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Wednesday, August 29, 2012

MAGIC CATALOG

29,000 Project Gutenberg free e-books available in Kindle-compatible formats:

LINK

WADE HALL & GREG SWEMM AMERICAN QUILTS COLLECTION

Online exhibit highlighting materials from the University of Alabama Libraries Collection:

LINK

THERE ARE NO UNWOUNDED SOLDIERS

Soldiers from the very beginning have paid a psychological price for doing what they do and seeing what they see: for some of them, the price is too high:

LINK

FGS ANNOUNCES NEW WEBSITE

For Immediate Release
August 29, 2012

More Than a New Look . . . An Engaging New Site for FGS Members and the Genealogy Community

August 29, 2012 – Austin, TX. The Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) announces the debut of its newly revamped website to better serve FGS member societies and the genealogical community. The new site is ready in time for the upcoming FGS 2012 Conference in Birmingham, Alabama August 29 – September 1, 2012.

Based on the EasyNetSites platform, the new website ensures that FGS will be able to deliver timely and relevant content to its FGS member society leaders related to society management and trends in the genealogy industry.

Features include:

• Content organized based upon the FGS tagline “Learn, Connect, Succeed.”
• Members-Only content including back issues of FGS FORUM and Discussion Boards for genealogy society leaders to ask questions and exchange ideas about a variety of society management issues.
• Access various members-only review programs to review society by-laws, websites and newsletters.
• Free downloads including the FGS Voice archives as well as the Society Strategy Papers in PDF format.

In addition, FGS will implement a new on-line voting system later this year via its new website for the FGS Annual Elections.

FGS President Pat Oxley, in reviewing the improvements and added features, states: “There is an emphasis on providing more features for our members in the Members-Only Area. This includes the ability to submit events to the FGS Events Calendar and using the new Discussion Boards to exchange ideas on how to improve genealogy societies. I know that our members will be happy with not only the new layout and organization of the site, but the access to content and programs that FGS has always been known for in relation to genealogy society management.”

FGS members and the public are encouraged to visit and explore the new FGS website.

About the Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS)

The Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) was founded in 1976 and represents the members of hundreds of genealogical societies. FGS links the genealogical community by helping genealogical societies strengthen and grow through resources available online, FGS Forum magazine (filled with articles pertaining to society management and genealogical news), and Society Strategy Series papers, covering topics about effectively operating a genealogical society. FGS also links the genealogical community through its annual conference -- four days of excellent lectures, including one full day devoted to society management topics. To learn more visit http://www.fgs.org.

Contact:

Federation of Genealogical Societies
PO Box 200940
Austin, TX 78720-0940
phone: +1 (888) 347-1500
fax: +1 (866) 347-1350
office@fgs.org

Sunday, August 26, 2012

THE C.S.S. ALABAMA DIGITAL COLLECTION

Digital versions of documents and images associated with the C.S.S. raiding ship Alabama:

LINK

GOGS FALL GENEALOGY WORKSHOP

Greater Omaha Genealogical Society is sponsoring a Fall 2012 Workshop. Keynoter is John P. Colletta, Ph.D.

Place: Nebraska Methodist College, N. 87th & Burt Streets, Omaha, NB
Date: Saturday, 27 October 2012
Time: 9 AM-4:30 PM

Registration before September 28th gets an Early Bird Discount. For registration details, call 402-397-6555 or email them here.

Classes:

9:15-10:15—Immigration to America, Colonial Times to Post-World War II: Where Do Your Ancestors Fit In?

10:45-11:45—Passenger Arrival Records, Colonial Times to Mid-20th Century

12:00-1:15—Lunch break (Sandwich and a side, $4.00, with additional sides, snacks, and soft drinks available, or numerous restaurants nearby)

1:30-2:30—Naturalization Records, Colonial Times to Mid-20th Century

3:00-4:00—Turning Biographical Facts into Real Life Events: How to Build Historical Context

Between classes, registrants can ask Dr. Colletta questions, visit the Book Room or Bake Sale, or enter various raffle drawings.

