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MoSGA Messenger, The Official Blog of the Missouri State Genealogical Association
Serving Missouri ancestor seekers since 7 November 2007

Tom Pearson, Editor

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Saturday, September 29, 2012

DOCUMENTING THE CIVIL WAR EXPERIENCE IN GEORGIA

The University of Georgia Libraries are partners in an effort to digitize more than 80,000 items that document Civil War events in Georgia, especially Sherman’s Georgia campaign and the blockade of the Georgia coast:

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GRAND CAMP CONFEDERATE VETERANS, DEPARTMENT OF VIRGINIA (1899-1924)

Proceedings of the Annual Meetings of the Grand Camp Confederate Veterans, Department of Virginia, by United Confederate Veterans Virginia Division (1899-1924):

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WITHOUT THEM THERE WOULD BE NO COUNTRY…

Histories of our American wars often focus on battles and generals—but without the foot soldiers, there would be no United States…

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NOT A PROSE MASTERPIECE, BUT IT DID THE JOB…

Lincoln could be an elegant prose stylist—when it was called for…

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Thursday, September 27, 2012

ANNOUNCING GENEABLOGGERS E-NEWS

News from Thomas MacEntee:

I’ve come to realize that folks in the genealogy community receive information via various “channels” and that not everyone is using social media. In addition, some people would rather receive an email alert periodically as to helpful genealogy news and information.

So I’m here to announce the new GeneaBloggers E-News! Sign up and you’ll receive periodic e-mail alerts filled with my latest finds. I know that there are many genealogy newsletters and e-news alerts out there, but you should know:

• GeneaBloggers E-News is not just for members of GeneaBloggers or for bloggers or “techies.” Everyone in the genealogy community will find something they can use to help with their own research.

• You can unsubscribe at any time. GeneaBloggers E-News will be using MailChimp and its strict procedures in building an e-mail list that conforms with standard blast e-mail practices.

• You won’t get bombarded with emails every day! There will be a regular monthly newsletter as well as periodic emails about time-sensitive offers and issues, such as saving public access to theGeorgia State Archives

. Please feel free to ask me any questions about the GeneaBloggers E-News by emailing me at geneabloggers@gmail.com.

Sign Up and You Could Win a $100 Amazon Gift Card

As a special incentive, I’m holding a contest to give away a $100 Amazon Gift Card if you sign up for GeneaBloggers E-News before October 1, 2012. All you have to do is visit http://bit.ly/geneabloggers-enews and sign up and stay signed up through October 1, 2012.

On Monday, October 1, 2012, I will draw one winner and electronically send them a $100 Amazon Gift Card. This contest is open to everyone and not limited to just United States residents. For complete rules please seeGeneaBloggers E-News Contest Rules.

Thomas MacEntee

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

SKETCHES OF VIRGINIA

Available full-text online: Sketches of Virginia: Historical and Biographical (2 series, originally published 1850, 1855, with annotations), by William Henry Foote:

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LOOKING BACK: THE CIVIL WAR IN TENNESSEE

The Tennessee State Library and Archives is actively seeking out items to digitize that pertain to Civil War events in the Volunteer State or to Tennessee veterans of that conflict:

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THE KATYN FOREST DECLASSIFIED

Thousands of Polish Army officers and intellectuals were murdered by the Soviet Army in the Katyn Forest in 1940. Newly declassified documents may reveal if the U.S. helped conceal the atrocity in order to protect its WWII alliance with the Soviet Union:

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KEEPING ITS OWN ALIVE

September is the U.S. Army’s Suicide Prevention Month, and not a moment too soon—August saw 38 suspected suicides, an all-time record for the armed service:

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Sunday, September 23, 2012

HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES, FROM THEIR FIRST SETTLEMENT AS COLONIES TO THE PEACE WITH MEXICO (1852)

Available full-text via Hathi Trust:

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THE FUTURE OF SMART SYSTEMS

What’s a smart system? It’s a (mostly) self-regulating house:

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THE ARMISTEAD FAMILY, 1635-1910

The Armistead Family, 1635-1910 (Richmond: Whittet and Shepperson, 1910), by Virginia Armistead Garber:

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LACKAWANNA NOT FOUND LACKING…

