Tuesday, December 31, 2013

FIFTY-FIFTH REGIMENT ILLINOIS VOLUNTEER INFANTRY

Brown, John G, Henry S. Nourse, and Lucian B. Crooker. The Story of the Fifty-Fifth Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry In the Civil War, 1861-1865. Clinton, Ma.: W.J. Coulter, 1887.

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SEVEN GIFTS YOU WOULD HAVE WANTED…

…had you known that you needed them:

LINK

OUTPOST FREE SECURITY SUITE

They offer an outstanding free security suite (anti-virus, spam protection, and a free firewall), or you can opt for their excellent paid version:

LINK

GENERAL HISTORY OF MACON COUNTY, MISSOURI

White, Edgar, and Henry Taylor. General History of Macon County, Missouri. Chicago: H. Taylor & Company, 1910.

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HISTORY OF MISSOURI SCHOOL OF MINES AND METALLURGY

Phelps County Historical Society, Rolla, Mo. The History of Missouri School of Mines And Metallurgy. 1st printed ed. S.n.: Rolla, Mo, 1941.

LINK

SONGS SUNG BY THE "SINGING SCHOOL" OF THE MISSOURI COMMANDERY

Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States. Commandery of the State of Missouri. Songs Sung by the "Singing School" of the Missouri Commandery. St. Louis: W. R. Hodges, 1905.

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Sunday, December 29, 2013

MISSOURI COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

Looking for historical info on a particular Missouri college or university? This site is a great starting point:

LINK

INTO THE BREACH, DEAR FRIENDS...

If a website should ever refuse to allow you to close your account with them (or just make it difficult to do so), you can still make sure that any info they collected when you registered can’t hurt you if hackers should ever breach that website. Instead of closing the account, just update your account with incorrect info. For instance, if the account asked for birth date and birthplace, or mother’s maiden name, or other potentially sensitive info, just change those items so that a hacker breach won’t net them any useful info. If it's a site you're paying for automatically with a credit card, nose around and see if you can change payment terms from "automatic" to "manual."

This site offers tips for closing accounts with 20+ online services:

LINK

DIVIDED LOYALTIES

New book lists 812 Civil War soldiers buried in Clay County, Missouri, with biographical info for each plus photos of the vet (or a photo of the grave marker) for 600 of those men:

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THE MODERN VIEW

From Missouri History Museum's most recent monthly newsletter:

If you're researching St. Louis Jewish ancestors in the first half of the 20th century, you may want to consult a periodical titled The Modern View, which published news and views of the St. Louis Jewish community. The Missouri History Museum Library holds an incomplete run of issues of The Modern View. The Central Branch of the St. Louis Public Library also holds a run of The Modern View.

Of particular interest to genealogists is the 25th anniversary deluxe edition of The Modern View, which includes biographical sketches and portraits of prominent members of the St. Louis Jewish community. View the St. Louis Public Library's index to this 25th anniversary edition.

MISSOURI HISTORY MUSEUM UPDATE

The following sources have recently been added to the Genealogy and Local History Index.

1. Annual Benefit, St. Louis Police Relief Association, 1914

2. Official Program, Thirty-Seventh Annual Session, Supreme Council, Mystic Order Veiled Prophets of the Enchanted Realm, St. Louis, Missouri, June 15-17, 1926

3. Central States Life Bulletin, Volume III, Number 8 (March 1914)

4. The Saturday Night Saver, Volume 4, Number 5 (May 1929) (published by the Lafayette-South Side Bank and Trust Company)

5. Program for the Thirty-Eighth Annual Commencement Exercises, Benton College of Law, St. Louis, Missouri, June 8, 1937

6. Program for charity concert given by the St. Louis Massenchor, March 11, 1925

7. Program for charity concert given by the St. Louis Massenchor, February 6, 1924

8. Program for charity concert given by the St. Louis Massenchor, April 19, 1923

9. The Printing Trades Magazine, 1909-1915 (incomplete run)

10. Emmanuel Orbit (newsletter published by Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Webster Groves, Mo.), 1944-1946 (incomplete run)

11. Program for the Third Annual Boy Scout Circus, St. Louis, Mo., February 13-14, 1925

12. Program for the annual picnic given by the Benton School Parents' Club, June 7, 1939

13. “Report of the Industrial Bureau of the Industrial Club of St. Louis,” 1928-1935

UNITED KINGDOM WWII CIVILIAN DEATHS, 1939-1945

This recently added Ancestry.com database contains seven volumes listing civilians in the British Commonwealth and Empire who died during World War II and are commemorated on Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) memorials or buried in CWGC cemeteries. The Commission explains these records as follows:

“These volumes contain the Roll of Honour of those civilians, citizens of the Commonwealth and Empire, who were killed in the United Kingdom by enemy action during the 1939–1945 War, while engaged in household or in business activities, or at their posts as members of the Civil Defence Services. Their graves are scattered throughout the country.”

While many of these records involve deaths in the United Kingdom, they also include deaths of British civilians worldwide, including some lost at sea.

LINK

Friday, December 27, 2013

ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT & CATALOGUE OF THE LAW AND MEDICAL SCHOOLS

University of Missouri. Annual Announcement And Catalogue of the Law And Medical Schools of the University of the State of Missouri: Session of 1889-1890. Columbia, MO: The University, 1890.

Full view is actually available for various years 1889-1922.

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USES OF PLANTS BY THE INDIANS OF THE MISSOURI RIVER REGION

Gilmore, Melvin R. Uses of Plants by the Indians of the Missouri River Region. Washington: Govt. print. off., 1919.

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THE MEDICAL AND SURGICAL DIRECTORY OF THE STATE OF IOWA

The Medical and Surgical Directory of the State of Iowa. S.n.: Lyons, Ia., 1876.

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CHICAGO MEDICAL REGISTER AND DIRECTORY

Chicago Medical Register And Directory. Chicago: W. B. Keen, Cooke & Co., 1874.

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THE THIRTY-THIRD REGIMENT ILLINOIS INFANTRY

Burnham, John Howard. The Thirty-third Regiment Illinois Infantry in the Civil War, 1861-1865. Springfield: s.n., 1912.

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THE SEVENTH ILLINOIS INFANTRY IN THE CIVIL WAR

Ambrose, D. Leib. From Shiloh to Savannah: the Seventh Illinois Infantry in the Civil War. DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 2003.

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A HISTORY OF MEDICINE IN MISSOURI

Goodwin, E. J. A History of Medicine In Missouri. St. Louis: W. L. Smith, 1905.

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BITTER BIERCE

The Civil War didn’t kill future famous writer Ambrose “Bitter” Bierce—-but it came close on several occasions:

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This link gives you access to his 12-volume Collected Works:

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GPO EBOOKS

The Government Printing Office has ebooks for sale (although quite a few are in fact free)—and there are no troublesome DRM protections, so they’re easy to transfer from one of your gadgets to another:

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OTR

I’ve said it before: many old-time radio shows are terrific fun to listen to, and there are (free) shows of interest whether you want to laugh, cry, shiver, or just be entertained:

LINK

Tuesday, December 24, 2013

HISTORY OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS OF CHICAGO

The Biographical Publishing Corporation, and Chicago Medical Society. History of Medicine And Surgery And Physicians And Surgeons of Chicago. Chicago, Ill.: The Biographical Publishing Corporation, 1922.

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JOHN BELL HOOD’S LEG

Many Civil War soldiers suffered wounds that disfigured or maimed them for life—and it wasn’t always the lowest-ranking men who suffered such wounds:

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PRINT A CALENDAR

Need a simple and easy to use monthly calendar? Just click on a day and type in your reminder or event. Great for those holiday vacation reminders, chore lists, or job to-do nag lists—and it's easy to download and customize:

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ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY IN MISSOURI

Goldstein, Max A. One Hundred Years of Medicine And Surgery In Missouri: Historical And Biographical Review of the Careers of the Physicians And Surgeons of the State of Missouri, And Sketches of Some of Its Notable Medical Institutions. St. Louis: St. Louis Star, 1900.

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HISTORY OF THE FIRST REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY

Kern, Albert. History of the First Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry In the Civil War, 1861-1865. Dayton, Ohio: A. Kern, 1918.

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CENTURIES OF SERVICE

The National Archives at Kansas City will be offering an exciting four-part genealogy workshop series every Wednesday, starting on January 8 through January 29 – Centuries of Service: Exploring Military Records for Genealogy. Attend all four classes to receive a certificate of completion. The workshops will be held from 10:00 – 11:30 a.m. at the National Archives at Kansas City, 400 West Pershing Road, Kansas City, Missouri.

Centuries of Service: Exploring Military Records for Genealogy

Workshop Descriptions:

Fighting the Red Coats: Records from the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812
Wednesday, January 8 from 10:00 – 11:30 a.m.

The young republic spent eleven years battling the British in two wars between the years 1775-1815. During these conflicts and the tense period between the formal wars, young soldiers stepped up and answered the call to protect the new nation. Discover the variety of records documenting your ancestor’s military experience, and ways to access them.

Growing Pains: Exploring Resources for Mid-19th Century American Conflicts
Wednesday, January 15 from 10:00 – 11:30 a.m.

Following the War of 1812, the United States endured a period of rapid expansion and upheaval. Conflicts exploded first with Native American tribes in the southeast, then with Mexico, and finally as the nation split in two during the Civil War. This class examines military records created during the mid-19th Century, from service records and pension files, to more detailed records on units in combat, as well as instructions on how to access these records.

Turn of the Century Conflicts: Spanish-American War, Philippine Insurrection, and WWI
Wednesday, January 22 from 10:00 – 11:30 a.m.

At the end of the 19th and into the 20th century, the battlefields moved from the continental United States to international soil. Beginning with the Spanish American War, leading to the Philippine Insurrection, and culminating in World War I, our ancestors left the United States to serve American causes abroad. Learn about the records that tell these stories.

