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MoSGA Messenger, The Official Blog of the Missouri State Genealogical Association
Serving Missouri ancestor seekers since 7 November 2007

Tom Pearson, Editor

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Friday, June 29, 2012

PRESERVE THE PENSIONS!

FGS is spearheading an effort to digitize War of 1812 Pension Records:

LINK

FAMILY SEARCH UPDATES PAGE

List of what’s been added recently:

LINK

LAST HONORS AT WORDEN

Civil War vets buried at this cemetery in southwestern Illinois get some long overdue recognition:

LINK

NARA RECORDS MOVING TO NPRC

These records currently stored in Washington, DC will be moving to the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis later this year:

LINK

BECOME A GOOGLE POWER SEARCHER—FOR FREE!

Google has just announced that it is offering a free, online, community-based course on how to become a power searcher. Registration is required, and the link is here.

Google gives these details about the course:

• Registration is open from June 26, 2012 to July 16, 2012.
• New classes will become available Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday starting on July 10, 2012 and ending on July 19, 2012.
• Course-related activities will end on July 23, 2012.
• Six 50-minute classes.
• Interactive activities to practice new skills.
• Opportunities to connect with others using Google Groups, Google+, and Hangouts on Air.
• Upon passing the post-course assessment, a printable Certificate of Completion will be emailed to you.

I don’t know how the course will work out but it definitely sounds quite interesting. Just think - you could become a certified Google Power Searcher!

VERY BEST FREE SOFTWARE

This massive list is a hand-picked selection of the best software featured on the Gizmo's Freeware site. They're calling it the best of the best in free software--the modern equivalent of their well known "46 Best Ever Freeware" list of a few years ago, except that there are a lot more than 46 products on this list:

LINK

Wednesday, June 27, 2012

GETTYSBURG ON HORSEBACK

It’s possible to see battlefield locations on horseback that aren’t accessible by auto or tour bus:

LINK

GEORGE WASHINGTON, SPYMASTER

George Washington may not have been our greatest military mind ever (although, to give him his due, he won when it really counted), but he was a crackerjack spymaster:

LINK

WORLD WAR I CAVE PAINTINGS

During WWI, many French soldiers were sheltered in underground quarries. Numerous such quarries are decorated with the (often beautiful) paintings and carvings they made on quarry walls:

LINK

Note: Farmers in the area to this day uncover dozens of bodies while working their fields. Workers sorting potatoes also often discover unpleasant surprises: WWI grenades resembled potatoes, and do so even more now that they've spent 100 years in the French soil...

OAK RIDGE BOYS (AND GIRLS)

They labored by the thousands at their secret city in Tennessee, birthing a weapon that (it was hoped) would end WWII in a horrific instant:

LINK

HEROES OF THE LITTLE BIGHORN

The Little Bighorn Massacre took place on 25 June 1876. Did you know that many of the U.S. Army soldiers killed there were bona-fide Civil War heroes?

LINK

Saturday, June 23, 2012

ANCESTRY TESTING TRIES FOR PINPOINT GEOGRAPHIC ACCURACY

Scientists aren’t quite there yet—-but they’re getting closer every day:

LINK

DEAD CONFEDERATES BLOG

Interesting posts about topics that get this Civil War nut’s dander up:

LINK

MERCHANT MARINE SHIPPING MOVEMENT CARDS

These cards in the collection of the National Archives (UK) track movement of Allied Merchant Marine vessels, 1939-1945:

LINK

Note: Cards don’t provide crew lists, just info on the vessel in question. The cards do note if vessel was torpedoed, hit a mine, or sank during bad weather.

THE COMMAND IS FORWARD (1919) BY ALEXANDER WOOLLCOTT

The Command is Forward: Tales of the A.E.F. Battlefields, As They Appeared in the Stars and Stripes (New York: The Century Co., 1919), by Alexander Woollcott, illust. by Cyrus Leroy Baldridge (page images at HathiTrust):

LINK

1812: MADISON'S DISASTROUS WAR

The National Archives at Kansas City will host Dr. Richard Barbuto on Thursday, June 28 at 6:30 p.m. for a discussion titled 1812: Madison’s Disastrous War. A 6:00 p.m. reception will precede the event.