Students in a University of Scranton class on The Civil War and Reconstruction recently discovered 62 un-cataloged primary sources at the Lackawanna Historical Society that document some aspect of the Civil War in Pennsylvania. These items have now been digitized and are available for viewing:

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COMMONWEALTH RECORDS ABOUT THE NORTHERN TERRITORY

If you have relatives in Australia, or just an interest in Australian history and genealogy, this free online book by Ted Ling (2011) may prove of interest:

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Wednesday, September 19, 2012

THE BACKWASH OF WAR: THE HUMAN WRECKAGE OF THE BATTLEFIELD

The Backwash of War: The Human Wreckage of the Battlefield as Witnessed by an American Hospital Nurse (New York and London: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1916), by Ellen Newbold La Motte:

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A SIGN OF THE TIMES FROM GEORGIA

ATLANTA, GA -- Official statement:

"The Governor’s Office of Planning and Budget has instructed the Office of the Secretary of State to further reduce its budget for AFY13 and FY14 by 3% ($732,626). As it has been for the past two years, these cuts do not eliminate excess in the agency, but require the agency to further reduce services to the citizens of Georgia. As an agency that returns over three times what is appropriated back to the general fund, budget cuts present very challenging decisions. We have tried to protect the services that the agency provides in support of putting people to work, starting small businesses, and providing public safety.

To meet the required cuts, it is with great remorse that I have to announce, effective November 1, 2012, the Georgia State Archives located in Morrow, GA will be closed to the public. The decision to reduce public access to the historical records of this state was not arrived at without great consternation. To my knowledge, Georgia will be the only state in the country that will not have a central location in which the public can visit to research and review the historical records of their government and state. The staff that currently works to catalog, restore, and provide reference to the state of Georgia’s permanent historical records will be reduced. The employees that will be let go through this process are assets to the state of Georgia and will be missed. After November 1st, the public will only be allowed to access the building by appointment; however, the number of appointments could be limited based on the schedule of the remaining employees.

Since FY08, the Office of the Secretary of State has been required to absorb many budget reductions, often above the minimum, while being responsible for more work. I believe that transparency and open access to records are necessary for the public to educate themselves on the issues of our government. I will fight during this legislative session to have this cut restored so the people will have a place to meet, research, and review the historical records of Georgia."

Dusty Snipes Gres, Director
Ohoopee Regional Library System
610 Jackson Street
Vidalia, GA 30474
PH: 912.537.9283
FAX: 912.537.3735

EASTMAN ON WORLDCAT.ORG

Dick Eastman has put up an extremely helpful post on using WorldCat.org, and people who’ve attended one of my classes know what a big WorldCat.org booster I am:

“WorldCat is the world's largest network of library content and services. It is an online library catalog that lets you look up items in libraries around the world. The items available include books, electronic documents, journals, microform, and audio and video recordings.

Best of all, WorldCat is available to everyone free of charge. WorldCat libraries provide access to their catalogs on the Web, where most people start their search for information. By using the WorldCat.org catalog, you can search the collections of libraries in your community and thousands more around the world.

Please keep in mind that these are catalogs of available books, not the text of the books. WorldCat is useful in at least three situations:

1. You know which item you want, but you don't know which libraries have it
2. You want to know what items exist on a particular subject (or by a particular author)
3. You need more information about an item (for instance, to get information for a proper citation in your bibliography)

WorldCat identifies the book's title, author, publisher, and more and then shows the participating libraries where the book is available. “

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WWII DRAFT REGISTRATIONS ON FOLD3

"The first draft registration under the 1940 Selective Training and Service Act required all males ages 21-36 to register on October 16, 1940, to serve in what would ultimately be WWII. Between 1941 and 1943, there were five more registrations, and the ages changed to 18-44 (registrations from the "Old Man's Draft" are also on Fold3). Registration cards show name, residence, age, place of birth, employer, physical characteristics, and other information. Currently only the North Carolina registrations for younger men have been added to Fold3.com:"

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NEWS FROM LOHMAN, MISSOURI

Received from MoSGA member Darrell Jackson:

“On October 1 of this year, Darrell Jackson of Lohman, Missouri will begin a four year term as Director at Large on the Board of Directors of the National Genealogical Society. Darrell served as President of MoSGA from 2008 to 2010 and as 1st and 2nd Vice President prior to that. “

Congratulations, Darrell!