A World Torn Apart: World War II, Korean War, and Vietnam War
Wednesday, January 29 from 10:00 – 11:30 a.m.

Though these wars were international in scope, the United States military created records during World War II, Korean War, and Vietnam War that provide insight into the units and individuals who served. This class explores how to order service records, identify online resources, and understand privacy restrictions.

To make a reservation for these free events, please call 816-268-8000 or email kansascity.archives@nara.gov.

The National Archives at Kansas City is one of 15 facilities nationwide where the public can access Federal archival records. It is home to historical records dating from the 1820s to the 1990s created or received by Federal agencies in Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota. For more information, call 816-268-8000 or visit www.archives.gov/kansas-city.

Monday, December 23, 2013

THIRD REGIMENT OF WISCONSIN VETERAN VOLUNTEER INFANTRY

Bryant, Edwin E. History of the Third Regiment of Wisconsin Veteran Volunteer Infantry, 1861-1865. Salem, Mass.: Higginson Book Co., 1999.

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FIRST REGIMENT MICHIGAN ENGINEERS AND MECHANICS

Sligh, Charles R. History of the Services of the First Regiment Michigan Engineers And Mechanics During the Civil War, 1861-1865.Grand Rapids: s.n., 1921.

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PAINT.NET

Need a fairly powerful photo editor, but don’t have the spare change to get Photoshop? This free editor may have all the editing power you need:

LINK

EVERYONE PIANO

Want to entertain everyone at that next family reunion You can use Everyone Piano to learn how to play the piano using your computer keyboard:

LINK

Friday, December 20, 2013

SURVIVORS OF THE 86TH ILLINOIS VOLUNTEER INFANTRY

United States. Army. Illinois Infantry Regiment, 86th (1862-1865). Roster of the Survivors of the 86th Illinois Volunteer Infantry With the Post Office Addresses As Far As Known, Together With the Proceedings of the Reunion Held At Peoria, Ill., August 27, 1887. Peoria, Ill.: J.W. Franks & Sons, 1887.

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DIARY OF A TAR HEEL CONFEDERATE SOLDIER

Leon, L. Diary of a Tar Heel Confederate Soldier. Charlotte, N.C.: Stone Pub. Co., 1913.

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YOUR PAL, MICROSOFT

You can get hundreds of free templates for Microsoft Office from your BFFs in Redmond, WA:

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GET IT RIGHT THE FIRST TIME

Buying a tablet for yourself or a loved one? Because there are so many good ones available, it’s getting harder to choose. This comparison chart from Kim Komando should make decision-making easier for you:

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INVENTORY OF THE COUNTY ARCHIVES OF SOUTH CAROLINA

Carolina Historical Records Survey. Inventory of the County Archives of South Carolina. Columbia, S.C.: Historical Records Survey, 1937.

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Wednesday, December 18, 2013

FLIPBOARD

From their website:

Millions of people use Flipboard to read and collect the news they care about, curating their favorite stories into their own magazines on any topic imaginable. Now magazines created by our readers, from The Best Gifts for Men to Inventions, can be shared and enjoyed on the Web by anyone, anywhere.

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NINITE

If you just bought a PC, or need to reinstall favorite apps on an infected PC you had to nuke, Ninite can quickly and conveniently do most of heavy lifting for you:

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TO EXTEND OR NOT TO EXTEND

Do you need an extended warranty on that electronic gadget you’re buying this holiday season? As general rule, no—but it's occasionally a good idea:

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THE OREGON TRAIL: THE MISSOURI RIVER TO THE PACIFIC OCEAN

United States. Federal Writers' Project. The Oregon Trail: the Missouri River to the Pacific Ocean. New York: Hastings House, 1939.

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THE CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS

American Council on Education. The Civilian Conservation Corps. Washington, D.C.: The American Youth Commission, 1940.

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Monday, December 16, 2013

THE CCC: WHAT IT IS AND WHAT IT DOES

Civilian Conservation Corps (U.S.). The Civilian Conservation Corps: What it Is And What it Does. Washington, D.C.: Civilian Conservation Corps, Office of the Director, 1939.

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PRELIMINARY INVENTORY OF THE RECORDS OF THE CCC

National Archives (U.S.). Preliminary Inventory of the Records of the Civilian Conservation Corps. Washington: National Archives, 1948.

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INVENTORY OF THE CHURCH ARCHIVES OF NEW YORK STATE

Historical Records Survey (N.Y.). Inventory of the Church Archives of New York State Exclusive of New York City. Albany, N. Y.: The Historical Records Survey, 1939.

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INVENTORY OF THE COUNTY ARCHIVES OF NEW YORK STATE

Historical Records Survey (U.S.). New York (State). Inventory of the County Archives of New York State (exclusive of the Five Counties of New York City). Albany: Historical Records Survey, 1937.

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Saturday, December 14, 2013

LET IT SNOW, LET IT SNOW...

So, how's your weather? St. Louis is getting snow right now--enough that I'll be going to work late today (but still have to report in anyway, drat the luck...).







HTTPS EVERYWHERE

If you use a fair number of sites that require you to provide sensitive info like birth dates, account numbers, and passwords, this extension for Firefox and Chrome can ensure that your business with sensitive sites is encrypted:

LINK

TRAVEL SECRETS

Going to see the kids/grandkids? These travel tips from Kim Komando could make your holiday travels a lot less painful:

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BARGAINS UNDER $20

Your U.S. Government Bookstore has a page of Xmas gift ideas that will set you back less than 20 bucks:

LINK

CHECK LIST OF CHICAGO ANTE-FIRE IMPRINTS, 1851-1871

Check List of Chicago Ante-Fire Imprints, 1851-1871. Chicago: The Historical Records Survey, Works Progress Administration, 1938.

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INVENTORY OF THE COUNTY ARCHIVES OF ILLINOIS

Inventory of the County Archives of Illinois. Chicago: Works Progress Administration, Historical Records Survey, 1937.

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THE 1864 CENSUS OF THE TERRITORY OF ARIZONA

The 1864 Census of the Territory of Arizona. Phoenix, Ariz.: The Historical Records Survey, Division of Women's And Professional Projects, 1938.

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THE STORMING OF FORT NIAGARA (19 DECEMBER 1813)

Fort Niagara, located on the eastern bank of the Niagara River at Lake Ontario, was an early French fortress captured by the British in July 1759. It became a Loyalist base during the American Revolution, but was ceded to the United States at the end of the war, although not completely controlled by American troops until 1796.

At about the midpoint of the War of 1812, the fort once again became a British stronghold. After only seventeen years under American control, Fort Niagara was re-captured by the British two hundred years ago this month, on December 19, 1813. As a strategically important U.S. garrison on the Canadian border, anyone commanding the fort controlled river and portage access between two Great Lakes—Ontario and Erie. It was a critical portal to Ohio, Michigan, and the American Midwest.

During the War of 1812, the British were garrisoned across the river at Canada's Fort George. Tensions were obviously high between the two forts, occupied by opposing armies, and they frequently exchanged artillery fire. The Americans succeeded in capturing Fort George in May 1813 yet abandoned it in early December, burning the fortress and the surrounding town. Although in ruins, Fort George was quickly reoccupied by British forces, giving them a prime position to attack the American garrison across the river. Late on the night of December 18, five hundred British troops crossed the river south of Fort Niagara, marched north, raiding and burning villages en route, surprising the American defenders, and easily taking the fortress before dawn on the 19th. They held it for the duration of the war.

The Treaty of Ghent, signed to end the War of 1812, declared that captured territory be returned "status quo ante bellum," meaning that anything captured by the British during the war was returned to the United States, including Fort Niagara. Although it has not been an active military post since 1940, the site is still in use today. The "French Castle," built by France in 1726 still stands and "Old Fort Niagara" is now an historic site. Its importance in several wars over three centuries is revealed through reenactments, exhibits, tours, and events.

Explore the War of 1812 Collection on Fold3.

Monday, December 09, 2013

HENRY McNEAL TURNER

Article about the first black chaplain in the Union Army:

LINK

CLOSED ST. LOUIS PARISHES

List of closed St. Louis parishes, with explanation of current (but soon to be changing) Archdiocese research policy:

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ST. LOUIS ARCHDIOCESE RESEARCH POLICY CHANGE

As of December 31, 2013, the Archdiocesan Archives will no longer provide genealogical research services. For those wishing to conduct genealogical research, microfilm of the Archdiocese of St. Louis Sacramental Registers is available for use at the St. Louis County Library Special Collections. The County Library will do look-ups of sacramental information for offsite patrons. Please contact them for more information. The Library welcomes genealogists to use their wide range of genealogical and local history books, materials, databases and online subscriptions:

http://www.slcl.org/genealogy

The St. Louis Genealogical Society will also conduct family research. The Society is an expert regarding resources available in the area, and also houses a small research library, computers with genealogical software, and microform for St. Louis area research. Please contact them for more information:

http://www.stlgs.org/

STLGS ANNUAL FAMILY HISTORY CONFERENCE

44th Annual Family History Conference

Genealogy in the Computer Age
Featuring David Rencher, AG, CG, FIGRS, FUGA

Saturday, 26 April 2014
Maryland Heights Community Centre
2344 McKelvey Road, St. Louis, MO

Registration booklet coming in February 2014.

Saturday, December 07, 2013

THE GOODLIEST SOYLE

The newest webinar in our series of land records in North Carolina by Helen F. M. Leary will be presented on 17 January 2014 and continue free for all to view through 19 January on the North Carolina Genealogical Society website, webinar tab: ncgenealogy.org.

