Monday, September 29, 2014

REVOLUTIONARY SOLDIERS BURIED IN ILLINOIS

Available for free viewing/download via HathiTrust:

Walker, Harriett J. Revolutionary Soldiers Buried in Illinois. Los Angeles, Cal.: The Standard Printing Company, 1917.

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RICHARDSON'S SOUTHERN GUIDE

Available for free viewing/download via HathiTrust:

Richardson, F. H. Richardson's Southern Guide: a Complete Handbook to the Beauty Spots, Historical Places, Noted Battlefields, Famous Resorts, Principal Industries And Chief Points of Interest of the South. Chicago: Monarch Book Company, 1905.

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WAR TALKS IN KANSAS

Available for free viewing/download via HathiTrust:

Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States. Kansas Commandery. War Talks In Kansas: a Series of Papers Read Before the Kansas Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States. Kansas City, Mo.: Press of the F. Hudson Publishing Company, 1906.

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THE SPIRIT OF THE SOUTH

Available for free viewing/download via HathiTrust:

Garrison, William Lloyd, 1805-1879. The Spirit of the South toward Northern Freemen and Soldiers Defending the American Flag against Traitors of the Deepest Dye. Boston: R. F. Wallcut, 1861.

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E-HALL EMERGENCY: THE 1954 MISSOURI STATE PRISON RIOT

The biggest riot in Missouri State Penitentiary’s 168-years of operation kicked off shortly after 6 the evening of September 22, 1954, and what would follow was hours of chaos and 50 years of recovery.

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Wednesday, September 24, 2014

WAS GENERAL THOMAS SLOW AT NASHVILLE?

Available for free viewing/download via HathiTrust:

Boynton, Henry V. 1835-1905. Was General Thomas Slow At Nashville? New York: F.P. Harper, 1896.

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Note: Given the magnitude of Thomas’s victory at Nashville (December 1864), I certainly find it difficult to criticize his performance at that battle!

CREATING A SOCIAL MEDIA PLAN FOR YOUR SOCIETY

Thomas MacEntee explains why you need one on the FGS Voice Blog:

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ALASKA GENEALOGY CRUISE

If you’ve got a bit of cash to spare, and love to combine travel with your favorite hobby, this 2015 FGS sponsored cruise may just be your dream vacation:

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EMPORIA’S VIEW OF THE WAR

What citizens of Emporia (KS) thought about the Civil War during its first few weeks:

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Monday, September 22, 2014

ST. CHARLES COUNTY'S PARTICIPATION IN THE WORLD WAR

Available for free viewing/download via HathiTrust:

Honor Roll Association of St. Charles County. St. Charles County's Participation in the World War: a Record of the Men in Military and Naval Service; a History of War Activities At Home and a Brief Chronology of the Great War. St. Charles, Mo.: s.n., 1919.

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A SOLDIER'S STORY

Note: I offer the following biographical sketch as an example of what can be done to make what could have been merely a dry recitation of dates into something that is (hopefully) much more interesting!

SERGEANT BENJAMIN FRANKLIN ELLIS
CO. A, 47th ILLINOIS INFANTRY REGIMENT

Benjamin Franklin Ellis was the son of Levi Ellis and Anna Johnson. He was born in Hampshire County, Virginia (later West Virginia) on December 17, 1846. The family moved to Stark County, Illinois (near Peoria) by 1854.

B. F. Ellis enlisted in the 47th Illinois Infantry Regiment, Company A, at Peoria on August 16, 1861. His brother, George Washington Ellis, also enlisted in the 47th Illinois Infantry, Co. K, on September 17, 1861. George died of disease (measles) while stationed at Jefferson City, Missouri on November 28, 1861, and was buried in the National Cemetery there. Several other brothers also served: Levi T. Ellis was a private in the 33rd Illinois Infantry Regiment, Co. H, and Thomas Jefferson Ellis served as a private in the 2nd Illinois Artillery Regiment, Battery A.

The 47th Illinois was initially sent to St. Louis, where it was equipped and received basic military instruction at Benton Barracks. It performed garrison duty at Jefferson City and later Otterville, Missouri, then was moved to Tennessee in mid-April 1862, shortly after the Battle of Shiloh. The 47th participated in the offensive against Corinth, Mississippi, in May-October 1862. Colonel William Thrush and Captain David De Wolf of the regiment were killed in action during the Battle of Corinth on October 3-4, 1862, while Captain Harmon Andrews was badly wounded and taken prisoner. The regiment lost 30 killed and 100 wounded in this engagement.