BYLAWS WORKBOOK: A HANDBOOK FOR NEW & ESTABLISHED SOCIETIES, 2ND EDITION

August 22, 2012 – Austin, TX. The Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) announces the publication of the second edition of Bylaws Workbook: A Handbook for New & Established Societies, compiled by Marcia S. Lindley and revised by Roberta “Bobbi” King.

This workbook is designed to help societies create successful bylaws that prevent confusion, dissension, and disagreement. Whether large or small, new or established, societies can use this guide in planning, drafting, and implementing bylaws that guarantee a smooth-running organization. Whether a society realizes it or not, the most important document for its members is the bylaws. It is the only document that tells the members how the society is supposed to function.

The authors draw from their extensive experience in bylaws reviews and revisions to provide step-by-step guidance on all aspects of bylaws development, including detailed examples. They show genealogical societies as well as historical societies and family associations how to:

• Construct a solid bylaws plan
• Select the most appropriate bylaws language and format
• Utilize new technology for voting and board meetings
• Develop policy and procedure manuals
• Handle disciplinary actions quickly and competently
• Research considerations for incorporating

The book is available for purchase at Amazon.com ($4.99 + s/h). Copies of the book will be on display at the upcoming FGS 2012 Conference, Indians, Squatters, Settlers and Soldiers in the "Old Southwest" – to be held in Birmingham, Alabama 29 August to 1 September, 2012. Learn more at http://www.fgs.org.

About the Authors

Marcia S. Lindley, an active member of the Arizona State Genealogical Society, has served a variety of positions including president, vice president, director and member of the Editorial Board. She was responsible for leading a group of society members in an extensive review of their bylaws. She is a staff attorney with the Court of Appeals of the State of Arizona and holds degrees in history and law.

Roberta "Bobbi" King was for several years a member of the FGS board of directors as well as serving as Vice-President of Administration and parliamentarian. King is a member of the bylaws committee and the bylaws review committee, for which she has reviewed dozens of society bylaws. She is associated with several Colorado genealogical societies, as well as a member of the National Genealogical Society and the Association of Professional Genealogists. She was recipient of the APGQ Award of Excellence in 2008.

About the Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS)

The Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) was founded in 1976 and represents the members of hundreds of genealogical societies. FGS links the genealogical community by helping genealogical societies strengthen and grow through resources available online, FGS Forum magazine (filled with articles pertaining to society management and genealogical news), and Society Strategy Series papers, covering topics about effectively operating a genealogical society. FGS also links the genealogical community through its annual conference -- four days of excellent lectures, including one full day devoted to society management topics. To learn more visit http://www.fgs.org.

STLGS NEWS FLASH

St. Louis Genealogical Society has an official blog (as of 7 June 2012):

LINK

You can send them news of interest to StLGS members at publications@stlgs.org.

Friday, August 24, 2012

LEARNING TO LOVE MICROSOFT

Yes, they’re a giant corporation, and yes, they would really like to sell you stuff, but they also provide a lot of (fairly useful) free stuff:

LINK

ENSLAVING THE FREE

This case concerning a Union Army colonel’s free servant who was captured by the Confederate Army and sold into slavery became a cause celebre in the North:

LINK

SAM BASS, THE TRAIN ROBBER (1944)

Available full-text online: Sam Bass, the Train Robber: The Life of Texas' Most Popular Bandit (published under "Harvey N. Castleman" pseudonym; Girard, KS: Haldeman-Julius Publications, c1944), by Vance Randolph:

LINK

TABBLES

You can “tag” music files with info like artist, album, composer, date, and genre. Why can’t you tag other types of files? Well, now you can!

Tabbles is a free download that tags files according to category, group, date – you name it. Every file can have multiple categories and tags.

This means, of course, that you will see the same document listed in multiple groups even though you have only one copy of that document on your hard drive. You can even share your "tabbles" online and over networks—did I mention that this is a free download?