In “The Goodliest Soyle”: Finding, Reading, & Interpreting North Carolina Land, Ms. Leary discusses the ways a person acquires land. In colonial times, English Common Law governed property rights. Knowing the law, the records it created, and the location of those records, is necessary for successful searches.

Once found, the genealogist must read and interpret the record. Correct analysis is important to glean the maximum information from each document. Ms. Leary provides the listener with tools and tips to reach a successful outcome.

Thank you,

Maryann Stockert Tuck
NCGS Webinars

MASTERING GENEALOGICAL PROOF

NGS announces the release of the Kindle version of Mastering Genealogical Proof by Thomas W. Jones, PhD, CG, CGL, FASG, FNGS. The book was released in print version earlier this year. As a textbook on genealogical methods and reasoning, Mastering Genealogical Proof has proven popular with readers at all levels, from beginners to experts. The book has received a tremendous critical and popular reception and is in its third printing. Many readers have asked for mobile versions. NGS is pleased to be able to make this publication available now in the Kindle format and soon in Apple’s iBooks format.

Dr. Jones is a noted writer, lecturer, and editor in the field of genealogy. He draws on his expertise to make Mastering Genealogical Proof a definitive guide for marshaling evidence to reach sound conclusions regarding the identity and relationships of ancestors. Each chapter of the book contains examples of real issues and asks the reader to apply the book’s concepts to problems presented at the end of each chapter.

The Kindle version of Mastering Genealogical Proof is now available at Amazon.com for $9.99. Print versions of the book can still be ordered at the NGS online store.

Wednesday, December 04, 2013

AUDACITY

Getting ready to start recording/editing oral histories or other sound recordings? Audacity is a free, open source, cross-platform application for recording and editing sounds. Audacity is available for Windows, Mac, GNU/Linux and several other operating systems:

LINK

JAVA

What is Java? Java allows you to play online games, chat with people around the world, calculate your mortgage interest, and view images in 3D, just to name a few applications. It's also integral to intranet applications and other e-business solutions that are the foundation of corporate computing. You can learn more about it, and check to see if your computer’s version of Java is up to date here:

LINK

GENEALOGICAL BULLETIN

Genealogical Bulletin. Boston, Mass.: The Research Publication Company, vol. 1 (1903).

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ABINE

This site provides step by step instructions on how to remove your online public records from several dozen leading data sites. Be aware, however, that it can take hours to remove this info. Don't have the time? Check out DeleteMe, their pay service that does all the tough work of removing your private information from the web.

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HUNDRED ZEROS

Have a Kindle (or think you are getting one for Christmas)? If you want to save some money on books for your Kindle, this site provides convenient access to thousands of free downloads. Some are older, public domain titles, but many are recent books by authors anxious to connect with future paying customers:

LINK

Monday, December 02, 2013

WI-FI GUARD

SoftPerfect Wi-Fi Guard can help ensure that your wi-fi connection stays secure. It keeps track of all the gadgets using your network, and can allow you to quickly spot hackers/freeloaders:

LINK

NOTE: To download, you’ll need to scroll all the way down to the box that says “Download Wi-Fi Guard.” There are free versions for Windows, Mac, and Linux.

SOLDIERS’ DREAMS

Civil War soldiers often had dreams (including--gasp--many pertaining to the opposite sex), and often recorded them in letters home:

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YOUR COMPUTER’S LAST GAP

The average lifespan of a desktop/laptop is four-six years. This article helps you figure out if your computer is ready to shuffle off this mortal coil:

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BUY A MEMORY OF STL AT MHM

Through the month of December, spend $50 or more and receive free shipping on archival prints from the Missouri History Museum's collection! Visit our Cross-Collection Search and look for the green "Buy Print" button to view a gallery of some of our most popular images. Or, browse through our entire online collections, view any image you like, and use the "Buy a Print" button to place an order. Enter coupon code: Holiday2013 at checkout.

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FIFTY FOR XMAS

Fifty great gift ideas especially for genealogists, courtesy of the One Rhode Island Family blog:

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Friday, November 29, 2013

THE NORTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL REGISTER

Hathaway, J. R. B. The North Carolina Historical And Genealogical Register. Baltimore: Genealogical Pub. Co., vols. 1-3 (1900-1903):

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THE SOUTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE

Carolina Historical Society. The South Carolina Historical And Genealogical Magazine. Charleston, S.C.: South Carolina Historical Society, vols. 1-23 (1900-1922):

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INDEX TO AMERICAN GENEALOGIES

Durrie, Daniel S. 1819-1892. Index to American Genealogies: And to Genealogical Material Contained In All Works Such As Town Histories. 5th ed. Albany, N. Y.: J. Munsell's Sons, 1900.

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GENEALOGY: A WEEKLY JOURNAL OF AMERICAN ANCESTRY

Weeks, Lyman Horace, and William Montgomery Clemens. Genealogy: a Weekly Journal of American Ancestry. New York, N.Y.: [William M. Clemens, Publisher], 1912-1921, 9 vols.

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Monday, November 25, 2013

DEFRAGGLER

Windows has a built-in disk defragmenter, but you may find that you like this free one even better:

LINK

2012 AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY

This statistical update from the U.S. Census Bureau is scheduled to be released on 17 December 2013:

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DON’T BE A TOTAL LOSER

That is to say, take steps now to ensure that losing your purse or wallet (should that unfortunate event ever happen to you) causes the least amount of pain possible:

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VLC MEDIA PLAYER

Need a versatile, free media player? Look no further:

LINK

THE OTHER LETTERMAN

This Letterman (Dr. Jonathan Letterman) was responsible for advances in treatment of the wounded that saved the lives of thousands of Civil War soldiers:

LINK

Wednesday, November 20, 2013

NATIONAL GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY QUARTERLY

Available full-text at Hathi Trust:

National Genealogical Society Quarterly. Washington, DC: National Genealogical Society, 1912-1920 (vols. 1-8).

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YIPPY!

Are you tired of racy/suggestive search results (or wish to shield your kids/grandkids from such results)? Yippy is a search engine designed with that in mind:

LINK

IS ONE ENOUGH?

In this day and age, running one type of security software is probably not enough to keep your computer safe. Here’s a simple guide to the types of security software (most with good free versions) that you probably should be using:

LINK

Monday, November 18, 2013

THE U.S.-MEXICAN WAR (1846-1848)

Loads of historical information provided courtesy of the Descendants of Mexican War Veterans:

LINK

KEEP YOUR DRIVE ALIVE

Constantly getting “low disk space” messages from your computer? There are several easy, low-tech ways to free up drive space:

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ARMING THE FLEET

Trying to find a gift for that former Navy man (or woman) who has everything? This book about the Navy weapons research facility in the Mojave Desert (yes, the Mojave Desert) might be just the ticket:

LINK

Friday, November 15, 2013

SPOOKY SPOTS

Does the Show Me State have ghosties and ghoulies? You betcha!

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PTSD IS NOTHING NEW

PTSD (Post-traumatic stress disorder) has been around as long as men (and now women) have waged war--it just took a long time for doctors and the big brass to realize that it isn’t a synonym for cowardice or malingering:

LINK

COUNTING EVERYONE

Counting Everyone: Using Federal Census Records to Find Your Ancestors

Saturday, November 16 from 10:00 – 11:30 a.m.

Everyone counts! The census documents people from all walks of life: immigrants and store clerks to celebrities and everyday people. This course will introduce beginning genealogists to the U.S. Federal Census, 1790-1940, while providing direction on how and where to start researching your family history. Learn to discover clues, codes, and other telling details about your ancestors’ lives.

To make a reservation for this free workshop, please call 816-268-8000 or email us here.

HANDLING DESTRUCTIVE MALWARE

These tips from the U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT) are probably most useful for IT people/computer geeks, but I know some of you folks fall into those categories:

LINK

BATTLE OF PEA RIDGE, ARKANSAS

On March 7-8, 1862, 26,000 soldiers fought here to decide the fate of Missouri and the West. Pea Ridge is not only one of the most pivotal Civil War battles—it is also the most intact Civil War battlefield in the United States:

LINK

CIVIL WAR VETS BURIED IN WASHINGTON STATE

If you've lost track of a Civil War vet, maybe he moved to Washington State. You don't have to register to use this site, and you can search by surname only:

LINK

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

MISSOURI TORNADOES 1950-1995

Looking at this lengthy list of tornadoes that occurred in the Show Me State during the time period indicated, I find it surprising that the number of persons killed is so low:

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MISSOURI GHOST TOWNS

If your ancestor’s Missouri town appears to have been erased from present-day maps of the Show Me State, maybe you’ll find it here:

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THE GENEALOGICAL EXCHANGE

Available full-text at Hathi Trust:

Fernald, Natalie R. The Genealogical Exchange. Buffalo, N.Y.: [s.n.], 1904-1911 (vols. 1-7).

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THE EWING GENEALOGY WITH COGNATE BRANCHES

Available full-text at Hathi Trust:

Ewing, Presley Kittredge.The Ewing Genealogy With Cognate Branches. Houston: Hercules Ptg. & Book Co., 1919.

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EASY DUPLICATE FILE FINDER

Free application that helps you locate and remove duplicate files:

LINK

NOTES: 1. If a file brought up during a search for duplicates looks like a Windows system file (or if you just aren't sure)--keep it!

2. Ignore the first Download buttons you see (they're for a paid advertiser)--use one of the buttons at the bottom of the page.

Sunday, November 10, 2013

IMAGES OF THE 1951 KANSAS CITY FLOOD

The 1951 flood was one of the most devastating natural events in the Kansas City area. The photographer of these 30 images is unknown:

LINK

KANSAS CITY PARKS AND RECREATION

Did a relative work for the Kansas City Parks and Recreation Department (or do you just have great memories of happy hours spent cavorting in one or more Kansas City parks)? The Parks and Recreation Department Archives makes historical material available for viewing including microfilm copies of Board of Parks Commissioners Minutes and related papers; Parks and Recreation Department scrapbooks (1892-1916, 1939-1962, 1965-1969); and other departmental documents. In addition, the archives holdings include photographs and an architectural drawing collection that chronicles the history of Kansas City Parks and Boulevards that may be viewed at the Archives.