Sunday, September 16, 2012

KEEP RECIPES

Everybody’s got to eat—and most of us don’t want to eat the same old things all day every day. KeepRecipes can be your personalized online cookbook:

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MP3 TAG

Editing metadata for your MP3 collection made simple (and free):

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FAMILY HISTORY BOOKS

Dozens of Texas and Missouri local histories added to this site (along with hundreds of other items of possible interest):

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ROSTER OF THE TROUP ARTILLERY

Organized Athens, Georgia on 24 April 1861:

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GERMAN RESEARCH WITH DR. ROGER MINERT

Johnson County Genealogical Society 2012 Annual Seminar

Saturday October 27, 2012
8:15 a.m. to 4:00p.m.
The Ritz Charles Event Center
9000 West 137th Street, Overland Park, KS 66221
(913) 685-2600 ‎

Schedule:

8:15-9:00 Check-in, coffee and pastries, register for door prizes
9:00-9:15 Welcome and Introduction of speaker
9:15-10:15 Civil Records in Germany
10:15-10:45 Break, visit vendors

10:45-12:00 Communicating with Agencies and Individuals in Europe

12:00-1:00 Hot lunch is served! Choice of two entrees, green salad, starch, vegetable, fruit, dessert
1:00-1:15 Door prize drawings

1:15-2:25 Church Records in Germany
2:25-2:40 Break
2:40-2:55 Door prize drawings
2:55-4:00 Marriage and Courtship in Germany 1500 to 1800

Registration Fee:

$45 for members (late registration $55)
$55 for non-members (late registration $65)
Registrations must be postmarked no later than October 20 to avoid the late registration fee.

For further information contact our program chair, Lora Fitzgerald.

NARA-KC SECOND ANNUAL FALL GENEALOGY SYMPOSIUM

The National Archives at Kansas City will be offering, What is Old is New: Rediscovering Records for Genealogy Research, its second annual fall genealogy symposium on Saturday, October 6 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. The symposium features five different presentations: Introduction to Genealogy: Where to Begin with Archives Staff Member, Jennifer Audsley-Moore; Googling Your Genealogy and Navigating Ancestry.com with Archives Staff Member, Jessica Edgar; Maneuvering the New Search on Fold3.com with Certified Genealogist, Evie Bresette; and Military Records Were Destroyed? What to do? Steps to Reconstructing Your Veteran’s File with Professional International Genealogist and Consultant, Kathleen Brandt.

Familiar resources once found only on microfilm are becoming widely available via a variety of websites. Genealogists should keep current on how to use and access these tools as this shift occurs. National Achives Staff and guest lecturers will offer workshops that reintroduce both new and long-time genealogists to resources. Learn new search techniques, understand information organization on popular websites, and re-examine resources in ways you may not have considered. Look for clues in records you may have missed years ago.

Participants are welcome to attend one or all of these free workshops held at 400 West Pershing Road, Kansas City, Missouri 64108. Seating is limited, reserve your space today by submitting your RSVP to 816-268-8000 or via email. Free WiFi access will be available to attendees.

Workshop Descriptions:

Introduction to Genealogy: Where to Begin?
9:00 – 10:00 a.m. with National Archives Staff Member, Jennifer Audsley Moore Interested in starting your family history research? Not sure where to begin? Come learn the basics of what you need in order to start, where you can find information, what resources are available to assist, and how original records help tell your family’s story.

Googling Your Genealogy
10:15 – 11:15 a.m. with National Archives Staff Member, Jessica Edgar Searching online can be a powerful tool for any researcher. Many historical documents and resources have been placed online, and one of the biggest challenges for genealogists is knowing how and where to start looking for them. Learn to harness the power of the internet through the use of simple tools and tricks for effectively finding websites and useful resources for genealogy research.

Navigating Ancestry.com
11:30 a.m. – 12: 30 p.m. with National Archives Staff Member, Jessica Edgar Subscription-based genealogy website, Ancestry.com, contains a wealth of information, but unless you understand the structure and depth of the website, your search results and success will be limited. Come learn about the different databases and effective search strategies to uncover more about your ancestors! Patrons are encouraged to bring WiFi enabled device to follow along in class.