The 47th next took part in the Vicksburg campaign and siege. The men stood guard duty, loaded and unloaded steamers, and worked for a time on Grant's ill-fated canal. The regiment lost 12 men killed in a charge on the rebel works on May 22, 1863. After the fall of Vicksburg on July 3, 1863, the men were moved to Tennessee, where they guarded railroads and took part in operations against Nathan Bedford Forrest's cavalry.

The regiment was next part of the Red River campaign in Arkansas, losing 11 men in an engagement with General Marmaduke at Lake Chicot in June 1864. In July 1864, members of the regiment were given the option of receiving their discharge or re-enlisting in the Army. Enough regiment members did so (around one hundred of them) that they were allowed to form the 47th Consolidated Illinois Infantry Regiment. Men re-enlisting received $402 and a 30-day furlough. After a trip back to Stark County, B. F. Ellis took his place as a Corporal in Company A of the 47th Consolidated Illinois Infantry Regiment in August 1864.

Corporal Ellis was captured in September 1864 outside Memphis, Tennessee by Bedford Forrest's cavalry while the regiment was moving to Missouri via Tennessee and Arkansas to help repel Sterling Price's invasion of that state. During his capture, he received an injury to his left eye that resulted in the loss of sight in that eye.

He was sent to Cahaba Prison in Alabama, where he was confined until spring 1865. Cahaba Prison was located at Selma, Alabama, near the confluence of the Cahaba and Alabama Rivers. Prisoners were kept in buildings in which no bedding had been provided, so they slept on the cold stone floors. In mid-February 1865 the Alabama River overflowed its banks, and prisoners stood in waist-high icy water for four days. 3,000-5,000 prisoners were confined at Cahaba during its two years of operation. Each man was allotted about six square feet of space, at a time when not especially generous U.S. Army regulations required at least 42 square feet per man. While confined at Cahaba, B. F. Ellis contracted scurvy, which (along with continuous exposure to the elements) caused him problems for the rest of his life.

B. F. Ellis can be considered one of the luckier members of the 47th Illinois Infantry, however, in spite of his injury, prison experiences, and later health problems. The regiment lost five officers and 58 enlisted men killed and mortally wounded, and three officers and 184 enlisted men by disease (including B. F.'s brother, George), for a total of 250 men who never came home.

After a brief period of hospitalization, B. F. Ellis (who was promoted to Sergeant shortly after his return from Cahaba) was discharged from the Army on May 30, 1865, at Springfield, Illinois. He returned to Stark County, remaining there until 1868, when he moved to DePue, Illinois (Bureau County). He worked as a laborer for the railroad, and later as a janitor at the public school in DePue.

B. F. applied for a disability pension on March 4, 1887, basing his claim on the injury to his eye that occurred during his capture, and on the debilitating effects of the scurvy contracted and exposure suffered at Cahaba Prison. He was awarded a pension of eight dollars per month, which was increased several times before his death.

In spite of his health problems, B. F. lived a long life, dying finally at the age of 92 on December 3, 1939 at Hines Veterans Hospital near Chicago. He is buried just outside DePue, Illinois, at the village cemetery in Selby Township. As a boy I picked blackberries with my parents many times in the area near the cemetery.



Grave of Benjamin Franklin Ellis

I am descended from B. F.'s son, George Franklin Ellis. George died before I was born, but his wife, Louisa Giesey Ellis, my great-grandmother, lived until 1965, and I visited her numerous times at the nursing home she lived in at Princeton, Illinois. I never did ask her any questions about her father-in-law, B. F. Ellis, though, because I was eleven years old when she died, and at that point I knew little and cared less about my family history. I certainly wish now that I'd shown more interest.

Tom Pearson

RECORDS OF THE STATE ARCHIVES OF BERN

St. Louis County Library is excited to announce the recent acquisition of church and other records from Canton Bern, Switzerland. The German and French records, on 847 rolls of high-quality microfilm, feature birth, marriage, and death information from the 16th to 19th centuries. The microfilm can be viewed in the History and Genealogy Department at the St. Louis County Library Headquarters located at 1640 S. Lindbergh Blvd.