The Archives are located at 4600 E. 63rd Street Trafficway, Kansas City, MO 64130-4629. Hours are 9 a.m.--4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday; closed on federal holidays. It is recommended that you call before you visit: 816-513-7643 for general archival inquiries or for architectural drawing information.

LINK

IN LIVING COLOR

When we look at photos taken during wartime, up to and including World War II, we expect to see black-and-white photos. It’s therefore fairly disconcerting to see color photos of wartime scenes, like these World War I images:

LINK

NEW: MY ANCESTOR ACTIVITY BOOKS

Announcing the "My Ancestor" Activity Books for Youth
Pre-Orders being taken now for Thanksgiving Delivery

Studies show that greater knowledge about family history especially strengthens and empowers youth by creating self-esteem, resilience and a greater sense of control over their lives. Studying the family's past also strengthens the relationships between living family members by creating a shared experience and core identity that no one else in the world can duplicate.

To help families achieve these great benefits, we've produced the new Zap The Grandma Gap "My Ancestor" Activity Books. These 52 page activity books are designed for children 6-14 years old to help create stronger bonds in modern families by encouraging the whole family to learn about their ancestors together. Young people can take the lead to accomplish the activities in this book with their family members. As it is filled out, the activity book becomes a new family keepsake to pass down to future generations. First in the series:

My British Ancestor Activity Book
My Civil War Ancestor Activity Book
My German Ancestor Activity Book
My Swedish Ancestor Activity Book

For more info or to order:

LINK

JFK ASSASSINATION

The assassination of John Fitzgerald Kennedy, the 35th president of the United States, is an iconic tragedy seared into the consciousness of anyone living that day: November 22, 1963. Even those who weren't born yet, or were too young to remember the event, know the history, have seen the headlines, or have watched video footage of how an assassin's bullet shattered a man, his family, and a nation.

News spread quickly. Within hours, hurried accounts of the event were published in the papers.

A brief account here cannot adequately commemorate President Kennedy, describe the events of that day and the weeks that followed, nor describe the impact his assassination had on the country. This month, fifty years later, first-person accounts and moving tributes will fill our news feeds, make their way to television, and absorb our attention in private and public venues.

Fifty years later, we at Fold3 commemorate JFK's legacy beyond his tragic and untimely death. We join the world in paying tribute to the life and memory of John Fitzgerald Kennedy.

Visit John F. Kennedy's Fold3 Memorial Page.

Explore headline news from November 22, 1963, and the days that followed, on Newspapers.com via their blog (and be sure to check out reader comments--very interesting).

Saturday, November 09, 2013

MISSOURI DIGITAL NEWSPAPER PROJECT

The State Historical Society of Missouri is pleased to present a growing collection of digitized historic newspapers. These images are freely available to the public and are keyword-searchable.

LINK

MISSOURI HISTORICAL REVIEW

Missouri Historical Review. Columbia, Mo.: State Historical Society of Missouri, 1906-1922, vol.1-16.

LINK

LOCAL HISTORY AND GENEALOGY RESEARCH GUIDES

Dozens of guides created by librarians of The Kansas City Public Library:

LINK

GOING GREEN!

The National Archives is going green. For the remainder of 2013, the Archives will only send out information regarding programs and workshops via email. If we don’t have your e-address on file, please send an email with your preferred email address to kansascity.educate@nara.gov or call 816-268-8000. By providing your e-address, you grant the National Archives at Kansas City permission to send you information about upcoming exhibitions, special events, and programs.

CASUALTIES FROM IRAQ AND AFGHANISTAN CONFLICTS

Three new titles have been added to a Fold3 collection called Casualties from Iraq and Afghanistan Conflicts. Named for three separate military operations, each title includes the names and related personal and service information for over six thousand men and women who died in Iraq and Afghanistan since 2001.

While the three record sets include “casualties” in their titles, they only contain records for those killed, not wounded. They include:

Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) Casualties "Operation Enduring Freedom" (OEF) is the operational codename given by the United States government to the War in Afghanistan which began in 2001 and is currently an ongoing conflict.

Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) Casualties "Operation Iraqi Freedom" (OIF) is the operational codename given by the United States government to the conflict in Iraq from 2003-2010.

Operation New Dawn (OND) Casualties "Operation New Dawn" (OND) is the operational codename given by the United States government for U.S. involvement in Iraq after Operation Iraqi Freedom ended on August 31, 2010.

Every casualty links to a Memorial Page with a summary and personal details including full name, branch of service, pay grade and rank, unit, casualty location, date of death, age, residence, and more. In addition to searching for a name, you can also search on other details such as unit number, rank, date of death, or city of residence.

INTRODUCING THE HONOR WALL

Unveiled this week in honor of Veterans Day, the Fold3 Honor Wall pays tribute to millions of men and women who served our nation, from colonial days to the present.

We invite you to visit the Honor Wall and help us pay tribute to America's veterans by sharing your own memories, stories, and photos of a loved one. Whether you have family or friends serving now, or have ancestors who fought in the Revolutionary War or other conflicts in between, join us in commemorating them. With your help, the Honor Wall will keep their stories alive.

The Honor Wall hosts millions of names, yet it's just the beginning of a monumental tribute that will grow through your contributions. We've redesigned the Fold3 Memorial Pages to include representations of service, along with life events, photos, stories, documents, and connections to family members.

Search for those you know—ancestors, friends, fellow service members, family members, or perhaps you! If you find who you're looking for, add your own dedication. If you can't locate a Memorial Page for someone, create one of your own and add it to the Honor Wall. It's easy!

Just follow the prompts to choose the conflict in which someone served, then add more facts about the individual, including military service. The "Find more records" button will even give you links to possible matches to records on Fold3, Newspapers.com, and Ancestry.com.

Once you've contributed to the Honor Wall, let others know. Choose the "Share" link at the bottom of any Memorial Page. Spread the word, and help us commemorate all of America's heroes.

View sample Memorial Pages for ideas of how you can create or add to your family’s pages.

• Civil War: Robert E. Lee

• WWII: Jimmy Stewart

• Vietnam War: Larry Oakley

• Persian Gulf War: Ann Dunwoody

StLGS UPCOMING EVENTS

St. Louis Genealogical Society is sponsoring a number of upcoming events:

Dec1, 2013—StLGS Book Jamboree (Christmas gifts?)

Mar 7, 2014—StLGS Trivia Night (always a fun night—I’ll see you there!)

Apr 26, 2014—StLGS Annual Family History Fair (a great day attending classes, shopping the vendors, and meeting new people)

Saturday, November 02, 2013

LOCAL HISTORY INDEX

This valuable resource is an index to numerous articles in magazines, newsletters, newspapers, books, as well as factual entries on topics of interest to the Missouri Valley area and Kansas City specifically. It currently consists of more than 36,000 records. Entries are added daily by our librarians. To view most of these items, you can visit the Missouri Valley Room or (where applicable) write document@kclibrary.org to request a photocopy:

LINK

CIVIL WAR ON THE WESTERN BORDER

This website engages Civil War buffs, scholars, students, and local residents in research and discussion on the Missouri-Kansas Border War that shook the region from 1854 to 1865. Through a collaborative effort among libraries, museums, and historical societies across the greater Kansas City region, the project provides free access to selected primary source materials and adds unique interactive features and a thematic layer of original scholarly essays and topical encyclopedia entries:

LINK

FINDING YOUR YANKS (OR REBS)

Finding Your Civil War Ancestors

Dennis Northcott, Associate Archivist for Reference at the Missouri History Museum, will show us the most effective ways to locate our Civil War ancestors. Mr. Northcott will explain what historical records are available, where to find them, and how to retrieve them for our family history research.

When: Wednesday, November 20, 6:30 p.m.
Where: Genealogy and Local History Library, 401 State St., Alton, Illinois.
How much: Free. Register at 1-800-613-3163.

FINDING THEM AT MHM

Finding Your Ancestors at the Missouri History Museum Library & Research Center

Associate Archivist Dennis Northcott will describe the resources available at the Missouri History Museum Library and Research Center as well as the website, which may help you research your St. Louis-area family members.

When: Tuesday, November 12, 2013, 7 p.m.
Where: Kathryn Linnemann Branch, St. Charles City-County Library, 2323 Elm St., St. Charles, MO.
How much: Free. Registration is required.

Friday, November 01, 2013

FREE GENEALOGY WORKSHOPS AT NARA-KC

The National Archives at Kansas City will offer two free genealogy workshops in November. Both workshops will be held at 400 West Pershing Road, Kansas City, Missouri.

Workshop Descriptions:

Dawes Rolls Decoded: Understanding Records of the Five Civilized Tribes
Wednesday, November 6 from 10:00 – 11:30 a.m.

Dawes Records, created between 1898 and 1914, provide detailed information regarding tribal citizenship for members of the Five Civilized Indian Tribes: Cherokee, Chickasaw, Creek, Choctaw, and Seminole. Learn about the history of these records, how to search for them, and how to avoid common assumptions and pitfalls.

Counting Everyone: Using Federal Census Records to Find Your Ancestors
Saturday, November 16 from 10:00 – 11:30 a.m.

Everyone counts! The Census documents people from all walks of life: immigrants and store clerks to celebrities and everyday people. This course will introduce beginning genealogists to the U.S. Federal Census, 1790-1940, while providing direction on how and where to start researching your family history. Learn to discover clues, codes, and other telling details about your ancestors’ lives.