Maneuvering the New Search on Fold3.com
12:45 – 1:45 p.m. with Certified Genealogist, Evie Bresette What's old is new again! Genealogy websites change their format from time to time to enhance search capabilities. Specializing in military records, Fold3.com recently unveiled a radically new search tool. New and experienced genealogists alike will benefit from learning how to utilize this resource effectively to find or rediscover your ancestors.

Military Records Were Destroyed? What to Do? Steps to Reconstructing Your Veteran’s File
2:00 – 3:00 p.m. with Professional International Genealogist and Consultant, Kathleen Brandt Between 16 to 18 million military service files, many from WWI and WWII, were destroyed by the 1973 fire at the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis, Missouri. However, this loss should not discourage researchers from uncovering an ancestor's military experience.

To make a reservation for these free events, please call 816-268-8000 or email us here.

The National Archives at Kansas City is one of 15 facilities nationwide where the public has access to Federal archival records. It is home to historical records dating from the 1820s to the 1990s created or received by Federal agencies in Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota. For more information, call 816-268-8000 or visit us here.

Thursday, September 13, 2012

MISSOURI VETERANS HOME INMATE REGISTERS

Registers of the Federal Soldiers Home at St. James, Missouri:

Volume 1 contains the original admission registers for 396 residents from June 25, 1897 through August 11, 1903. Information given in the register may include name, admission date and number, friends or near kin, service record, date and place of birth, age on admission, amount of pension, nature of disability, occupation, marital status, literacy, church and lodge memberships. Additional remarks may also include biographical data, limited family history, addresses of relatives, date of death, and place of burial. Additional volumes will be added to the collection as they become available.

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FRIENDSHIP IS FRIENDSHIP, BUT WAR IS HELL, MY FRIEND…

When a former West Point classmate asked William Tecumseh Sherman to help him get his slaves back, Sherman patiently explained to him why a man who had eagerly embraced the new Confederate constitution should not expect to benefit from the protections bestowed by the Constitution of the United States:

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A BRIEFE AND TRUE REPORT OF THE NEW FOUND LAND OF VIRGINIA

A Briefe and True Report of the New Found Land of Virginia (based on the 1590 edition), by Thomas Harriot, illustrated by Theodor de Bry:

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SOLDIERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION BURIED IN OHIO

Official Roster of the Soldiers of the American Revolution Buried in Ohio (1929):

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ARCHON

Illinois Secretary of State and State Archivist Jesse White (D) has announced that a new online database describing the documents and records maintained at the Illinois State Archives is now available.

The database, called Archon, is a searchable finding aid for use in locating important historical information.

“As state archivist, it is my mission to make Illinois records available and as easily accessible as possible,” White said. “With the use of the Internet, individuals can easily search for records held at the Illinois State Archives. I am proud to make these important historical documents easily accessible with the use of this advanced technology.”

Archon is an open source archival management system that was developed by archivists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and is now used in more than 50 institutions across the country. It provides both a way for staff to record descriptive information about collections and a means for the public to view, search and browse that information in a fully-functional website.

Archon’s public interface shows the most current information that is available to researchers because it is updated automatically once records are received by the Archives. Once information has been entered, it is instantly accessible, searchable and browseable. The new electronic database can be found here.

This new electronic database replaces a printed guide called “Descriptive Inventory of the Archives of the State of Illinois.”

Wednesday, September 12, 2012

NARA-KC SEPTEMBER GENEALOGY WORKSHOP

The National Archives at Kansas City will offer the following free genealogy workshop, Order in the Court: Finding Your Family in Federal Court Records, on Friday, September 14, 2012 from 1:00 p.m.-2:30 p.m. The workshop will be held at 400 West Pershing Road, Kansas City, Missouri 64108.

Workshop Description:
Order in the Court: Finding Your Family in Federal Court Records
Friday, September 14, 2012 from 1:00 p.m.-2:30 p.m

Did your ancestor file for bankruptcy? Get tied up in a federal civil suit? Were they a defendant in a criminal case? Federal court documents are an underutilized set of records that help provide a snapshot of an individual or family at a particular juncture in life. Depending upon the type of case, documents can include lists of property, family members, testimony, and other insightful glimpses at events that may not be documented elsewhere. Come learn about the types of cases you can find at the National Archives and how to begin your research.

To make a reservation for this free workshop, please call 816-268-8000 or email kansascity.archives@nara.gov.