June 18 marks the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812 and to coincide with this anniversary Barbuto will discuss the opening year of the war and President James Madison’s role. Barbuto will address the road to war, the surrender of Detroit, the debacle at Queenston Heights, and the farce at Buffalo. Duels, dirty politics, interesting characters, and high human drama will be highlighted.

This lecture is part of the One of 44 Lecture Series being offered in conjunction with the School House to White House exhibit currently on display at the National Archives through February 23, 2013. School House to White House focuses on the education of the Presidents. The Archives will offer the One of 44 Lecture Series throughout the year and will include topics related to the U.S. Presidents (President Barack Obama is the 44th U.S. President) along with some of the major decisions they encountered during their term in office.

For more information or to make a reservation for this free event call 816-268-8010 or email us here.

About the speaker

Richard Barbuto is professor and deputy director of the Department of Military History at the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. He is a twenty-three year veteran of the U.S. Army and author of Niagara 1814: America Invades Canada. He was awarded a doctorate in American history from the University of Kansas in 1996.

The National Archives at Kansas City is one of 15 facilities nationwide where the public has access to Federal archival records. It is home to historical records dating from the 1820s to the 1990s created or received by Federal agencies in Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota. For more information, call 816-268-8000, email us here, or visit our website.

Thursday, June 21, 2012

WHAT WAS THAT BOOK?

At times you have probably partially remembered a book you read when you were younger. You know a few plot details, may even remember the color of the book’s cover or details about the cover illustration—-but you don’t remember the author or title. Well, there’s a website now that can help you out with your remembrance of books past:

LINK

SERIALS LIST AT ONLINE BOOKS PAGE

A lengthy list of serials (journals, magazines, newspapers, and other periodicals) for which a full/partial run is freely available on the Internet:

LINK

BOYD’S DIRECTORY OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

Various volumes for 1860-1909:

LINK

BEST (AND WORST) STATES FOR RETIREMENT

You might have some quibbles with these lists, but they generally seem to be quite helpful in terms of categories used to create the rankings:

LINK

Tuesday, June 19, 2012

JING

Free screenshot capture tool:

LINK

WAR OF 1812 PENSION MATCH CHALLENGE

The Illinois State Genealogical Society is proud to support the Federation of Genealogical Societies’ “Preserve the Pensions” campaign.

In support of this digitization project the ISGS announces the ISGS $10,000 War of 1812 Pension Match Challenge. ISGS will MATCH any contribution (up to the first $10,000) made to the Preserve the Pensions project before December 31, 2012. For instance, if you donate $100, the ISGS will match your contribution for a total of $200! In addition, Ancestry.com has announced it will also match ALL ISGS contributions which would mean any contribution you make will actually be QUADRUPLED! Your $100 contribution would become a $400 contribution! Any size contribution is welcome! A $10 contribution equals about 80 pages of Pension files digitized as part of the Preserve the Pensions project.

The goal of the “Preserve the Pensions” campaign is to raise the $3.7 Million needed to digitize the War of 1812 Pension Application Files that are currently stored in the National Archives and make them freely available online. There are over 180,000 Pension files that total over 7.2 million pages! The National Archives gets over three thousand requests per year to photocopy these records and this hard use is taking its toll on the original documents. By digitizing these documents we could halt further damage to these historical documents. The pages are being digitized as funds become available and some of these files are already viewable by visiting Fold3.com.

To make a contribution via Pay Pal or for more information visit our web site. Or mail a check, made payable to Illinois State Genealogical Society (Put “War of 1812” on Memo line), to Illinois State Genealogical Society, P.O. Box 10195, Springfield IL 62791-0195.

The War of 1812 – America’s Second War for Independence

The War of 1812, often called the “forgotten war”, shaped the identity of the United States. The War of 1812 is well known for giving us the “Star Spangled Banner”, the burning of the White House, and the Battle of New Orleans. Over 300,000 people took part in the War of 1812, including three presidents (James Madison, Andrew Jackson, and William Henry Harrison), and members of eighteen Native American tribes.

Illinois and the War of 1812

During the War of 1812 the Illinois Territory was on the border of a great conflict between Great Britain and a newly born United States of America. The Territory of Illinois survived the War of 1812 and gained its statehood in 1818. For more information on how Illinois was affected by the War of 1812 go here.