Take a look:

LINK

Tuesday, August 21, 2012

THE HUNT FOR A HERO

Witold Pilecki was a genuine Polish hero: he volunteered to be sent to Auschwitz so that he could chronicle conditions there, managed to escape, and fought with the Polish underground until he was recaptured. He somehow managed to survive the war, but resisted the Soviet occupation and was arrested, killed, and buried in an unmarked grave by order of Josef Stalin. Now the hunt is on for Pilecki’s final resting place, so that he can be given the honors due to a Polish patriot:

LINK

LEGIONS OF ROME: THE DEFINITIVE HISTORY

The title is no exaggeration: if you are interested in the Roman Army (or know somebody who is), you are going to NEED this book:

LINK

JEFFERSON COUNTY LIBRARY PLACES HISTORICAL PHOTOGRAPHS ONLINE

The Jefferson County Library seeks to spark interest in Jefferson County history by sharing its historical photographs on Flickr, a popular photo-sharing service. The wide range of photographs offer a compelling look at how county residents lived and worked in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Currently, the collection features over 300 photographs. They are arranged in sixty-eight sets. The images showcase the rich legacy of Jefferson County towns, schools, churches, organizations, and agricultural heritage.

“People enjoy viewing historical photos of their home town,” explained Christine Merseal, Genealogy Library Specialist of the Northwest Branch, who went on to say ”Individuals have donated these photographs over the years to the library. Local historian, Della Lang, has been a major contributor. She has donated wonderful images of the past. The library has also obtained photos from patrons who have one or two pictures of their ancestor in front of a one-room school house or a photograph of their family farm.”

The Special Collection at the Northwest Branch is seeking additional photographs to add to their online collection, on Flickr. A signed release of any photograph donated is required. Please contact Christine Merseal here or at 636-677-8186.

Currently, the Jefferson County Historical Photo Collection can be found here and also linked to the Jefferson County Library website.

Christine Merseal, CG
Library Specialist I --- Genealogy
Jefferson County Library
5680 State Rd. PP
High Ridge, MO 63049

Certified Genealogist and CG are proprietary service marks of the Board for Certification of Genealogists used by the Board to identify its program of genealogical competency evaluation and used under license by the Board's associates.

Saturday, August 18, 2012

FREE KINDLE BOOKS ORG

Just what it says: a list of thousands of e-books available for free via Project Gutenberg (most classics/public domain, but much of it really great stuff). Clicking on an author takes you to a list of his/her titles available via Project Gutenberg—then click on a title, and you can immediately download a copy without switching to the Project Gutenberg site!

LINK

ILLINOIS BLOG

If you live in Illinois, were born there, or visit there often, the Illinois Blog will be of special interest—it highlights places to go and things to do in the Land of Lincoln:

LINK

U.S. NAVY’S FACEBOOK BICENTENNIAL PAGE

The U.S. Navy is using this page to promote its ongoing efforts to observe the bicentennial of America’s participation in the War of 1812:

LINK

NARA-KC AUGUST GENEALOGY WORKSHOP

The National Archives at Kansas City will offer the following genealogy workshop, Counting Everyone: Using Federal Census Records to Find Your Ancestors, on Wednesday, August 22 from 1:00 – 2:30 p.m. The workshop will be held at 400 West Pershing Road, Kansas City, Missouri 64108.

Workshop Description:

Counting Everyone: Using Federal Census Records to Find Your Ancestors
Wednesday, August 22, 1:00 – 2:30 p.m.

Everyone counts! The census documents people from all walks of life: immigrants and store clerks to celebrities, inmates, and everyday people. This course will introduce beginning genealogists to the United States Federal Census while providing direction on how and where to start researching your family history. Learn to discover clues, codes, and other telling details about your ancestors’ lives!

To make a reservation for this free workshop, please call 816-268-8000 or email us here.

The National Archives at Kansas City is one of 15 facilities nationwide where the public has access to Federal archival records. It is home to historical records dating from the 1820s to the 1990s created or received by Federal agencies in Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota. For more information, call 816-268-8000 or visit our website.

