counties of Missouri. Garrett has worked to gain military records, cemetery caretaker’s and descendant’s approvals in order to comply with Veterans Administration regulations to acquire a set of government issued military monuments for 11 Civil War soldiers.

Garrett has personally financed the purchase and set small headstones for three Civil War soldiers whose military records could not be found as per V.A. requirements. In addition Garrett purchased small headstones for eight additional individuals from Phelps County Missouri. Mr. Gabel has cleaned, repaired and transcribed headstones that were under soil in nine cemeteries in Phelps and Dent counties, that were nearly all forgotten.

Mr. Gabel co-authored “History of Yancy Mills, Mo” and authored “Days of Yore: A History of Southern Phelps Co. Mo., 1861-1921.”

Award of Merit--Cricket Russom
Nominated by Audrain County Area Genealogical Society

Cricket Russom is the Vice-President as well as filling the role of Office Manager for the Audrain County Area Genealogical Society, Cricket directly supports and promotes the mission of the society. Cricket is tasked with making sure the necessary supplies are available and keeps track of all materials for the society.

With Cricket’s help visitors are able to find and access materials necessary for their research goals. She also assists new genealogists in their genealogical research activities providing advice and suggestions.

Certificate of Appreciation--Larry Franke
Nominated by St. Louis County Library

Larry Franke has made many contributions to the genealogical community. Larry teaches classes on beginning genealogy and electronic databases and gives presentations on a variety of subjects to genealogical societies and other groups.

Mr. Franke has been responsible for building the St. Louis County Library’s History & Genealogy collection of sources for French and French Canadian research and manages the library’s collection of genealogical publications. He uses his fluent knowledge of French and Spanish to help researchers navigate historical records in those languages.

Larry has written numerous articles for PastPorts, the department newsletter, to help readers learn about and use materials in the department.


Thank you to all the volunteers that work to expand and improve genealogical research in Missouri. Your efforts are not going unnoticed.

Jenna Mills - Awards Committee Chair
Karen Scott - Awards Committee Member
Mark Stauter - Awards Committee Member

MGC GOES DIGITAL

A grant from Missouri Secretary of State’s office will allow the Mid-Continent Public Library to update its microfilm readers at the Midwest Genealogy Center, allowing patrons to save any microfilm and microfiche information in digital form for personal use.

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TIER 4 WEEKENDS


St. Louis County Library's History & Genealogy department will open its staff-only area to the public the third weekend of each month beginning Saturday and Sunday, July 18 and 19.

The area is located on Tier 4 of Library Headquarters at 1640 S. Lindbergh. The staff-only area houses more than 13,000 family histories, school yearbooks and information about many states west of the Mississippi. Researchers are encouraged to browse and use the materials during the "Explore Tier 4" weekends. History and genealogy staff will also offer tours on third Saturdays at 10:30 a.m.

Usually, items from Tier 4 are available only upon request and are retrieved by a librarian for use in the library. "Explore Tier 4" weekends will allow researchers and genealogists to access this area and browse its holdings independently. Library headquarters is open from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. on Saturday; and from 1 to 5 p.m. on Sunday.

For more information, call the history and genealogy department at 994-3300, ext. 2070.

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