The National Archives at Kansas City is one of 15 facilities nationwide where the public has access to Federal archival records. It is home to historical records dating from the 1820s to the 1990s created or received by Federal agencies in Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota. For more information, call 816-268-8000 or visit us here.

Tuesday, September 11, 2012

eBOOKSREAD

What is eBooksRead.com? It’s a source for hundreds of thousands of free ebooks, searchable by author or title:

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THE MOST SECRET WAR

The Most Secret War: Army Signals Intelligence in Vietnam (Fort Belvoir, VA: Military History Office, US Army Intelligence and Security Command, 2003), by James L. Gilbert:

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FIRST RECORD BOOK OF THE "OLD DUTCH CHURCH OF SLEEPY HOLLOW"

First Record Book of the "Old Dutch Church of Sleepy Hollow", Organized in 1697 and Now the First Reformed Church of Tarrytown, N.Y. (Yonkers, NY: Yonkers Historical and Library Association, 1901), by First Reformed Church of Tarrytown, N.Y., ed. by David Cole:

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HISTORY OF ADDISON COUNTY, VERMONT

History of Addison County, Vermont; With Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of Some of Its Prominent Men and Pioneers (Syracuse, NY: D. Mason and Co., 1886), ed. by H. P. Smith:

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Monday, September 10, 2012

TABLET BUYING GUIDE

Looking to buy a tablet? Kim Komando’s Tablet Buying Guide will help you make an informed decision:

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THE DADS ARMY

80,000 men served in the Durham Home Guards, a militia unit that protected England’s County Durham during the Second World War (1939-1945). The records of this so-called Dads Army (most of the Home Guards were men too old to be drafted) are housed at the National Archives (UK):

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ST. LOUIS AREA CIVIL WAR DIGITIZATION PROJECT

Twenty-five institutions contributed documents for digitization that illustrate Civil War events in the St. Louis area:

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CIVIL WAR DOCUMENTS PROJECT AT SEMO

They’re ready to begin the digitization part of this promising project:

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HISTORIC CEMETERIES OF ILLINOIS

The Madison County Genealogical Society will host Dawn Cobb, Human Skeletal Remains Protection Act Coordinator from the Illinois Historic Preservation Agency, and Hall Hasson, an archaeologist with the state's Department of Natural Resources, at its monthly meeting at 7 p.m., Sept. 13, at the Edwardsville Public Library's Community Room, 112 S. Kansas St., Edwardsville, IL 62025. The pair will give a presentation on the state's historic cemeteries and laws that protect burial grounds. Call (618) 656-2299 or write the society at P.O. Box 631, Edwardsville, IL 62025.

Saturday, September 08, 2012

RECORD OF THE CONFEDERATE SAILOR (1925)

Record of the Confederate Sailor (vol. 1 no. 1— January 1925)--apparently only one issue was ever published:

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BLACK TEXAS CONFEDERATES

A Texas graduate student claims he has “documented with 100% irrefutable primary sources” the service of black Texans "who served in the Confederate Army." As is the norm with claims of this sort, he’s counting slaves forced to serve as teamsters, laborers, and personal servants as men “who served in the Confederate Army”:

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Note: This graduate student also counted as “primary sources” historical markers erected by various Texas county historical societies during the 1960s. Is anyone else troubled by the fact that a graduate student in a history program thinks that such markers are primary sources?

1862 HOMESTEAD ACT: BLESSING OR BANE?

Providing settlers with the opportunity to “purchase” 160 acres of land with sweat equity alone was obviously a blessing for millions of Americans—but what about ex-Confederates, who were barred by statute from making Homestead Land claims, or American Indians, whose (often illegally acquired) land was being given away to the invaders from the East:

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SUCCESS WAS NOT AN OPTION…

This Maryland community college professor thinks that General George McClellan was “set up” by Radical Republicans anxious to prevent a popular general of the Democratic persuasion from becoming president in 1864:

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BEST FREE WINDOWS APPS

This list has been recently updated by the friendly folks at Gizmo’s Freeware:

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EASTMAN ON THE NEW KINDLE FIRE TABLETS

Dick explains why Amazon is practically giving these techno marvels away:

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CARNAHAN ANNOUNCES GRANTS AVAILABLE FOR PRESERVATION OF MISSOURI HISTORY

JEFFERSON CITY, MO - Secretary of State Robin Carnahan announced today that the Missouri State Archives will make $61,576 available for historical records preservation and access projects throughout the state. The funding, which will be awarded to local institutions through a competitive grant process, is part of a $70,000 grant awarded to the Missouri State Archives by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC).