About Illinois State Genealogical Society

The Illinois State Genealogical Society (ISGS) was formed in 1968 through the cooperative effort and forward thinking of Illinois genealogical society representatives, who envisioned a statewide genealogical organization. ISGS is a not-for-profit, nonsectarian, educational organization. ISGS was established for the following purposes:

• To stimulate an interest in the people who contributed to the establishment and development of the State of Illinois.

• To seek, preserve, and make available data pertaining to individuals, families, and groups who lived in Illinois and to events which took place therein.

• To inform people of the value of, and need for, preserving family and local history for posterity.

• To encourage the formation of local genealogical societies and to coordinate and disseminate information.

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and on our blog.

Contact:

Illinois State Genealogical Society
P.O. Box 10195
Springfield, IL 62791-0195
(217) 789-1968

DIGITIZE YOUR LIFE

This may be a Plus article by Dick Eastman, but even the publicly available portion is interesting and may well nudge you towards the digitization fast track:

LINK

THE DREAM IS DEAD

Dick Eastman laments the failure of a free, reliable, high-security operating system to become popular with personal computer users:

LINK

Sunday, June 17, 2012

PETROLEUM V. NASBY

You’ve probably never heard of Petroleum V. Nasby: during the Civil War, however, nearly every American--and many Britons--knew that name:

LINK

KILLING THEM WITH KINDNESS

Recent research has revealed that 1 in 4 slaves liberated between 1862 and 1865 by legislation or the passing Union Army was dead by 1870. What happened?

Students of the Civil War know that disease killed two soldiers for every one killed in combat. Farm boys didn’t have much resistance to germs encountered in Civil War training camps that had larger populations than the counties most of those farm boys were raised in. Well, most slaves during their captivity had encountered even fewer people than had the typical farm boy—so freedom meant exposure to lots of new people, and lots of never-before encountered (and often potentially lethal) germs:

LINK

CATAPULT CRAZY!

Not remotely genealogy-related--unless your medieval ancestors were famous catapult makers or users--but catapults are cool:

Everything you need to know about catapults, including instructions on building your own (from tiny models to working full-scale siege engines):

LINK

SAVE ON YOUR CELL

If your cell phone isn’t constantly glued to your ear, you may be able to save a lot of money on your cell phone bill:

LINK

Friday, June 15, 2012

SCOURGES OF THE SKIES

The Red Baron led all WWI aces with 80 confirmed kills, but who was the top Allied ace? Hint—it wasn’t an American:

LINK

KETTLE HILL

What happened on Kettle Hill (and on a second hill just to its north)? Why, it’s merely the location where our only president to receive the award earned his Congressional Medal of Honor:

LINK

A LUDICROUS AND UNNECESSARY WAR

No, this famous historian wasn’t talking about Vietnam, Iran, or Afghanistan:

LINK

MoSGA 21st CENTURY FUND AWARDS

Press Release:
10 June 2012

The Missouri State Genealogical Association [MoSGA] announces awards totaling $1,124 to two Missouri societies for their efforts in preserving local records.

The Holt County Historical Society, located in Mound City, MO, will receive a grant of $796.00 to purchase equipment to digitally record the society’s collection of family histories, obituaries and photographs. The scanned records will be available to researchers once the project is completed.

The Phelps County Genealogical Society, located in Rolla, MO, will receive a grant of $328.00 to purchase archival supplies to store records recently rescued from the Phelps County Circuit Court.

The grants will be presented during MoSGA’s 31st Annual Genealogy Conference held July 13-14, 2012 at Stoney Creek Inn and Conference Center, Columbia MO. Information on the conference is available on our website.

The 21st Century Fund was established in 2005 during MoSGA’s 25th Anniversary. The fund provides grants of up to $1,000 to Missouri societies, libraries and/or archives to promote the preservation and publication of Missouri genealogical data.

July 1, 2012 starts the 2013 grant cycle. The 2013 grant application and guidelines will be available on MoSGA’s website after July 1st.

The 21st Century Fund is supported by generous donations from the genealogical community. If you wish to make a tax deductible contribution, please send it to MoSGA, 21st Century Fund, PO Box 833, Columbia MO 65205-0833. Thank You!