FAMILY TREE MAKER ANNOUNCEMENT

Good afternoon,

Ancestry.com normally announces the newest version of Family tree Maker around this time of the year. Instead we have decided to make several key updates to the existing software, and give those updates away for free. We will be working hard this year to improve the current product and you will see these bonus features throughout the year.

Remember, you will need to upgrade to Family Tree Maker 2012 (if you have not already done so) before you can download the bonus features.

Since Family Tree Maker 2012 was released last fall, a number of updates have been sent out that include improvements and new features. Here’s a list of just some of these great changes:

• Numerous enhancements to TreeSync so syncing your tree to Ancestry.com is faster and more reliable
• A new Family View Report that displays a person’s ancestors, spouse, and children together (similar to the Family View in the People workspace)
• A new Undocumented Facts Report that lists people’s facts that have no source documentation
• The ability to merge info from multiple versions of the same fact
• New source templates for the 1940 U.S. census and improved support for city directories
• Dozens of report enhancements including performance improvements and new options in the relationship chart, family group sheet, Individual Report, Notes Report, Data Errors Report, Outline Descendant Report, Media Item Report, photo albums, Media Usage Report, Documented Facts Report, and calendar

And there are more enhancements to come in the next bonus update—so stayed tuned.

Thank you,

Matthew Deighton, PR Specialist
Ancestry.com

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

TEXAS STATE LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES ONLINE COLLECTIONS

Coverage includes Adjutant General Records; CCC construction and park development drawings; Confederate Pension Applications; Historical Maps; and Republic of Texas Claims and Passports:

LINK

EARLY CHRISTIAN WRITINGS

If you’ve got any interest in early Christian writings, this site will definitely be of interest:

LINK

JAMES BUCHANAN EADS

The more you learn about this guy, the more impressed you are by his amazing inventions—and the Missouri History Museum has a most impressive Eads Manuscript Collection:

LINK

PRIMARY SOURCES ONLINE

From a website likely to be of interest to most readers of this blog:

“Primary sources are original records created at the time historical events occurred (or in the lifetime of those present in the form of memoirs and oral histories). Primary sources may include letters, manuscripts, diaries, journals, newspapers, speeches, interviews, memoirs, documents produced by government agencies, photographs, audio recordings, moving pictures or video recordings, and objects or artifacts such as works of art or ancient roads, buildings, tools, and weapons. These sources serve as the raw material to interpret the past.

This site is an attempt to bring together SOME of the best of these sites. I have attempted to arrange the sites geographically by the area covered.

It is virtually impossible to list all primary sources available online. This list can only scratch the surface. I have included mega-collections of sites where you will find many more sources than the few samples I mention.

Most of these primary sources are offered free to the public by government agencies, educational institutions, and non-profit organizations.

The links on this site were originally compiled for a genealogy program at Daniel Boone Regional Library by staff member Carolyn Paul Branch.”

LINK

Monday, August 13, 2012

WASHINGTON STATE DIGITAL ARCHIVES

They’re digitizing their resources at an astonishing pace:

LINK

There’s a special section on digitized genealogical resources:

LINK

And a section on digitized newspaper resources (various papers and time periods covered):

LINK

Also worth a look is the Online Presentations section, especially the Historical Maps and Remembering WWI Soldiers presentations:

LINK

SYSTEM OF RECRUITING

How did they recruit volunteers for the Army during the Civil War? One way was to run ads in the newspaper, like the following ad that ran in the Covington, KY newspaper during 1862:

LINK

HENRY WAGER HALLECK

His fellow officers called him “Old Brains”—partly because he was so obviously intelligent, and partly because he started going bald early on, and thereafter seemed to be all forehead. He was a gifted planner and administrator, but had little talent for field command. His Civil War boss, Abraham Lincoln, called him “little more than a first rate clerk”:

LINK

WHAT MAKES A BOOK A BOOK?