In 2010, the Missouri Historical Records Grant Program (MHRGP) awarded funding to a variety of institutions across the state, including local historical societies, public universities, city governments and regional museums. These grants helped to preserve many unique collections, including an assortment of rare architectural drawings from the St. Joseph area, records documenting the early history of the City of Columbia, historical correspondence from Taney County, and rare photographs from the National Churchill Museum in Fulton.

All of the state's public and private records repositories that care for documents of significant historical value are eligible for the MHRGP. This includes historical, ethnic, and religious societies; museums; libraries; colleges and universities; and local government entities. MHRGP funds may be used for projects that preserve and provide access to historical records, including hiring consultants, purchasing archival supplies and equipment, surveying and describing collections, and utilizing conservation services.

The MHRGP is administered by the State Archives on behalf of the Missouri Historical Records Advisory Board (MHRAB). The MHRAB is the central advisory board for projects relating to historic records that are developed and carried out within Missouri. The secretary of state serves as state coordinator and chairs the board, with the assistance of the state archivist, who serves as deputy coordinator. Since creating the MHRGP, the MHRAB has provided over $673,000 to Missouri's historical records repositories. This year, the MHRAB is encouraging applicants to submit grant proposals related to traditionally under documented collections, including: vanishing Missouri businesses and institutions, post-World War II immigrant communities, and small and non-affiliated religious organizations.

Applications are due November 1, 2012. To learn more about the MHRGP and download an application, please visit www.sos.mo.gov/archives/mhrab/guidelines.asp. For additional information, contact Shelly Croteau at (573) 751-4303 or mhrgp@sos.mo.gov.

Thursday, September 06, 2012

FAMILY HISTORY FAIR AT JEFFERSON COUNTY LIBRARY

Jefferson County Genealogical Society and the Jefferson County Library, Northwest Branch will host a Family History Fair on Saturday October 20 from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. The event will be held at the Library, located at 5680 State Road PP, High Ridge, Missouri. This is a great opportunity to learn how you can start your family history project or get great tips on advancing your research!

Presentations will be given throughout the day. Attendees can choose between “Basic Genealogy for Beginners” or “St. Louis: Cradle of the Czech Catholic Experience in America” from 10-11a.m.; followed by “Finding Your German Roots” or “Finding Genealogical Clues in Probate Records & Wills” from 11:30 -12:30 p.m.

Afternoon programs include: “The Special Collection at the Northwest Branch of the Jefferson County Library: More Than Just Local History” from 1:00 -2:00 p.m.; and National Personnel Records Center from 2:30 -3:30 p.m.

Several genealogical and historical organizations will be present to talk with and answer questions, plus the Library will offer free access to its online genealogy databases Ancestry, Heritage Quest and Fold3. This will be a perfect time to locate yourself or your parents in the 1940 Federal Census. Volunteers will be available for assistance.

There will also be door prizes and a grand prize, a $20 gift certificate to Applebees.

Lunches can be purchased in the library café.

The program is free and open to anyone interested in family history. Registration is not required. For more information, contact Christine Merseal or Mindy Hudson at 636-677-8186.

Wednesday, September 05, 2012

RESEARCHING THE MIDWEST AND BEYOND

Date: 14-15 Sept 2012
Place: Howard Johnson Hotel, Springfield, MO
Cost: $45 (members); $50 (non-members)
Keynoter: Paula Stuart-Warren

Fri, Sept 14, 7 PM—8:30 PM—Friday Evening Session with Ms. Stuart-Warren

Major Midwest Archives and Their Records

Saturday, Sept 15, 8 AM-9 PM—Mini-Sessions (pick one)

Beginning Genealogy
Footprints in Time

Saturday, Sept 15, 11 AM-Noon—Mid-Morning Sessions (pick one)

Read Between the Lines
Google and Your Genealogy

Sat, Sept 15, 9 AM—4 PM—Talks by Ms. Stuart-Warren

New Englanders in the Midwest
A World of Records: Using the Family History Library and Family History Center
Where Are Those Records They Told Me to Check?