To make a reservation for these free workshops, please call 816-268-8000 or email us here.

Monday, October 28, 2013

POLISH GENEALOGY & HERALDRY: AN INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH

Available full-text at Hathi Trust:

Hoskins, Janina W.Polish Genealogy & Heraldry: an Introduction to Research. Washington: Library of Congress, 1987.

LINK

SURGEON IN BLUE

New book for those interested in Civil War medicine (and gift idea for the Civil War buff in your family):

LINK

THE SKINNY ON KANSAS CITY

Planning a research trip to the Kansas City, Missouri area? This guide provides links to area archives and libraries; historical societies; and museums and historic sites:

LINK

SANBORN MAPS OF MISSOURI

The Sanborn Fire Insurance Map Company (established 1867) created maps of U.S. cities and towns for the fire insurance industry to assess the risk of insuring a particular property. The maps are large scale plans of a city or town drawn at a scale of 50 feet to an inch, offering detailed information on the use made of commercial and industrial buildings, their size, shape, and construction material. Some residential areas are also mapped. The maps show location of water mains, fire alarms and fire hydrants. They are color-coded to identify the structure (adobe, frame, brick, stone, and iron) of each building.

Between 1955 and 1978, the Library of Congress withdrew duplicate sheets and atlases from their collection and offered them to selected libraries. Maps for Missouri towns and cities were given to the MU Libraries. Documenting the layout of 390 Missouri cities from 1883 to 1951, the University of Missouri-Columbia Ellis Library Special Collections Department has digitized 6,798 of the maps for Missouri cities from 1880 to 1922:

LINK

Friday, October 25, 2013

SLPL UPCOMING PROGRAMS

The following talks at St. Louis Public Library’s Central Library are free and open to the public. Note: parking is no longer free at meters on Saturdays. Library patrons may park for free on our lot at the NW corner of 15th & Olive Streets (directly behind the Campbell House Museum—pick up a parking token at the entrance desks on Locust or Olive Streets when entering the Library). Questions? Email me at tpearson@slpl.org.

Sat, Nov 16, 2013, 10:30 AM-Noon. Squeezing Your Sources: Getting All the Info You Can From Military Service and Pension Records. Central Library, 2nd Floor, Training Room. Tom Pearson describes ways to extract all the info you possibly can from compiled military service records and pension records. To register/more info, email us at tpearson@slpl.org.

Saturday, December 14, 2013, 10:30 am-Noon. Killed by the Cure: Civil War Medicine. Central Library. 2nd Floor, Training Room. Tom Pearson discusses book, manuscript, microfilm, and Internet sources of information on typical illnesses and injuries suffered by Civil War soldiers, and the methods Civil War doctors and nurses employed to try and heal them. To register or for more info, email us at tpearson@slpl.org.

Saturday, January 18, 2014, 10:30 am-Noon. Squeezing Your Sources: Getting the Most from Local & County Histories. Central Library. 2nd Floor, Training Room. Tom Pearson shows genealogists how to get the most information possible from town and county histories. To register/more information: tpearson@slpl.org.

Saturday, February 8, 2014, 10:30 am-Noon. Heroes of the USCT (United States Colored Troops). Central Library. 2nd Floor, Training Room. Tom Pearson discusses book, manuscript, microfilm, and Internet sources of information on the struggles and triumphs of African American Civil War soldiers. To register/more information: tpearson@slpl.org.

Saturday, March 22, 2014, 10:30 am-Noon. The Price is Right: the Genealogist’s Guide to Free Stuff on the Internet. Central Library. 2nd Floor, Training Room. Tom Pearson shows genealogists sites where they can access genealogical databases for free, and find free digitized books; newspapers; magazines; forms & charts; clip art; images & photographs; maps; music; and podcasts, plus sites they can use to create free blogs & websites. To register/more information: tpearson@slpl.org.

Central Library
1301 Olive Street
St. Louis, MO 63103

PERIODICALS SPOTLIGHT: FAMILY TREE MAGAZINE

Family Tree Magazine

Lots of articles of interest in their October/November 2013 issue:

Rediscovering Slave Burial Sites (a new project is cataloging such locations)

Cutting Teeth (how your ancestors cared for their teeth)

Migration Melodies (how did they get from there to here?)

Burned Out? (a five-step plan to rebuild your tree from archival ashes)

Time-Saving Tech Tools (17 apps and online tools for organization and time management)

Death Records Workbook (what are they; how do you find them; and what other types of record can provide death info)

Going to Church (a guide to German church records)

Movie Moments (converting old home movies to digital format)

Top Free Sites for Online Newspapers (includes a guide to digital yearbooks)

You can read this magazine (and other issues of this title, plus numerous other genealogy magazines) in the Genealogy Room at Central Library (St. Louis); the Midwest Genealogy Center (Independence, Missouri); or the Jefferson County Library (High Ridge Branch).

Genealogy pages on the SLPL website

Midwest Genealogy Center

Jefferson County Library

PERIODICALS SPOTLIGHT: FAMILY CHRONICLE

Family Chronicle: the How-to Guide to Tracing Your Ancestors

If you’ve never read an issue of this bi-monthly magazine, I think you’re in for a pleasant surprise. Each issue features articles designed to help you research ancestors from a particular country, state, or locality; work with particular types of records; or generally become a better, more skillful genealogist.

For example, the September/October 2013 issue features these articles:

Five Reasons Why the Records Aren’t in the Courthouse (some reasons are obvious, others not so much)

Wooden Shoe genealogy: Finding Your Dutch and Frisian Ancestors, Part I (Frisians reside in the northern parts of the Netherlands and Germany and—naturally—speak Frisian)

How to Find Dead People in Chicago (in cemeteries, of course--what were you thinking?)

Processioners’ Books (a closer look at a record with roots in medieval England)

Follow the Luther Trail (discovering your Lutheran ancestors)

You can read this magazine (and other issues of this title) in the Genealogy Room at Central Library (St. Louis) or at Midwest Genealogy Center.

Genealogy pages on the SLPL website

Midwest Genealogy Center

PRESERVATION MATTERS

The National Archives at Kansas City will be offering Preservation Matters: Dos and Don’ts, Digital Records, and Disaster Response on Saturday, November 2. The event will feature workshops from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., and a Preservation One-on-One clinic from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. The presenters include staff members from the National Archives at Kansas City and the Harry S. Truman Presidential Library and Museum. The event will be held at 400 West Pershing Road, Kansas City, Missouri 64108.

Workshop Descriptions:

8:30 – 9:20 a.m.
Preservation Myths: The Things We Do…and What We Should Do Instead

Have you ever opened a box of priceless family records, only to find them torn, brittle, and damaged? Have you tried to fix the damage yourself? You may be surprised to learn that some of these “fixes” irreparably harm fragile documents. Learn how to best care for your paper-based records before the damage occurs.

9:30 – 10:20 a.m.
Caring for Your Family Treasures

Are you hanging on to your wedding dress in the hopes that one day your daughter or granddaughter will wear it? What about all that family china and sterling silver flatware you use at Thanksgiving? Learn how to care for and store your family treasures, and make sure they last for the next generations!

10:30 – 11:20 a.m.
Preserving Your Digital Heritage

In the past, your family’s photographic collection probably consisted of prints made with a single family camera. In the 21st century, we’ve gone digital with our phones, tablets, computers, and cameras. Technology has made it easier to capture memories, but has complicated the process of storing them. This session will show you how to organize, centralize, and protect your collections.

11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
All Wet! Responding to Floods, Leaks, and Other Damp Disasters

It’s bound to happen. A pipe will burst or a leaky roof will drip, and family papers, books, and photos will be awash in water. Learn quick response tips to salvage sodden heirlooms, and stop or prevent mold damage. Pick up practical advice on spotting disasters just waiting to happen.

12:30 – 2:30 p.m.
Preservation One-on-One Clinic - by reservation only

Reserve your 15-minute time slot to bring a single item to the Preservation One-on-One clinic, and receive personal advice on how to preserve it. Call 816-268-8000 or email us here to save a seat.

To make a reservation for these free events, please call 816-268-8000 or email us here.

BANNED

Interesting page on the National Archives (AUS) website that looks at books banned in Australia at various times, including Lolita, Brave New World, and Peyton Place, to name just a few. Why were they banned? In the case of Peyton Place, a censor voting to ban the book noted that,

‘It is unfortunate that Mrs. Metalious is so flustered with sex, for she often writes well.’

LINK

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

PORTALS TO STATE HISTORY SITES

List of 71 general-interest portals to state historical resources:

LINK

WAR MEMORIAL ALBUM

A digital album of photographs and service information about 93 Missouri State University--Springfield students and alumni who lost their lives during World War I, World War II, and the Korean Conflict:

LINK

MISSOURI COUNTY MANUSCRIPTS

Most of us know that the State Historical Society of Missouri owns a huge manuscript collection, but what manuscripts in that collection deal with counties that your ancestors lived in? This online finding aid sorts it out for you:

LINK

MORE THAN JUST SHIP PASSENGER ARRIVAL LISTS

The National Archives at Kansas City will be offering one free genealogy workshop in October. More Than Just Ship Passenger Arrival Lists will be held on Wednesday, October 30, from 10:00-11:30 a.m. The workshop will be held at 400 West Pershing Road, Kansas City, Missouri.

Workshop Description:

More Than Just Ship Passenger Arrival Lists
Wednesday, October 30, 2013 at 10:00-11:30 a.m.

The breadth of immigration records available online and in archives can seem overwhelming. Come learn what original records you can find at the National Archives and what you can discover online. Records range from passport applications, naturalization documents, ship passenger lists, and more!

To make a reservation for this free workshop, please call 816-268-8000 or email us here.