The original records, held by the State Archives of Bern, offer information difficult to obtain in the U.S. Researchers are free to view the records and print copies as needed. The History and Genealogy department also offers a knowledgeable staff that can assist researchers in using the microfilm set. Microfilm rolls and their contents are listed in the St. Louis County Library catalog. A finding aid to the collection is available in the History and Genealogy Department.

Purchase of the microfilm set was made possible with funds from the William C.E. and Bessie K. Becker Collection, established in 2014. Mr. Becker, a civil engineer, is remembered for designing the Jewel Box in Forest Park. The couple's surviving children and grandchildren made the donation specifically to enhance the library's genealogical holdings. The Swiss microfilms join other Becker Collection sources for researching German and Irish ancestry.

The St. Louis County Library History and Genealogy Department is home to the National Genealogical Society Book Loan Collection, the St. Louis Genealogical Society Collection, and the Julius K. Hunter and Friends African American Research Collection. The department, with more than 85,000 books, including 16,000 family histories, and 25,000 reels of microfilm, is an important center for genealogical research in the Midwest.

For more information, contact the St. Louis County Library History and Genealogy Department at 314-994-3300, ext. 2070, by email here, or see the library's website.

Scott Holl
Manager, History & Genealogy Department
1640 S. Lindbergh Blvd. | St. Louis, MO 63131
tel 314.994.3300 ext. 2074

BECOME AN FGS AMBASSADOR

September 18, 2014-–Austin, TX. The Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) is pleased to announce an invitation for FGS Ambassadors. If you are a blogger, social media enthusiast, writer, editor, or in any way interested in spreading the word about the FGS 2015 Conference, FGS is looking for you.

The 2015 FGS Conference scheduled for February 11–14 in Salt Lake City, Utah, will be a one-time special event with RootsTech. FGS Ambassadors will blog, share, like, +1, and tweet to spread the news about this unique FGS conference to their friends, colleagues, and everyone interested in genealogy.

Benefits to FGS Ambassadors include:

• Link to your blog, website, Twitter, or other social media accounts on the FGS 2015 Conference Ambassadors Page.
• Potential to be a guest blogger on the FGS Voice Blog.
• Direct contact with the FGS 2015 Marketing Committee.
• Advance notice of press releases and other important updates from the Conference Committee.
• Participation in the FGS Ambassadors Facebook Group.
• Meet up with other Ambassadors at FGS 2015 - group photo for publicity.
• Ambassador badge ribbon at the conference.

Having a genealogy blog or planning to attend the FGS 2015 conference are not requirements for participating.

Visit FGS Ambassadors to review the full guidelines for participating and to register as an FGS Ambassador. Please register by October 8, 2014.

Saturday, September 20, 2014

MISSOURI STATE ARCHIVES PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTIONS

Finding aid to their various photo collections:

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MISSOURI MEMORIES: A HISTORY IN PHOTOGRAPHS

Online exhibit of 63 photos from the large Missouri State Archives photographs collection:

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OFFICIAL RECORDS OF THE UNION AND CONFEDERATE NAVIES

One of Fold3’s newest titles is the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies. Like its name suggests, this collection contains the two navies’ official reports, orders, and correspondence from the Civil War. If you’re interested in the Civil War, this is the go-to title for contemporary, first-hand information about the Northern and Southern navies. Originally compiled by the Navy Department, the Official Records of the Navies are organized into two series: Series I, with 27 individual volumes, and Series II, with 3 volumes and an index. Series I documents all wartime operations of the two navies, while Series II deals with statistical data of Union and Confederate ships, letters of marque and reprisal, Confederate departmental investigations, Navy and State department correspondence, proclamations and appointments of President Davis, and more.

It took about 40 years for the Navy Department to finish compiling the records, with work officially beginning in 1884 and the final volume of Series II being published in 1922 (and the index in 1927). Because of the massive number of pages contained in the Official Records, Fold3 is still working on getting all of it up on our site. At last check, the project was three-fourths complete (but at least you won’t have to wait 40 years!).

A few interesting finds in the Official Records of the Navies include the following:

• A Union account of the Battle of Gloucester Point, the earliest engagement between the Union Navy and the Confederates
• A Confederate report on the Battle of Hampton Roads, the first battle of ironclad ships
• A letter from a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy detailing the death of a fellow lieutenant during the Second Battle of Fort Fisher, the battle in which the Confederacy lost its last seaport

Beyond historical information, the Official Records of the Navies can be a good place to look for any of your ancestors who served in either navy during the war. Take a look through the extensive 457-page index, and you’ll get an idea of just how many thousands of names are mentioned in the records. Even if you don’t find your specific ancestors, you’re almost guaranteed to find information about their commanding officers or the ships they served on, helping you to round out your general knowledge of what those ancestors’ lives were like. Get started browsing through the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies here, or do a search instead.