Martha L. Henderson, Chair
21st Century Fund Committee
Missouri State Genealogical Association

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

IT’S MORE EFFECTIVE IF YOU PUT IT ON…

The British developed body armor for their troops in WWII, and actually ordered 500,000 sets—but it was never worn in combat:

LINK

ONE A DAY…

That’s the rate at which U.S. servicemen and women are taking their lives during 2012:

LINK

DEATH ONCE REMOVED

Can we win the war on terror by relying on drone strikes against top al Qaeda officials? Most analysts say no--drones should be just one part of a more comprehensive strategy:

LINK

DON’T KNOW NOTHIN’ ‘BOUT HISTORY

Turns out American kids aren’t the only ones who know next to nothing about history:

LINK

NOTE: Is it just me, or does it make anyone else uneasy that millions of persons eligible to vote in our next presidential election would fail a high school civics exam (err—if they even taught civics in our high schools anymore)?

WOMEN AT ANNAPOLIS

The steps taken to be ready to begin admitting women to the U.S. Naval Academy:

LINK

Saturday, June 09, 2012

WE’RE ALL HEROES…

…or so one of my local television stations seems to think. It never seems to occur to them that, if we're all heroes, then there's nothing special about being a hero... I made several posts recently about how I think the word “hero” is being applied lately to way too many people who really aren’t:

LINK

LINK

Turns out I’m not alone—this blogger heartily agrees:

LINK

BYE BYE BLOATWARE

Computer movin’ kinda slow? Your problem is probably bloatware—get rid of that junk in your computer’s trunk:

LINK

MILITARY JOURNALS FROM THE GPO

The GPO blog just ran this plug for military journals, and I thought it might interest some of you:

To protect the freedom and integrity of our country, the courageous men and women of the United States military stand ready and committed to meet the challenges that lie ahead. Many of these challenges require deep study and broad analyses of a host of international strategic policy issues. The U.S. Government Printing Office offers for sale a special collection of military journals providing a wide-ranging intellectual forum for the discussion of American military issues, both strategic and tactical. These journals are essential tools for anyone interested in the host of vital policy and operational issues affecting America's military forces.

LINK

OLDER ADULTS AND INTERNET USE

As of April 2012, 53% of American adults age 65 and older use the internet or email. Though these adults are still less likely than all other age groups to use the internet, the latest data represent the first time that half of seniors are going online. After several years of very little growth among this group, these gains are significant.

As of February 2012, one third (34%) of internet users age 65 and older use social networking sites such as Facebook, and 18% do so on a typical day. By comparison, email use continues to be the bedrock of online communications for seniors. As of August 2011, 86% of internet users age 65 and older use email, with 48% doing so on a typical day.

Looking at gadget ownership, we find that a growing share of seniors own a cell phone. Some 69% of adults ages 65 and older report that they have a mobile phone, up from 57% in May 2010. Even among those currently age 76 and older, 56% report owning a cell phone of some kind, up from 47% of this generation in 2010.

Read or download the full report

Thursday, June 07, 2012

NEW YORK STATE RECORDS AT ANCESTRY.COM

PROVO, UTAH – (June 6, 2012) – Starting today, a valuable select group of record collections, provided through a partnership with the New York State Archives and Library, are now available free to New York state residents at www.ancestry.com/newyork. New York state residents can access these special New York collections with a simple zip code verification process.

The new records include the first available online index for the 1940 U.S. Federal Census for New York which includes more than 13 million resident names with details including age, birthplace, street address and residence in 1935. These records reveal a unique snapshot of the state as it emerged from the Great Depression, providing a valuable gateway to New York family information in the years leading up to World War II.

To complement the 1940 Census records, Ancestry.com is offering a bevy of additional records with its New York collection, including two state censuses never before released in digital form and a dozen other relevant collections spanning nearly 400 years of state history.

Ancestry.com has partnered with the New York State Archives to publish the 1925, 1915 and 1892 New York State censuses. Both the 1925 and 1915 censuses are digitized and available for the first time online, and along with the 1892 state census, provide the next step for discovery beyond the revelations of the 1940 Federal Census. These censuses are unique because they fall in the interim years between federal censuses, providing additional insight into population and societal trends in the state. For example, between the 1910 and 1920 federal censuses, New York experienced a population surge of 1.3 million residents due to heavy immigration (14 percent growth). The 1892 state census provides information that was lost when the 1890 U.S. Federal Census was damaged and destroyed by fire in 1921.