BOONE COUNTY PROBATE INDICES NOW AVAILABLE ONLINE

September 26, 2013— The Boone County probate indices are now available online. With the help of the Secretary of State’s State Archives Local Records Division, the massive volumes have all been scanned at no cost to Boone County.

Individuals searching for historical knowledge often turn to probate records for information about their ancestors’ estates which may shed some light on lives otherwise lost in time. Previously, the indices were only located in the Boone County Courthouse, which proved frustrating for those who made the trip to the courthouse only to find no records that pertain to them. Now, genealogists can search the probate indices in the comfort of their own home. If their search is fruitless, they have saved themselves a trip to the courthouse; if the search reveals the existence of probate documents, they can go the courthouse with identifying information in hand to expedite their search. This is an especially helpful tool for those researchers not located near Boone County.

This technological advance is more than a convenience for family historians. It will also help preserve the historical value of the books for years to come by significantly reducing the daily wear and tear on these large volumes. Currently, no probate files are available online; however, the long-term goal is to scan the estate cases currently on microfilm to make them available electronically as well. For more information or to search the probate indices go here.

Sunday, October 20, 2013

ST. LOUIS MEDIA HISTORY FOUNDATION

My friend Frank Absher is Executive Director of this organization. If you’re seeking info on St. Louis radio or TV stations; advertising agencies; or the print media, visit their spiffy-looking website:

LINK

STONE QUARRIES AND BEYOND

Looking for info on Missouri stone quarries, quarry workers, stone cutters or stone carvers? Start your search here:

LINK

MISSOURI DIGITAL LIBRARY

I know some of you are already familiar with this site, but the rest of you are in for a treat--it provides numerous links to digitized books; periodical articles; pamphlets and brochures; and images and maps:

LINK

JAVA AND JRE

Have questions about Java and Java Runtime Environment (JRE)--for instance, what are they? This page has some (easy-to-follow) answers:

LINK

Thursday, October 17, 2013

ST. JOSEPH MUSEUMS, INC.

Interested in Buchanan County ancestors, or just plain fascinated by St. Joe history? This site provides access to info on four St. Joe museums:

LINK

NEGRO LEAGUES BASEBALL MUSEUM

Founded in 1990, this private, non-profit museum in Kansas City, Missouri is dedicated to preserving the history of African-American baseball in America:

LINK

NOTE: I created this list of guys who played for the St. Louis Stars or St. Louis Giants ball teams between 1910-1943:

LINK

LUTHERAN CHURCH RECORDS ONLINE

Researching Lutheran ancestors, or interested in a particular Lutheran church or pastor? Check here:

LINK

A DIGEST OF THE MILITARY AND NAVAL LAWS OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES

Available via the Documenting the American South website:

LINK

ABOUT GOOGLE

Want to find out more about Google (the mega-corporation)? Their own “About Google” website is a very good starting point:

LINK

Saturday, October 12, 2013

AMERICAN LIFE HISTORIES

This collection of life histories consists of approximately 2,900 documents, compiled and transcribed by more than 300 writers from 24 states, working on the Folklore Project of the Federal Writers’ Project, a New Deal jobs program that was part of the U.S. Works Progress (later Work Projects) Administration (WPA) from 1936 to 1940. Typically 2,000-15,000 words in length, the documents vary in form from narratives to dialogues to reports to case histories. They chronicle vivid life stories of Americans who lived at the turn of the century and include tales of meeting Billy the Kid, surviving the 1871 Chicago fire, pioneer journeys out West, grueling factory work, and the immigrant experience.

LINK

FAMILY HISTORY BOOKS

Family History Books is a collection of more than 80,000 digitized genealogy and family history publications from the archives of some of the most important family history libraries in the world. The collection includes family histories, county and local histories, genealogy magazines and how-to books, gazetteers, and medieval histories and pedigrees.

LINK

CLAY COUNTY ARCHIVES AND HISTORICAL LIBRARY

Clay County Archives and Historical Library is located in Liberty, Missouri. It is a non-profit corporation, organized as a depository and research center for original Clay County Records. The Board of Directors is composed of representatives of Clay County museums, genealogical groups, historical societies and patriotic organizations.

LINK

RESOURCES FOR GENEALOGY AND FAMILY HISTORY

This resources page on the Midwest Genealogy Center website offers holdings guides, topical guides, and free genealogy forms in PDF format:

LINK

MISSOURI MAPS FROM THE PERRY-CASTANEDA LIBRARY COLLECTION

Digitized Missouri maps from this outstanding University of Texas map collection:

LINK

Tuesday, October 08, 2013

BARRY COUNTY NEWS

The Springfield News-Leader reports that state archivists and Missouri State University students will clean, repair, arrange and index 19th century Barry County Circuit Court records. Once those records are studied and processed, the archival work will shift to other southwest Missouri counties. Completed records will be transported to the Missouri State Archives for preservation imaging.

LINK

UPCOMING EVENTS AT MHM

CITY HOMES AND NEIGHBORHOODS

Join Lynn Josse, an architectural historian with the Preservation Research Office, as she shares her expertise on researching St. Louis City homes and neighborhoods. Learn about resources and strategies she uses to delve into St. Louis's architectural history.

When: Saturday, October 19, 2013, 10:30 a.m.
Where: Missouri History Museum, AT&T Foundation Multipurpose Room
How much: Free; reservations are not required.

Other upcoming lectures:

THE FORGOTTEN WAR: MISSOURI FROM 1812–1815

Michael Dickey offers a look at Missouri and the “second war for independence,” the War of 1812.

When: Wednesday, November 6, 2013, 10:30 a.m.
Where: Missouri History Museum, McDermott Grand Hall
How much: Free; reservations are not required.

SLAVE ANCESTRAL RESEARCH: TACKLING PRE-1870

Workshop led by Martin Collier.

When: Saturday, November 16, 2013, 1:00 p.m.
Where: Missouri History Museum, AT&T Foundation Multipurpose Room
How much: Free; reservations are not required.

Missouri History Museum

Sunday, October 06, 2013

MISSOURI HISTORY MUSEUM UPDATE

The following sources have recently been added to the Genealogy and Local History Index.

1. Program for the May Festival Grand Ball given by the St. Louis Chapter No. 53, Order of Ahepa, May 16, 1937

2. Mid Channel: Class of 1910, Mary Institute, June 1935

3. The Nugget / published by the students of William McKinley High School [St. Louis], 1937 and 1944

4. Catalogue, The Taylor School, 1933-1934 and 1939-1940

5. Tell-tale (Forest Park University yearbook), 1911

6. Maple Leaves (Maplewood-Richmond Heights High School yearbooks), 1947-1950, 1954-1955

ANCESTRY.COM FREE DATABASES

Dated but still useful list of free Ancestry.com databases. In some cases access to index and database content is free; sometimes only use of the index is free.

LINK

ANCESTRY.COM LLC ACQUIRES FIND A GRAVE, INC.

PROVO, Utah, September 30, 2013 – Ancestry.com LLC announced today it has acquired Find A Grave, Inc., the leading online cemetery database.

With over 100 million memorials and 75 million photos, Find A Grave has amassed an unparalleled collection of burial information. Over the past 18 years, it has grown to become an invaluable resource for genealogists, history buffs and cemetery preservationists. Find A Grave will become a wholly owned subsidiary of Ancestry.com, and will continue to be managed by its founder, Jim Tipton.

“Find A Grave is an amazing phenomenon supported by a passionate and engaged community of volunteers around the world,” said Tim Sullivan, CEO of Ancestry.com. “We at Ancestry.com are so excited…honored really…to take on the responsibility of supporting this community. We will maintain Find A Grave as a free website, will retain its existing policies and mode of operation, and look forward to working with Jim Tipton and the entire Find A Grave team to accelerate the development of tools designed to make it even easier for the Find A Grave community to fulfill its original mission to capture every tombstone on Earth.”

Ancestry.com plans to bolster the resources dedicated to Find A Grave to launch a new mobile app, improve customer support, introduce an enhanced edit system for submitting updates to memorials, foreign-language support, and other site improvements.

“Ancestry.com has been a long-time supporter of Find A Grave. They have been linking and driving traffic to the site for several years,” said Jim Tipton, founder of Find A Grave. “Burial information is a wonderful source for people researching their family history and I look forward to working with Ancestry.com to help continue our growth and accelerate the pace of improvements.”

The terms of the transaction were not disclosed.

INKSCAPE

Need a drawing/illustration program, but don’t want to fork over big bucks? Maybe this free program has all the features you need:

LINK

Monday, September 30, 2013

VLC MEDIA PLAYER

Need a versatile, free media player? Look no further:

LINK

72 HOURS

Want (or need) to know what to do in case of a natural (or unnatural) disaster? This site is designed with you in mind:

LINK

PORTALS TO STATE HISTORY SITES

List of 71 general-interest portals to state historical resources:

LINK

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

PLENTY OF BILLS, NOT ENOUGH BULLETS...

The Confederate States of America suffered shortages of nearly everything else, but they experienced no shortage of paper currency—there were a bewildering variety of national and locally produced currencies:

LINK

Note: Unfortunately for the Southern cause, all of that currency started losing value the moment it left the printing press…

DO YOU NEED AN E-READER?

If you own a smartphone or tablet, do you really need a separate e-reader, since there are now apps that allow you to use that smartphone or tablet as an e-reader? The answer: it all depends:

LINK

UPCOMING CIVIL WAR PROGRAMS AT SLPL

The following talks will take place in the Training Room (2nd Floor, Central Library, 1301 Olive Street, St. Louis, MO 63103). Programs are free and open to the public. Note: parking is no longer free at meters on Saturdays. Library patrons may park on our lot at the NW corner of 15th & Olive Streets (directly behind the Campbell House Museum—pick up a parking token at the entrance desks on 1st or 2nd Floor when entering the Library). Questions? Email me at tpearson@slpl.org.