If you grew up reading (and loving) print books, the advent of e-book readers leaves you with mixed feelings. E-books are undeniably convenient: I’ve got several hundred on my Kindle at this point, and it’s certainly fantastic to be able to download an e-book in what seems like a second or so. Yet it’s hard to beat the feeling of sitting in the back yard on a sunny afternoon with a real book and a glass of iced tea, or snuggling up with a real book and a cup of Earl Grey (hot) on a winter’s evening:



LINK

Saturday, August 11, 2012

GUIDE TO CIVIL WAR MANUSCRIPTS IN THE MISSOURI HISTORY MUSEUM COLLECTION

Impressive guide created by my pal, Dennis Northcott:

LINK

WORLD WAR II AIRCRAFT TRIVIA

Did you know: during WWII, the U.S. lost 170 aircraft per day:

LINK

Another eye-opening fact: during 1942-1943, bomber crewmen in Europe had to complete 25 missions in order to be rotated home—but it was statistically impossible to do so

DISHONORING THE DEAD

Recently a person attempted to vandalize a monument in Boston that memorializes the Civil War sacrifices of the African American 54th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment. The vandal wasn’t a skinhead/white supremacist, however: the perp was a black woman:

LINK

OUTLOOK.COM

Microsoft is offering a brand-new free email service, and it looks to be real winner:

LINK

WHAT DO YOU LOVE?

New search option from the gang at Mountain View:

LINK

Tuesday, August 07, 2012

BATTLES OF NEW YORK: BATTLES AND RAIDS IN THE PROVINCE AND STATE OF NEW YORK, 1641-1809

Battles against American Indians and foreign powers during the time period specified:

LINK

1940 CENSUS NEWS

Index for 1940 census is now complete for all states:

LINK

CIVIL WAR'S MOST CHICKEN GENERAL

That’s the title of this very interesting article about General George B. McClellan. Chicken isn’t really the right word, however, to describe Little Mac, the man who would be Napoleon, because McClellan in fact was not a coward—he displayed great personal bravery on several occasions during the Mexican-American War. At the same time, however, neither bold nor decisive would accurately describe his tenure as commander of the Army of the Potomac:

LINK

NARA-KC GENEALOGY WORKSHOP

The National Archives at Kansas City will offer the following genealogy workshop, Introduction to Genealogy: Where to Begin?, on Thursday, August 9 from 10:00 – 11:30 a.m.. The workshop will be held at 400 West Pershing Road, Kansas City, Missouri 64108.

Workshop Description:

Introduction to Genealogy: Where to Begin?
Thursday, August 9, 10:00 – 11:30 a.m.

If you are interested in starting your family history research but aren’t sure where to begin, this course will teach you how to start. The course covers the basics of what you need, where you can find information, what resources are available to assist, and how original records help tell your family’s story.

To make a reservation for this free workshop, please call 816-268-8000 or email us here.

The National Archives at Kansas City is one of 15 facilities nationwide where the public has access to Federal archival records. It is home to historical records dating from the 1820s to the 1990s created or received by Federal agencies in Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota. For more information, call 816-268-8000 or visit our website.

Sunday, August 05, 2012

BUMBLING BURNSIDE?

It is easy to see why persons visiting the Fredericksburg battlefield might come away with the impression that Union Army commander Ambrose Burnside was a bumbler (or an idiot). But Lincoln didn’t give Burnside command of the Army of the Potomac after drawing his name out of a hat: Burnside had recently commanded an extremely successful military operation in North Carolina:

LINK

NOTE: In his defense, Burnside knew only too well that he was not cut out to be commander of a large army, and turned down the Army of the Potomac job on at least one occasion...

RARE BOOK SCHOOL

Summer school for rare book librarians and dealers:

LINK

COLLECTOR NOTEPAD

I know that you’re a collector. How do I know this? Well, you’re a genealogist—you collect dead relatives if nothing else. But odds are, you also collect something else: baseball cards; coins; stamps; Care Bears; potato chips shaped like Elvis—who knows? Now you can easily keep track of those “other collections” with a free, easy to use application, Collector Notepad:

LINK

IN THE KNOW

Are you on the NARA-KC mailing list? If the answer is “no,” then send an email to them with your U.S. postal mail information or your eddress, or call them at 816-268-8000.

