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Saturday, June 23, 2012

1812: MADISON'S DISASTROUS WAR

The National Archives at Kansas City will host Dr. Richard Barbuto on Thursday, June 28 at 6:30 p.m. for a discussion titled 1812: Madison’s Disastrous War. A 6:00 p.m. reception will precede the event.

June 18 marks the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812 and to coincide with this anniversary Barbuto will discuss the opening year of the war and President James Madison’s role. Barbuto will address the road to war, the surrender of Detroit, the debacle at Queenston Heights, and the farce at Buffalo. Duels, dirty politics, interesting characters, and high human drama will be highlighted.

This lecture is part of the One of 44 Lecture Series being offered in conjunction with the School House to White House exhibit currently on display at the National Archives through February 23, 2013. School House to White House focuses on the education of the Presidents. The Archives will offer the One of 44 Lecture Series throughout the year and will include topics related to the U.S. Presidents (President Barack Obama is the 44th U.S. President) along with some of the major decisions they encountered during their term in office.

For more information or to make a reservation for this free event call 816-268-8010 or email us here.

About the speaker

Richard Barbuto is professor and deputy director of the Department of Military History at the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. He is a twenty-three year veteran of the U.S. Army and author of Niagara 1814: America Invades Canada. He was awarded a doctorate in American history from the University of Kansas in 1996.

The National Archives at Kansas City is one of 15 facilities nationwide where the public has access to Federal archival records. It is home to historical records dating from the 1820s to the 1990s created or received by Federal agencies in Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota. For more information, call 816-268-8000, email us here, or visit our website.

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