Sat, Nov 16, 2013, 10:30 AM-Noon-- Squeezing Your Sources: Getting All the Info You Can From Military Service and Pension Records. 2nd Floor, Training Room, Central Library. Join us as Tom Pearson describes ways to extract all the info you possibly can from compiled military service records and pension records. Pre-registration recommended but not required. To register or for more info, email us at tpearson@slpl.org.

Saturday, December 14, 2013, 10:30 am-Noon—Killed by the Cure: Civil War Medicine. Central Library. 2nd Floor, Training Room, Central Library. Join us as Tom Pearson discusses book, manuscript, microfilm, and Internet sources of information on typical illnesses and injuries suffered by Civil War soldiers, and the methods Civil War doctors and nurses employed to try and heal them. Pre-registration recommended but not required. To register or for more info, email us at tpearson@slpl.org.

SLPL Calendar of Events

PENSION NUMERICAL INDEX, 1860-1934

The Civil War and Later Veterans Pension Index, one of Fold3's earliest titles, now has a partner in the recently added Pension Numerical Index. Officially called A1158, Numerical Index to Pensions, 1860-1934, this card index from the National Archives is a great cross-referencing tool as it covers pension application and certificate numbers for men who fought in wars prior to, during, or after the Civil War.

Aside from being a rather cool index, cards may include up to twenty names for low numbers and four or five names for higher numbers. It is a helpful resource for confirming hard-to-decipher numbers on other indexes, or for cross-referencing application and certificate numbers.

While mostly comprised of Civil War and later pension numbers, the earliest cards include entries for soldiers in the Indian War, Mexican War, War of 1812, and "Old Wars," this last covering those who served from the end of the Revolutionary War to the beginning of the Civil War (1783-1861).

The cards are presented in numerical order, yet every card is indexed by name as well. The Pension Numerical Index can be used in tandem with other records on Fold3 like the Civil War and Later Veterans Pension Index (T289), and pension files for Revolutionary War, War of 1812, and Civil War. Let's look at a few examples.

Both Army and Navy certificate numbers are referenced. Search for a sailor named John C. Joyce and you'll find the51169 index card on which Joyce is one of five pensioners listed. The other four entries reference Army pensioners by application and certificate numbers. We also find Joyce's pension certificate #36486 cross-referenced on the card. After locating his file within the Navy Survivors' Certificates on Fold3, we find number 36486 indexed with his name, and it appears on many of the documents. Application "No. 51169" is noted on page 19 of Joyce's 89-page file.

A search for Peter Eckley brings us to a card numbered 84353. His name appears in the section for Army certificate numbers of dependants. Eckley was in the Indiana Infantry, Regiment 91, Company H, but the dependant in this case is his widow, Eliza Ann—noted by the "W" on the index card under "service." Of interest within her 42-page pension file are a Fort Wayne undertaker's receipt and a letter to her doctor acknowledging that the government will pay $10 of his bill for $354.75.

Imagine the long history of American military service indexed via the extremely large number of pensioners recorded on these cards. If a serviceman's story isn’t available yet on Fold3 within its extensive sets of military pension files, you can use the information on the Pension Numerical Index to order files from NARA.

Fold3.com

Saturday, September 21, 2013

NATIONAL HOBO CONVENTION

If it’s September, you just missed the National Hobo Convention, held every year in August in Britt, Iowa:

LINK

VINTAGE CANBERRA

Facebook page of the National Archives of Australia that features vintage photos taken in and around Canberra:

LINK

THE MELANCHOLY HARVEST

Furnishing artificial limbs to Civil War amputees was a complicated undertaking for both North and South, as a recent book amply demonstrates:

LINK

LEE’S LIFELINE

Many felt that Charleston (SC) was the major port on the south Atlantic coast—but an influential few knew that Wilmington (NC) was in fact Robert E. Lee’s lifeline:

LINK

Wednesday, September 18, 2013

GLORY DAYS

OK—-it’s not genealogy-related, but these vintage Hollywood movie posters (brought to the Web courtesy of Los Angeles Public Library) are just gorgeous:

LINK

NOTE: Their Travel Posters collection is also most impressive!

ATTACK IF PRACTICABLE

Note to Robert E. Lee: if you really want one of your generals to attack, you might consider wording your attack order differently:

LINK

BREAKTHROUGH IN WEST AFRICAN ETHNICITY RESEARCH

Using unique proprietary DNA samples and a variety of statistical approaches, the Ancestry DNA science team has been able to separate West Africa into six separate population groups based on genetic data. This advancement will provide a finer-resolution genetic ethnicity estimate for individuals with West African ancestry:

LINK

HISTORICAL HURRICANE TRACKS

We haven't had much hurricane activity so far this season, but it's not over yet...

See how your hometown (or favorite summer beach getaway destination) has been affected by hurricanes in graphic format:

LINK

DON’T PANIC—IT’S COMING BACK!

Sad because “Who Do You Think You Are?” new episodes have already ended? Don’t be—it’s coming back in 2014, with 10 new episodes (two more than this season):

LINK

PRESERVATION MATTERS

The National Archives at Kansas City will be offering Preservation Matters: Dos and Don’ts, Digital Records, and Disaster Response on Saturday, October 5. The event will feature workshops from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., and a Preservation One-on-One clinic from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. The presenters include staff members from the National Archives at Kansas City and the Harry S. Truman Presidential Library and Museum. The event will be held at 400 West Pershing Road, Kansas City, Missouri 64108.

Workshop Descriptions:

8:30 – 9:20 a.m.
Preservation Myths: The Things We Do…and What We Should Do Instead
Have you ever opened a box of priceless family records, only to find them torn, brittle, and damaged? Have you tried to fix the damage yourself? You may be surprised to learn that some of these “fixes” irreparably harm fragile documents. Learn how to best care for your paper-based records before the damage occurs.

9:30 – 10:20 a.m.
Caring for Your Family Treasures
Are you hanging on to your wedding dress in the hopes that one day your daughter or granddaughter will wear it? What about all that family china and sterling silver flatware you use at Thanksgiving? Learn how to care for and store your family treasures, and make sure they last for the next generations!

10:30 – 11:20 a.m.
Preserving Your Digital Heritage
In the past, your family’s photographic collection probably consisted of prints made with a single family camera. In the 21st century, we’ve gone digital with our phones, tablets, computers, and cameras. Technology has made it easier to capture memories, but has complicated the process of storing them. This session will show you how to organize, centralize, and protect your collections.

11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
All Wet! Responding to Floods, Leaks, and Other Damp Disasters
It’s bound to happen. A pipe will burst or a leaky roof will drip, and family papers, books, and photos will be awash in water. Learn quick response tips to salvage sodden heirlooms, and stop or prevent mold damage. Pick up practical advice on spotting disasters just waiting to happen.

12:30 – 2:30 p.m.
Preservation One-on-One Clinic - by reservation only
Reserve your 15-minute time slot to bring a single item to the Preservation One-on-One clinic, and receive personal advice on how to preserve it. Call 816-268-8000 or email kansascity.archives@nara.gov to save a seat.

To make a reservation for these free events, please call 816-268-8000 or email kansascity.archives@nara.gov.

Sunday, September 15, 2013

INTERNATIONAL MILITARY DIGEST

A free PDF of the entire 232-page September 1915 issue of this periodical:

LINK

LIBRE OFFICE

Need a good word processing suite, but Microsoft Office is too darn expensive? LibreOffice Productivity Suite might be just the ticket—and it’s free:

LINK

SHELL-SHOCKED: AUSTRALIA AFTER THE ARMISTICE

Australia suffered 200,000 casualties during WWI (killed, wounded, and maimed for life), a huge number given its overall population at the time. This website displays a sample of documents and photos from a touring exhibit put together by the National Archives of Australia:

LINK

THE BATTLE OF CHAPULTEPEC

September 1847 was a volatile and critical month in the Mexican American War. Although an armistice between the U.S. and Mexico was signed on August 24, 1847, it was short-lived and hostilities resumed with battles at Molino del Ray (September 8) and Chapultepec (September 12-13) just outside Mexico City. General Winfield Scott ultimately claimed Mexico City on September 14, forcing General Santa Anna's Mexican troops to abandon the city in defeat.

The Battle of Chapultepec was bloody, long, and difficult. Marines and soldiers scaled the fortress walls and engaged in close hand-to-hand combat toward the end. It is a well-remembered battle of an oft-forgotten war. The Chapultepec fortress was also known as the Halls of Montezuma and is historically significant for the U.S. Marine Corps. Most of the Marines who fought at Chapultepec were killed in the battle. The Corps' official Marines' Hymn memorializes their bravery and losses, as it begins with a phrase referring to the storming of Chapultepec: "From the Halls of Montezuma."

At the Battle of Churubusco, a few weeks earlier, U.S. troops had captured 85 members of the St. Patrick's Battalion, a Mexican artillery unit comprised mostly of Irish Catholic defectors from the U.S. They were court-martialed and fifty were sentenced to be hanged. However, the hanging of thirty of them was delayed to deliver a message. The thirty condemned men stood with nooses around their necks, waiting to be hanged for several hours until the American flag was raised over the fortress of Chapultepec. They were then provided with a final vision of their treachery.

Stonewall Jackson, Robert E. Lee, and Ulysses S. Grant were three of many who became future leaders in the U.S. Civil War, yet began their military careers in battles near Mexico City.

Explore Mexican War Service Records on Fold3 to learn more about those who fought in these and other battles between the U.S. and Mexico. Be sure to locate the Unit Information which precedes individual service records within each military unit for accounts of the battles in which the units were engaged.