Like many from the Empire State, former New York City Mayor and native New Yorker, Ed Koch, and his family are found throughout many records held at Ancestry.com, including some of the New York collection. Koch’s father, Leib, first appears in a 1910 New York Passenger List when he immigrated to the United States from Ukraine alone at the age of 16. The 1915 New York State Census shows Koch’s father living with his sister in the Bronx. Edward Koch first appears in the 1925 New York State Census, which records him as an infant having been born in the Bronx in 1924. Koch appears again in the 1930 U.S. Federal Census as “Edwin”, residing in an Eastern European Bronx neighborhood where he lived with his parents and brother in a $75/month apartment.

“Like so many New Yorkers, I am extremely proud of our great state and am excited to have the opportunity to access these digitized records with others in the state,” said Koch. “With such a wealth of information now available for free online at Ancestry.com, citizens past and present have the opportunity to embrace their connection to New York.”

The 1940 U.S. Federal Census features Ancestry.com’s new groundbreaking Interactive Image Viewer that has been designed to enable even the most novice family historian to easily peruse document pages. The new feature adds highlights, transcriptions and more, right on the census page so that users can access the small details by scrolling over the sections to clearly see what was recorded by census takers. With the ability to zoom into individual records, these new features should dramatically improve the usability of the 1940 Census, which previously only included images of the paper records. This experience will be available throughout the entire 1940 U.S. Federal Census when it is fully indexed later in the year.

In addition to the New York census collections, Ancestry.com is also offering New York residents free access to more than a dozen state records collections through its partnership with the New York State Archives and Library. These records span from 1600 through the 1960s and include titles such as WWII Enlisted Men Cards, WWI Veterans Service Data and Town Clerks' Registers of Men Who Served in the Civil War.

“Ancestry.com has worked tirelessly to be the first company to fully index the 1940 New York Federal Census, while maintaining our commitment to provide the best experience possible ,” said Tim Sullivan, CEO of Ancestry.com. “As a native New Yorker myself, I understand the pride residents have for our great state and am excited to be able to offer such a wealth of history to each and every New Yorker.”

All New York records are available at: www.ancestry.com/newyork. Visitors will be required to submit their New York state zip code to access the records collections.

About Ancestry.com

Ancestry.com Inc. (Nasdaq:ACOM) is the world's largest online family history resource, with 1.9 million paying subscribers. More than 10 billion records have been added to the site in the past 15 years. Ancestry users have created more than 34 million family trees containing approximately 4 billion profiles. In addition to its flagship site www.ancestry.com, Ancestry.com offers several localized Web sites designed to empower people to discover, preserve and share their family history.

Wednesday, June 06, 2012

READY FOR YOUR CLOSE-UP?

Hi there,

We're gearing up for the second season of the History Channel show How the States Got Their Shapes, which explores American history and culture through different locations and themes. We've added a "trivia quiz" element to the show that has different contestants related to the theme face off against one another in a very laid back, fun, casual trivia quiz (again, related to the theme).

We'll be filming a "North/South" episode later this summer in St. Louis and I'm trying to find people to participate. One of our trivia rounds is going to focus on the history of slavery in the colonial United States as framed by the North and the South. I'm hoping to find people who can trace their lineage back to either slaves or slave masters to possibly participate in this trivia round. I'm looking for big personalities and fun, funny, outgoing people. It'd be great if they knew each other, but it's not a deal breaker.

I'm hoping you can possibly suggest people, or help point me in the right direction!

Thanks in advance for your help.

Best,

Erin Yokel
4922 Fairmont Avenue
Suite 300
Bethesda, MD 20814
240.223.3435 Office
301.237.8036 Mobile

http://www.halfyardproductions.com

Tuesday, June 05, 2012

WHAT HAPPENED ON D-DAY?