By providing your contact info, you grant the National Archives at Kansas City permission to send you information about upcoming exhibitions, special events, and programs. Per the Privacy Act of 1974, they may not share your personal information with third parties.

SCHOOL HOUSE TO WHITE HOUSE

After attending public schools in Abilene, Kansas, Dwight D. Eisenhower entered the U.S. Military Academy in West Point, New York, beginning a long and distinguished military career. Later in life, Eisenhower remembered his family's emphasis on education: "From the beginning of our schooling, Mother and Father encouraged us [Eisenhower boys] to go to college. They said constantly, 'Anyone who really wants an education can get it.' But my father, remembering that he didn't become a farmer as his father had hoped, scrupulously refrained from suggesting courses of study." Eisenhower was a talented athlete in high school and at West Point before injuring his knee. "School House to White House" includes a photograph of Eisenhower on the Abilene High School football team.

To learn more about the presidents and view photographs and documents from their youth, visit School House to White House: The Education of the Presidents, on display through February 23, 2013.

The National Archives at Kansas City is one of 15 facilities nationwide where the public has access to Federal archival records. It is home to historical records dating from the 1820s to the 1990s created or received by Federal agencies in Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota. For more information, call 816-268-8000, email us here, visit our website, or find us on Facebook.

Thursday, August 02, 2012

BOYS OF SUMMER

The Boys of Summer: Baseball All-Stars in the Archives

Visitors to the National Archives at Kansas City can view a new special display of photographs and facsimile documents entitled The Boys of Summer: Baseball All-Stars in the Archives. The display is located in the main hallway on the concourse (lower) level near the School House to White House exhibition. During the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries, baseball was the most widely played sport in the United States and became known as “America’s game.” It is no surprise, then, to find records relating to the game itself and some of the game’s greatest players--Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, Jackie Robinson, Mickey Mantle, and more-- in the holdings of the National Archives. From military records to photographs with American Presidents to Federal court cases, the National Archives preserves forever the game of baseball and its star players’ interactions with the United States government. The display will be available for viewing throughout the baseball season.

LINK

NARA-KC GENEALOGY WORKSHOPS

The National Archives at Kansas City is offering several free genealogy workshops in August.

Workshop Descriptions:

Introduction to Genealogy: Where to Begin?
Thursday, August 9, 10:00 – 11:30 a.m.

If you are interested in starting your family history research but aren’t sure where to begin, this course will teach you how to start. The course covers the basics of what you need, where you can find information, what resources are available to assist, and how original records help tell your family’s story.

Counting Everyone: Using Federal Census Records to Find Your Ancestors
Wednesday, August 22, 1:00 – 2:30 p.m.

Everyone counts! The census documents people from all walks of life: immigrants and store clerks to celebrities, inmates, and everyday people. This course will introduce beginning genealogists to the United States Federal Census while providing direction on how and where to start researching your family history. Learn to discover clues, codes, and other telling details about your ancestors’ lives!

To make a reservation for these free workshops call 816-268-8000 or email us here.

MISSOURI HISTORY MUSEUM UPDATE

The following sources have recently been added to the Genealogy and Local History Index:

1. Grand Army of the Republic Scrapbook, circa 1925-1943

2. St. Louis Junior League Follies program, 1936

The following archival finding aids have been posted to the Archives Collection Guides page on their website:

Fant Family Papers, 1848-1910

Isaac B. Gildersleeve Papers, 1851-1865

Rev. Charles Peabody Papers, 1846-1889

Thomas K. Skinker Family Papers, 1839-1924

ASCEND TO THE CLOUD

No, this article isn’t about The Rapture, but you may start feeling a bit giddy as you learn about all the great choices available for safely storing your data in the Cloud:

LINK

SCCGS NEWS

St. Clair County Genealogical Society
PO Box 431
Belleville, Illinois 62222-0431
www.stclair-ilgs.org/stchome.htm

Please join us on Thursday, September 6, 2012. Alton, Illinois was one of Illinois' early military establishments due to its position along the Mississippi River. Beth Phillips, a St. Clair County, Illinois, native and librarian at Hayner Genealogy and Local History Library in Alton, Illinois will share resources in this library with the audience. In addition to assisting library patrons, she helps update the library collection, answers genealogy mail requests, and writes articles for the library newsletter. Her love for research which began some 30 years ago, has developed into writing family history reports for family and others.