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Note: Fold3.com has certainly done a nice job digitizing this set, but you can also access it here for free:

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NARA-KC IS GOING UNDER, PART II

More about their underground storage space:

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HAPPY 40th, DCGS!

Davis County (IA) Genealogical Society is celebrating by hosting a 40th year free open house Oct. 4, 2014.

The event is to celebrate the local society’s 40 years of providing promotion of the study of genealogy, preservation of records and assistance to researchers.

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Wednesday, September 17, 2014

USING NARA CIVILIAN RECORDS

United States. National Archives and Records Administration. Using Civilian Records for Genealogical Research in the National Archives Washington, DC, Area. Rev. 2009. Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Administration, 2009.

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HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT OF VETERANS' BENEFITS IN THE U.S.

United States. President's Commission on Veterans' Pensions. The Historical Development of Veterans' Benefits in the United States: a Report on Veterans Benefits in the United States. Washington: U. S. Govt. Print. Off., 1956.

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THIRTEENTH REGIMENT OF ILLINOIS VOLUNTEER INFANTRY

Military History And Reminiscences of the Thirteenth Regiment of Illinois Volunteer Infantry in the Civil War in the United States, 1861-1865. Chicago: Woman's Temperance Publishing Association, 1892.

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THE STORY OF THE FORTY-EIGHTH

Gould, Joseph. The Story of the Forty-eighth: a Record of the Campaigns of the Forty-eighth Regiment Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteer Infantry during the Four Eventful Years of Its Service in the War for the Preservation of the Union. Philadelphia: Arranged by F. H. Taylor; printed by Alfred M. Slocum Co., 1908.

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NARA-KC IS GOING UNDER, PART I

Underground, that is—NARA-KC has agreed to increase its operating space at Hunt Midwest SubTropolis by 112,000 square feet:

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Sunday, September 14, 2014

MORMON PIONEER NATIONAL HISTORIC TRAIL

Kimball, Stanley Buchholz. Mormon Pioneer National Historic Trail. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Dept. of the Interior, National Park Service, 1991.

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THE FORTY-THIRD REGIMENT, ACTIVE MILITIA OF CANADA

Chambers, Ernest J. A Regimental History of the Forty-third Regiment, Active Militia of Canada. Ottawa: E.L. Ruddy, 1903.

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THE RECORD OF A REGIMENT OF THE LINE

Jacson, Mainwaring George. The Record of a Regiment of the Line: Being a Regimental History of the 1st Battalion Devonshire Regiment during the Boer War, 1899-1902. London, England: Hutchinson and Co., 1908.

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THE AMERICAN WAR OF SECESSION, 1863

Dalbiac, Philip Hugh. The American War of Secession, 1863: Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. London: S. Sonnenschien & Co. Ltd., 1911.

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Wednesday, September 10, 2014

GOVERNORS OF THE STATES, 1900-1958

Library of Congress. Legislative Reference Service. The Governors of the States, 1900-1958: a Compilation Showing for Each State the Name, Term, Party, And Place of Residence Arranged for Convenient Reference. Chicago: Council of State Governments, 1957.

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THE ROYAL GRENADIERS

Chambers, Ernest J. The Royal Grenadiers: a Regimental History of the 10th Infantry Regiment of the Active Militia of Canada. Toronto: E.L. Ruddy, 1904.

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THE CANADIAN MILITIA

Chambers, Ernest J. The Canadian Militia: a History of the Origin and Development of the Force. Montreal: L.M. Fresco, 1907.

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COLLECTIONS OF THE ILLINOIS STATE HISTORICAL LIBRARY

Illinois State Historical Library. Collections of the Illinois State Historical Library. Springfield: Illinois State Historical Library, 1903 (various vols.).

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BULLETIN OF THE ILLINOIS STATE HISTORICAL LIBRARY

Illinois State Historical Library. Bulletin of the Illinois State Historical Library. Springfield, 1905-06 (vols. 1-2).

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Monday, September 08, 2014

THE 18TH HUSSARS IN SOUTH AFRICA

Burnett, Charles. The 18th Hussars in South Africa: the Records of a Cavalry Regiment during the Boer War, 1899-1902. Winchester, Eng.: Warren & Son, 1905.