It’s not an exaggeration to state that all hell broke loose. Allied casualty figures just for the June 6th landings until recently were thought to number around 2,500 deaths, but recent painstaking research puts the figure just for American fatalities at 2,499--with 1,915 additional deaths suffered by Allied forces:

D-Day and the Battle of Normandy—Your Questions Answered

SECRETS OF A CEMETERY

The Fredericksburg (VA) National Cemetery includes some resting places of special interest: the only set of brothers known to be buried here (both of whom were killed during in a railroad accident during the Spanish-American War); a black physician killed during WWI; and a WWI yeomanette who survived the war only to succumb to disease ten years later:

LINK

IN FLANDERS FIELDS

The poppy is now viewed as a symbol of ultimate wartime sacrifice because of a short poem written by a Canadian doctor during WWI. He would later become one of that war’s 17 million victims:

LINK

WWI casualty figures: LINK

CRACKING ULTRA

Cracking Germany’s wartime code involved the ongoing efforts of Allied Europe’s top mathematicians and intelligence analysts—and a U-Boat commander’s inadvertent failure to destroy his captured vessel before surrendering to a British warship:

LINK

Saturday, June 02, 2012

FINDING THE INDIVIDUAL AND THE ICONIC IN CIVIL WAR DOCUMENTS: A WORKSHOP

June 16, 2012
9:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

In his popular “150 Years Ago” column for The Columbia Daily Tribune, Rudi Keller often has to compose thumbnail sketches of individuals from the Civil War period on tight deadlines. Learn about the resources he turns to time and again for accurate information in a hurry: Goodspeed’s county histories, the SHSMO surname index, Ancestry.com, and other well-developed lineage directories.

SHSMO Curator Joan Stack has studied the visual culture of the period, from patriotic envelopes to printed currency and illustrated newspapers such as Harper’s Weekly and Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper. She will share with you how to draw important conclusions from these historical records.

And Reference Specialist Amy L. Waters will show you how to use government records, including census, military service, land, and pension, to determine the part your ancestors played in this national conflict.

Reserve your spot by June 12 at (573) 882-7083. $25 nonmembers • $15 members

The State Historical Society of Missouri
Research Center
1020 Lowry Street
Columbia, MO 65201

FREE ACCESS TO FOLD3.COM WAR OF 1812 RECORDS DURING JUNE!

Good morning,

I wanted to send a quick note letting you know that Fold3 will be opening up all of their War of 1812 records to the public for free during June. This is in commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the commencement of the war. The collection consists of more than 400,000 images including 233,000 images from the War of 1812 Pension Files never before available online. The databases provided for free included:

1. War of 1812 Pension Files
2. War of 1812 Prize Cases, Southern District Court, NY
3. Letters Received by The Adjutant General, 1805-1821
4. War of 1812 Service Records

The Pension files that are included are only a small percentage of the entire collection that will eventually be available online. For more information on the War of 1812 Pension and Bounty Land Warrant Application Files, click here.

Email me if you have any questions,

Matt Deighton, Specialist, Public Relations
Ancestry.com

UNDERSTANDING THE WAR IN AFGHANISTAN

This post on the Government Book Blog discusses the significance of Memorial Day, and looks at a new book about the (never-ending) war in Afghanistan:

LINK

MISSOURI HISTORY MUSEUM UPDATE

The following sources have recently been added to their Genealogy and Local History Index

1. The Pet Milk Magazine (1952-1967) and Profile (1966-1967)
2. Souvenir Program of the 21st Anniversary "Y" Circus, May 6-7, 1955
3. 25th Anniversary, Progress Club, International Shoe Company, 1917-1942
4. Roster of Occidental Lodge No. 163, A.F. & A.M. (1903)
5. Manual of the First Presbyterian Church, St. Louis, Mo., 1888
6. Roster, Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry, Valley of St. Louis, 1946

NORMANDY HIGH SCHOOL SAGA

Scans of this St. Louis area high school’s yearbooks are available for 1924-1983:

LINK

LIBRARY OF MICHIGAN DIGITAL COLLECTIONS

Links to 257 different online collections (a good number of which will interest genealogists/local historians):

LINK

NOTE: There is public access to most of these collections, although a number are restricted to UM faculty/students.

An example of a public collection is Transportation History: Railroads—14,000 digitized items concerning railroads in the U.S., Canada, Mexico, Britain, France, Germany, and Russia:

LINK