Thursday, October 4, 2012. Witches of Salem: Researching Your High-flying Ancestors. Join us as Tom Pearson discusses books, manuscripts, microfilms and Internet sources of information on legal proceedings and punishments imposed for persons accused as witches in Europe and colonial New England. Mr. Pearson holds a B.A. (History) from Eureka College (IL), and the M.L.S. (Library Science) from the University of Illinois. He is a U.S. Air Force veteran, has worked for St. Louis Public Library since 1984, and often lectures at genealogical venues on the Civil War. Mr. Pearson is newsletter editor for the Missouri State Genealogical Association as well as its blog, MoSGA Messenger, and author of several genealogical resource books. Join us - visitors always welcome - but watch our for low-flying brooms!

Thursday, November 1, 2012. Nominations for elected positions followed by a lecture on The History of Funeral Directing , Embalming, and George Renner and Sons Funeral Home, presented by William C. Renner. Hear how funeral customs changed and the funeral industry evolved over the years, along with a history of Renner Funeral Home from its beginning in 1934 until present day. Mr. Renner is a life-long resident of Belleville and graduate of Althoff Catholic High School. He attended Southwestern Illinois College and is a 1977 graduate of the School of Mortuary Science, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale and is a U.S. Army veteran.. He has worked at George Renner and Sons Funeral Home for the past 35 years and is one of the third generation of Renners to own the business.

Thursday, December 6, 2012. Our Annual Christmas Party.

Our monthly meetings begin at 7:30 pm at the St. Luke's Parish Hall, 226 N. Church St. in Belleville, Illinois.

We are always looking for good speakers on genealogical topics. Let us know if you can recommend any speaker(s) from the St. Louis Metro Area, or if you can speak on a topic of interest to our Society.

For more information or program suggestions, please contact Mary K. Bauer, Program Chairperson via e-mail or you may call (618) 476-1587.

Visitors and Guests are always welcome!

Wednesday, August 01, 2012

THE DISCOVERY OF WITCHES (1647) BY MATTHEW HOPKINS

Matthew Hopkins was Britain’s notorious Witchfinder General:

LINK

ORGANIZATION OF CAMPS IN THE UNITED CONFEDERATE VETERANS (UCV)

A directory of camps in the UCV; available full-text are editions published 1896-1914:

LINK

THE CIVIL WAR IN MISSOURI: A MILITARY HISTORY

Louis S. Gerteis, author of “Civil War St. Louis,” thinks many Civil War scholars vastly underrate the importance of military actions in Missouri. His new book attempts (successfully) to remedy their short-sightedness:

LINK

NARA-KC AUGUST GENEALOGY WORKSHOP

The National Archives at Kansas City will offer the following genealogy workshop, Building Your Genealogy Toolbox: Exploring National Archives Online Resources, on Friday, August 3 from 10:00 – 11:30 a.m. The workshop will be held at 400 West Pershing Road, Kansas City, Missouri 64108.

Workshop Description:

Building Your Genealogy Toolbox: Exploring National Archives Online Resources
Friday, August 3, 10:00 – 11:30 a.m.

This fast-paced class will provide a quick introduction to the National Archives’ Online Public Access (OPA), Access to Archival Databases (AAD), and the National Archives website:

www.archives.gov.

Participants will gain familiarity with these tools and the resources they provide.

To make a reservation for this free workshop, please call 816-268-8000 or email:

kansascity.archives@nara.gov.

The National Archives at Kansas City is one of 15 facilities nationwide where the public has access to Federal archival records. It is home to historical records dating from the 1820s to the 1990s created or received by Federal agencies in Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota. For more information, call 816-268-8000 or visit:

www.archives.gov/central-plains/kansas-city.