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HISTORY OF THE SHERWOOD FORESTERS

Dalbiac, Philip Hugh. History of the 45th: 1st Nottinghamshire Regiment (Sherwood Foresters). London: S. Sonnenschein & Co., Ltd., 1902.

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LEAVES FROM A SOLDIER'S DIARY

Smith, George Gilbert. Leaves from a Soldier's Diary; the Personal Record of Lieutenant George G. Smith, Co. C., 1st Louisiana Regiment Infantry Volunteers during the War of the Rebellion. Putnam, Conn.: G. G. Smith, 1906.

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WAKEFIELD'S HISTORY OF THE BLACK HAWK WAR

Wakefield, John Allen. Wakefield's History of the Black Hawk War: a Reprint of the 1st Edition. Chicago: Caxton Club, 1908.

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STATE VETERANS' LAWS (1960)

Library of Congress. Legislative Reference Service. State Veterans' Laws: Digests of State Laws Regarding Rights, Benefits, And Privileges of Veterans And Their Dependents. Washington: U. S. Govt. Print. Off., 1960.

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Saturday, September 06, 2014

THE COMMISSION OF FISH AND FISHERIES AT THE FAIR (1904)

United States. Bureau of Fisheries. The U. S. Commission of Fish And Fisheries And Its Exhibit At the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo., 1904. Washington, D.C.: Press of Gibson Bros., 1904.

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IOWA AT THE FAIR (1904)

Iowa. Commission to the Louisiana Purchase Exposition. Report of the Iowa Commission to the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, 1904. Des Moines: Register and Leader Co., 1906.

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WISCONSIN AT THE FAIR (1904)

Wisconsin. Board of Managers of the St. Louis World's Fair. Wisconsin At the Louisiana Purchase Exposition: Report of the State Board of Managers of the Saint Louis World's Fair, 1904. Madison, Wisconsin: The Board, 1904.

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SONS OF SCIENCE

Oehser, Paul H. Sons of Science: the Story of the Smithsonian Institution And Its Leaders. New York: H. Schuman, 1949.

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Wednesday, September 03, 2014

RESEARCH IN THE LAND ENTRY FILES OF THE GLO

Hawkins, Kenneth. Research in the Land Entry Files of the General Land Office: Record Group 49. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 2007.

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TUBERCULOSIS IN THE U.S. ARMY IN WORLD WAR II

Long, Esmond R. Tuberculosis in the Army of the United States in World War II: an Epidemiological Study with an Evaluation of X-ray Screening. Washington: U.S. Govt. Print. Off., 1955.

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THE FALL OF ATLANTA

From the Fold3.com Blog:

In May 1864, Union general William T. Sherman began his invasion of Georgia, going up against Confederate general Joseph Johnston in a series of battles and skirmishes throughout early and mid-summer. But in July, President Jefferson Davis, unhappy with Johnston’s tactics, replaced him with the more aggressive John Bell Hood.

Sherman’s and Hood’s men clashed time and again in July and August. Sherman, unwilling to attempt a head-on assault of Atlanta, decided instead to cut off the city’s last remaining railroad supply line, which his men successfully did despite Confederate opposition.

When Hood was informed of the rail line’s destruction, he ordered the evacuation of his men from Atlanta on September 1. Before they left, they destroyed ammunition stores, locomotives, and anything else the Federals would find useful. The Federals took the city the next day. Sherman’s troops would remain in Atlanta for another two months, before leaving in mid-November on Sherman’s destructive March to the Sea.

Civil War posts on the Fold3.com Blog

JAPAN SURRENDERS

On September 2, 1945, Japan signed the Instrument of Surrender, officially ending World War II.

Despite the fact that Japan’s defeat seemed imminent all that summer, it wasn’t until after atomic bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki—at nearly the same time that the Soviets declared war on Japan and attacked Manchuria—that Japan saw surrender as a possibility. Even then, there was still wide support in Japanese political and military circles for the war to continue, and it took the emperor himself speaking in favor of surrender for Japan to finally capitulate on August 14.