For more info, or to register online: http://www.ozarksgs.org/
Email: conference@ozarksgs.org

THE PRICE OF FREEDOM: AMERICANS AT WAR

Online exhibit on the website of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History:

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WALL TO WALL GETTYSBURG

If you’re a Civil War nut, one of these free Gettysburg wallpapers is just what your desktop or laptop needs:

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EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION ON DISPLAY

Emancipation Proclamation
On display September 5, 2012 through January 21, 2013

One hundred fifty years ago, on September 22, 1862, buoyed by the recent Union victory at the Battle of Antietam, President Abraham Lincoln announced his intention to issue an Emancipation Proclamation, which he did on New Year’s Day 1863. To commemorate this momentous anniversary, the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum is putting its signed copy of the Emancipation Proclamation, plus two new artifacts, on display in the Museum’s Treasures Gallery starting Wednesday, September 5. The items will remain on display through January 21, 2013.

“Every year in our country, the legal and social equality of all races continues to come closer to our ideal,” said James M. Cornelius, curator of the Lincoln Collection at the Presidential Library and Museum. “The great break with the past, the seminal event, the leap forward, began with Lincoln's pen in September 1862. People at the time - black or white, American or European, North or South - knew this, and their experience tells us to celebrate this document and its anniversary.”

The Emancipation Proclamation is one of the officially printed commemorative copies that Lincoln signed in full, along with Secretary of State William Seward and Lincoln’s private secretary, John G. Nicolay. The President signed the original Emancipation Proclamation in private with only a few witnesses at his side--no photo opportunity, as we like to say today.

It is fortunate that the commemorative printing was ordered, because Lincoln’s original manuscript was lost in the Chicago Fire of 1871. The Proclamation measures approximately 27 by 20 inches. It was most recently displayed during a five-day special viewing around his birthday in 2012, and during the 2009 Lincoln Bicentennial.

Next to it will be two artifacts never before displayed. One, created in the 1870s, is a bronze statue of Lincoln breaking the shackles of a slave. The sculptor was probably a Frenchman, Léon Falconnier. It was inspired by a giant Washington, D.C., statue by Thomas Ball for which Frederick Douglass gave the dedication speech in 1876. Falconnier may have wanted to capitalize on Ball's work, which, though less popular today, was commissioned and paid for by freedmen and helped solidify the image of Lincoln as the liberator of a race. Lincoln in fact had urged freedmen to show their gratitude to God and not to him, since freedom is a human right.

Visitors will be asked to give their thoughts about the sculpture as part of an interactive experience about this trio of historic objects.

The other item on view for the first time will be an 1864 notice of a slave sale in Louisville, Kentucky. This sale, held nearly two years after the Emancipation Proclamation was issued, shows that the Proclamation did not apply to the border states during the Civil War, thus keeping these slave-holding states in the Union. The next year, Lincoln and Congress voted to change the U.S. Constitution with the 13th Amendment, which outlawed slavery in the entire United States.

Tuesday, September 04, 2012

ARIZONA STATE AGENCIES ARCHIVES COLLECTION

This collection consists of content collected from the websites of Arizona state government agencies, boards, and commissions:

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MISSOURI HISTORY MUSEUM UPDATE

The following sources have recently been added to the Missouri History Museum's Genealogy and Local History Index. To search the index globally, visit the main page. To browse or search one of the individual sources below, click on the link for that source.

To receive monthly updates of new indexes added to the Genealogy and Local History Index, sign up to receive the monthly e-newsletter "Genealogy and House History News." To sign up, send an email to dpn@mohistory.org with the word "subscribe" in the subject line of your email and your name in the body of the email.