FOLD3.COM

Thursday, September 12, 2013

“WHISTLING DICK” AND THE SIEGE OF VICKSBURG

“Whistling Dick” was a Confederate artillery piece whose shells made a distinct whistling noise when fired. U.S. Navy gunners were told to stop targeting it after numerous attempts to do so had failed:

LINK

ATWATER’S SECRET

Dorian Atwater was a Union prisoner at Andersonville who was given the job of recording deaths there. His Confederate captors assured him they would publish that list of names after the war, but Atwater didn’t trust them—-so he secretly kept a copy of his list hidden in the lining of his coat:

LINK

MAKING SENSE OF MEMORY CARDS

Need to buy a memory card for one of your gadgets (or just want to better understand the ones you already own)? This article by Kim Komando will help:

LINK

SODA COURTESY OF THE NAA

SODA is their Stream of Digital Archives page, where they display scanned images of photos, documents, and various Australian government records recently added to their collection:

LINK

BEACONS BY THE SEA

If you're a sucker for lighthouses (guilty as charged), you'll love this exhibit:

The National Archives holds many drawings and plans of lighthouses from across Australia. Although most of these records were created during the colonial period up to 1901, some are as recent as 1968.

The records were transferred to the Commonwealth when it took control of coastal lighthouses from state and territory governments on 1 July 1915.

In 2002 the Archives launched its touring exhibition Beacons by the Sea, which explored the role of lighthouses, from guiding ships to their part in the unification of Australia under Federation.

Among the exhibits were records from series A9568, including plans of the lights, store rooms, watch houses and light keepers' residences.

NOTE: Click on “Series Title,” then “View Digital Copy” to see an image of that lighthouse drawing; then click “Enlarge” to see a larger version of that image. The larger image can be saved to your computer as a JPEG (for purely personal research purposes, of course).

LINK

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

MILITARY AWARDS AND DECORATIONS

If you’ve lost a military award or decoration (or your next-of-kin was entitled to one or more medals), you can request replacements here:

LINK

ANCESTRY.COM CARD CATALOG

Sure, you can use Ancestry.com to search for people, but you’ll often get better results if you search within a specific database, rather than trying to search all of Ancestry at once. To do so, hover over SEARCH in the top menu bar and click on CARD CATALOG.

Now type MISSOURI into the title box (case does not matter in any of the search queries mentioned in this post). My search brought up 282 hits: click on a listed database to search within that database.

Let’s say you are searching for databases with info specifically relating to St. Louis, Missouri. What’s the best way to frame your Ancestry Card Catalog query?

o Doing a title search for ST. LOUIS MISSOURI gets 5 hits.
o Doing a title search for SAINT LOUIS MISSOURI gets 2 hits.
o Doing a title search for SAINT LOUIS gets 5 hits.
o Doing a title search for ST. LOUIS gets 35 hits.

Seems we have a clear winner! However, when using the Ancestry Card Catalog we can also do KEYWORD searches.

o Doing a keyword search for SAINT LOUIS MISSOURI gets 9 hits.
o Doing a keyword search for ST. LOUIS MISSOURI gets 78 hits.
o Doing a keyword search for SAINT LOUIS gets 11 hits.
o Doing a keyword search for ST. LOUIS gets 111 hits.

Once again, seems we have a clear winner, although the contest is a little closer this time.

Now, what if you’re searching a rural county rather than a big city?

o Doing a title search for BOONE COUNTY MISSOURI gets 4 hits.
o Doing a title search for BOONE MISSOURI also gets 4 hits.

It seems to barely matter if you include the word COUNTY in your query, so feel free to omit it (unless you’re searching a very common county name like WASHINGTON or JEFFERSON).

Speaking of Jefferson, you can also check Ancestry Card Catalog to see if it contains any databases specific to a particular city or town.

o Doing a title search for JEFFERSON CITY MISSOURI gets 4 hits.
o Doing a title search for JEFFERSON MISSOURI gets 5 hits (one of which pertains to Jefferson County, Missouri—but Jefferson City is county seat of Cole County).

You’re unlikely to get hits for relatively small cities and towns, but a query in Ancestry Card Catalog only takes a few seconds, so checking won’t take long regardless.

Happy ancestor hunting!

ANCESTRY.COM NEW AND UPDATED DATABASES

You can fairly easily keep track of new and updated databases in Ancestry.com:

LINK

ANCESTRY.COM AND FAMILYSEARCH ANNOUNCE STRATEGIC AGREEMENT

Groundbreaking Agreement to Deliver Valuable Historical Content Over the Next Five Years

PROVO, Utah, September 5, 2013 – Ancestry.com and FamilySearch International (online at FamilySearch.org), the two largest providers of family history resources, announced today an agreement that is expected to make approximately 1 billion global historical records available online and more easily accessible to the public for the first time. With this long-term strategic agreement, the two services will work together with the archive community over the next five years to digitize, index and publish these records from the FamilySearch vault.

The access to the global collection of records marks a major investment in international content as Ancestry.com continues to invest in expanding family history interest in its current markets and worldwide. Ancestry.com expects to invest more than $60 million over the next five years in the project alongside thousands of hours of volunteer efforts facilitated by FamilySearch.

“This agreement sets a path for the future for Ancestry.com and FamilySearch to increasingly share international sets of records more collaboratively,” said Tim Sullivan, CEO of Ancestry.com. “A significant part of our vision for family history is helping provide a rich, engaging experience on a global scale. We are excited about the opportunities it will bring to help benefit the family history community and look forward to collaborating with FamilySearch to identify other opportunities to help people discover and share their family history.”

The organizations will also be looking at other ways to share content across the two organizations. Both organizations expect to add to the already digitized records shared across the two websites in addition to new record projects to be completed over the next five years.

"We are excited to work with Ancestry.com on a vision we both share," said Dennis Brimhall, President of FamilySearch. "Expanding online access to historical records through this type of collaboration can help millions more people discover and share their family's history."

This marks a groundbreaking agreement between the two services. But the two organizations aren’t strangers to working with each other; hundreds of millions of records have already been shared and are available on Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org. The companies also announced in early 2013 an additional project where they plan to publish 140 million U.S. Wills & Probate images and indexes over the next three years—creating a national database of wills and other probate documents spanning 1800-1930 online for the very first time.

About Ancestry.com

Ancestry.com is the world's largest online family history resource with approximately 2.7 million paying subscribers across all its websites. More than 11 billion records have been added to the Ancestry.com sites and users have created more than 50 million family trees containing more than 5 billion profiles. In addition to its flagship site www.ancestry.com, the company operates several Ancestry international websites along with a suite of online family history brands, including Archives.com, Fold3.com and Newspapers.com, all designed to empower people to discover, preserve and share their family history.

About FamilySearch

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch has been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. FamilySearch is a nonprofit organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 4,800 family history centers in 70 countries, including the renowned Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

FAMILY TREE MAKER 2014

It’s time to announce all the greatest new features of Family Tree Maker. We listened to a large range of Family Tree Maker users to improve our features for 2014 including the roll out of the new Family View display, improved TreeSync, more extensive charts and reports, new organizational tools and more. Below is a list of the newly improved features.

1. New Family View — see your family tree in a new way. This additional view makes navigating easier, especially when you want to see extended family members.
2. Improved TreeSync — lets you easily synchronize your tree in Family Tree Maker with an online Ancestry.com tree. 3. A more robust TreeSync™ lets you sync even more of your family tree info.
4. Easily share your tree with your family and work on it together. Family and friends can view the online version of your tree without software or an Ancestry.com subscription.
5. Collaborate with the largest, most active family history community in the world. Keep your online tree private or make it public so that others researching your family can find you. You may connect with others who have insight on your ancestors, discover rare family photos, or even find relatives you didn’t know you had.
6. More organizational tools — stay organized with new tools that let you sort children automatically by birth order and view people by location, grouping them by country, state, county, and city.
7. New and improved charts and reports — more options and views let you display an individual’s ancestors, spouses, and children together. Also, the Index of Individuals Report has been expanded with options for anniversary, birthday, and contact lists and more.
8. New tree branch export — a new export option makes it much simpler to export a single branch of your tree.
9. More editing options — save time with the ability to copy and paste facts including related source citations, media items, and notes.
10. Improved merging — easily and reliably merge more of the information you find on Ancestry.com.

Family Tree Maker is a great program to help you organize your family history regardless of your level of expertise. With so many features and options, it’s perfect for the genealogist digging deeper into the past and the family historian fleshing out stories. Some of the additional features you may find helpful include:

1. Access interactive street and satellite maps: View important locations in your ancestors’ lives. Or create a migration map showing where events in ancestors’ lives took place.
2. Easily organize media: Add photos, documents, audio and video in one, easy-to-access location. Link media to multiple people in your tree and incorporate them into charts and reports.
3. Share your work with others
Use templates to create beautiful family trees or design your own with powerful charting tools. Enhance charts with backgrounds, embellishments and family photos.
4. Discover new family members — Follow hints from Ancestry.com, the world's largest family history resource.
5. Create Smart Stories — Transform facts from your tree into stories that update automatically as you change your tree.
6. Simplify source creation — Use templates to source everything from online databases to vital records.
7. Use standard location names — Use the locations database to enter place names consistently and in a standard format.
8. Explore data like never before — Use new and improved reports to gather information and export it in a variety of formats. Save settings in one report and apply them to others.
9. Navigate your tree with ease — View multiple generations, navigate to any individual in your tree with a click of the mouse and add or edit life events.
10. Import data from other genealogy programs — Open files created in Legacy™ Family Tree, The Master Genealogist™ and FamilySearch™ Personal Ancestral files.

Version 2014 is now available for pre-sale at 30% off for the early bird genealogist. You’ll have the option to have it shipped to you or download it the same day shipping begins. The pre-sale discount ends September 10th (today!), so get yours now to take advantage of the 2014 launch.

Family Tree Maker Site