The surrender ceremony took place a few weeks later, on the morning of September 2, in Tokyo Bay on board the USS Missouri. Allied officials and members of the press arrived on the ship between 7 and 8 that morning, with General Douglas MacArthur, the newly appointed Supreme Commander of Allied Powers, arriving at 8:43 and the Japanese delegation boarding at 8:56. The ceremony began at 9:02, and MacArthur gave a brief speech in which he remarked, “It is my earnest hope, and indeed the hope of all mankind, that from this solemn occasion a better world shall emerge out of the blood and carnage of the past.”

After MacArthur finished, the Japanese delegates signed the unconditional surrender. They were followed by MacArthur, who signed on behalf of the Allies, and Admiral Chester Nimitz, who signed for the United States. China, Britain, the USSR, Australia, Canada, France, the Netherlands, and New Zealand also signed the documents. By 9:22, everyone had signed, and MacArthur concluded the ceremony with another short speech. After he had spoken, 450 U.S. navy planes and hundreds more army planes flew in formation over the Missouri. The ceremony ended at 9:25, a brief 23 minutes long.

Although the war was over, it was still some months before the Allies had accepted the surrender of all the widespread Japanese garrisons. And some Japanese units in remote areas continued to fight after the surrender until they heard the news (which for a few men was years or even decades later). MacArthur headed the American occupation of Japan until 1951, and U.S. troops remained in the country until the following year, 1952.

Learn more about Japan’s surrender or other WWII topics in Fold3′s WWII collection.

Monday, September 01, 2014

BLACK FAMILY RESEARCH AT NARA

Washington, Reginald. Black Family Research: Records of Post-Civil War Federal Agencies at the National Archives. Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Administration, 2010.

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RECORDS AT NARA-KC

United States. National Archives and Records Administration. Central Plains Region. National Archives At Kansas City: Federal Records of the Central Plains Region From Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota. Kansas City, MO: National Archives at Kansas City, Central Plains Region, 2010.

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EVERYTHING OLD IS NEW AGAIN

Booz, Allen & Hamilton. Management Survey of Activities of the Veterans Administration by the Firm of Booz-Allen-Hamilton. Washington: U. S. Govt. Print. Off., 1952.

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DISHONOR THY (GR-GR-GR) GRANDFATHER

Two New York City teenagers have been arrested after they were allegedly caught defacing a Civil War monument on the Upper West Side early Thursday, police say.

Two NYPD officers were patrolling near the Soldiers' and Sailors' Memorial Monument on Riverside Drive and West 89th Street before 3:30 a.m. when they got a report of graffiti vandals there, according to police.

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500 MILLION AND COUNTING…

Jefferson City, Mo. — Secretary of State Jason Kander today announced there have been more than 500 million visits to the Missouri Digital Heritage website since its inception in 2007. Missouri Digital Heritage is an online resource of digitized state and local records managed by the Missouri State Archives, a division of Kander’s office. The site can be accessed here.

"The success of Missouri Digital Heritage is a reflection of Missourians’ strong commitment to the preservation of Missouri history and genealogy resources," Kander said. "I’m proud of the work staff and volunteers have done over countless hours to provide greater access to our state’s rich history."

Popular collections and topics hosted on Missouri Digital Heritage include military service records from the War of 1812 through World War II, court records and photograph collections from around the state, as well as hundreds of other collections.

Missouri Digital Heritage is a collaborative effort among the Missouri State Archives, Missouri State Library and the State Historical Society of Missouri. Thanks to the efforts of this partnership, Missourians now have online access to over 9 million records documenting Missouri’s history as institutions across the state have been able to digitize their records.

Missourians can support Missouri Digital Heritage by becoming a volunteer. There are numerous projects for volunteers to join, such as the marriage indexing program, which makes the state’s marriage records available to researchers around the world. Anyone interested in volunteering can contact the Missouri State Archives volunteer coordinator here or at (573) 751-3280.

EXPLORING FOLD3.COM

The National Archives at Kansas City will offer one free genealogy workshop in September. The workshop will be held at 400 West Pershing Road, Kansas City, Missouri.

Workshop Description

Exploring Fold3.com on Saturday, September 6 from 10:00 -11:30 a.m.

Fold3.com is a subscription-based website that provides digital access to select military records held in the National Archives. Learn what resources are available for various military engagements and how to search them.

To make a reservation for this free workshop, please call 816-268-8000 or email us here. Requests for ADA accommodations must be submitted five business days prior to events.

The National Archives at Kansas City is home to historical records dating from the 1820s to the 1990s created or received by Federal agencies in Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota. For more information, call 816-268-8000 or visit us here.