1. Grand Army of the Republic scrapbook, circa 1925-1943

2. St. Louis Junior League Follies program, 1936

3. Celebration Publication Upon the Occasion of the 50th Anniversary of the St. Louis Supporting Society for Schwabians, 1931

4. Historical Pageant, Golden Jubilee, 1875-1925, Concordia Turnverein

5. Union Electric Company employee magazines, 1913-1969

6. The Pet Milk Magazine (1952-1967) and Profile (1966-1967)

7. Souvenir Program of the 21st Anniversary "Y" Circus, May 6-7, 1955

8. 25th Anniversary, Progress Club, International Shoe Company, 1917-1942

9. Roster of Occidental Lodge No. 163, A.F. & A.M. (1903)

10. Manual of the First Presbyterian Church, St. Louis, 1888

11. Roster, Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry, Valley of St. Louis (1946)

Dennis Northcott
Associate Archivist for Reference
Missouri History Museum Library and Research Center
225 South Skinker Blvd, across from Forest Park
Tel: 314.746.4517 | Fax: 314.746.4548

THUNDER

Thunder is a free screen reader application for blind and visually impaired computer users. It can enlarge text and icons for the visually impaired, or tell blind users what’s on their computer screens:

LINK

SOFTWARE ALTERNATIVES

If it’s time to buy software, it’s possible that a free application will work just as well for you:

LINK

Saturday, September 01, 2012

UNDERSTANDING VIETNAM

Understanding the Vietnam War, and learning lessons from it that can be applied to other conflicts in other parts of the globe, must necessarily involve gaining an understanding of the motivations, internal dynamics, and foreign relations of our enemy in that conflict:

LINK

NARA-KC SEPTEMBER GENEALOGY WORKSHOP

The National Archives at Kansas City will offer the following free genealogy workshop on Saturday, September 8, 2012 from 10:00 a.m.-11:30 a.m. The workshop will be held at 400 West Pershing Road, Kansas City, Missouri 64108.

Workshop Description:

Township, Section Range: Looking at Land Records
Saturday, September 8, 2012 from 10:00 a.m.-11:30 a.m.

Township 1, Range 43 West, Section 2. Does this make sense to you? Have you always been curious about the “secret language” of land records? Come learn about Federal land records and the difference between what you will discover at the National Archives versus the county or state archives. Topics include locating information about bounty land warrants, homestead files, land tract books, and other great land resources.

To make a reservation for this free workshop, please call 816-268-8000 or email kansascity.archives@nara.gov.

The National Archives at Kansas City is one of 15 facilities nationwide where the public has access to Federal archival records. It is home to historical records dating from the 1820s to the 1990s created or received by Federal agencies in Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota.

ANCESTRY.COM FREE CENSUS SEARCHING

Good morning,

We are still excited about the 1940 US Census here at Ancestry.com. As you all know, the 1940 Census is available for free on Ancestry.com through 2013, but we wanted to share our excitement even more. We will be opening up 25 more databases from today through September 3rd to allow everyone access to Ancestry’s 713 million U.S. Federal Census Records. Below you’ll see a list of the 25 databases that are now searchable for free at Ancestry.com/census.

• 1790-1940 United States Federal Census collections
• 1850 U.S. Federal Census – Slave Schedules
• 1860 U.S. Federal Census – Slave Schedules
• 1890 Veterans Schedules
• Non-Population Schedules 1850-1880
• U.S. Enumeration District Maps and Descriptions, 1940
• U.S. Federal Census – 1880 Schedules of Defective, Dependent, and Delinquent Classes
• U.S. Federal Census Mortality Schedules, 1850-1885
• U.S. IRS Tax Assessment Lists, 1862-1918
• U.S., Indian Census Rolls, 1885-1940

Part of our celebration includes what we are calling The Ancestry.com Time Machine. This interactive experience allows you to see what a typical day would be like back in 1940. You can customize the experience by inputting a few of your interests, and it will create a video of what you may have experienced back in 1940. You can then share that video with your friends and family.

Let me know if you have any questions,

Matthew Deighton
Specialist, Public Relations
Ancestry.com

THE LONG TERM FUTURE OF YOUR GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY

Is your genealogical society struggling—membership down, attendance at monthly meetings sagging? It’s probably time to shake things up a bit:

LINK

DAVID RUMSEY MAP COLLECTION

The David Rumsey Map Collection is one of the world's most comprehensive caches of rare and historic maps. There are more than 150,000 maps in the collection, some dating as early as 1700.

There are 33,000 digitized maps available to view at the David Rumsey Map Collection online. You can view them side-by-side in high resolution, or see them using Google Earth, Google Maps, Second Life and other online viewing tools:

LINK

BE A GOOGLE POWER SEARCHER

The Google Gang will teach you how to be a Google Power Searcher—for free:

LINK