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MoSGA Messenger, The Official Blog of the Missouri State Genealogical Association
Serving Missouri ancestor seekers since 7 November 2007

Tom Pearson, Editor

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Saturday, December 24, 2011

JUNETEENTH CELEBRATION

Saturday, February 18, 2012 at 9:00 AM --4:00PM

In cooperation with Mid-American Afro-American Genealogy Interest Coalition, Midwest Genealogy Center presents "Juneteenth in February". Classes and displays will help the researcher with intermediate and advanced research techniques. Consultants will also be available to answer your toughest questions. Call 816-252-7228 to register for the workshop and schedule time with a consultant. Speakers include Lyle Gibson, Bill Curtis, Preston Washington, and Angela McComas.

Thursday, December 22, 2011

IT'S THAT TIME AGAIN!

Time to renew your MoSGA membership (or become a member if you aren't already)! You may copy and paste this blog post into your word processor, or fill out the form on the last page of your newsletter (if currently a MoSGA member).

Remember, too, that a MoSGA membership is a great gift idea for the genealogist in your family!

MoSGA Membership Application & Renewal Form

INDIVIDUAL MEMBERSHIP: ____ $20 per year. 4 journals & newsletters; one vote and one conference discount.

FAMILY MEMBERSHIP: ____ $30 per year. 4 journals & newsletters; two votes and two conference discounts.

INSTITUTIONAL MEMBERSHIP: __$20 per year: for societies & libraries. Same benefits as individuals; one vote can be assigned.

CONTRIBUTING MEMBER: ____ $40 per year; same benefits as individual. Donation advantages.

PATRON MEMBER: ____ $100 per year; same benefits as individual; 20% discount on publications (not to be used for resale) and 20% discount on annual conference. Donation advantages.

LIFE MEMBERSHIP: ____ $400 One time payment; other benefits same as individual. Active member status for life. Never needs renewing; non-assignable.

FOREIGN MEMBERSHIP: ____ $40 per year. 4 journals & newsletters; one vote and one conference discount.

Email address: ______________________________________________________.

MoSGA Newsletter Preference: PDF format ____ Print copy ___
I have a home computer and home access to the Internet: Yes ___ No ___
I have home access to at least one genealogy subscription service: Yes ___ No ___
I belong to at least one other genealogical society: Yes ___ No ___
I have published an article in the MoSGA Journal: Yes ___ No ___
I am interested in working as a MoSGA volunteer: Yes ___ No ___
I am interested in serving on the MoSGA Board: Yes ___ No ___

Name ______________________________________________________________
Address ___________________________________________________________
City ______________________________________ State _____ Zip ____________

New member _____ Renewal _____ Include check payable to MoSGA and send to:

MoSGA Membership, PO Box 833, Columbia, MO 65205-0833

Thanks, and happy holidays!

MoSGA 21st CENTURY FUND GRANTS

The 21st Century Fund was established in 2005 during MoSGA's s 25th Anniversary. The fund provides grants of up to $1,000 to Missouri societies, libraries and/or archives to promote the preservation and publication of Missouri genealogical data.

The 2012 grant application and guidelines are now available. Application deadline is April 30, 2012.

The 21st Century Fund is supported by generous donations from the genealogical community. If you wish to make a tax-deductible contribution, please send it to MoSGA, 21st Century Fund, PO Box 833, Columbia MO 65205-0833. Many thanks for your continuing support!

GUNS AT GETTYSBURG

When a Civil War buff talks about guns, he doesn’t mean shoulder arms or handguns: he means cannons! This blog post discusses the types of artillery pieces you will see during your next visit to Gettysburg National Military Park:

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THE UNKINDEST CUT

Never heard of Dr. Leonid Rogozov? He had to remove his own appendix while on duty at the Soviet Antarctic Research Station in 1961:

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SARDINES IN A CAN

Duty on a Civil War ironclad was not without hazards. The vessels were hellishly hot during the summer, and direct hits by large projectiles could cause concussions, fragmentation injuries, and severe burns if a boiler exploded or steam pipe ruptured. Many sailors assigned to duty in southern waters came down with malaria or yellow fever. It was also exceedingly noisy below decks—-many ironclad sailors who survived the war were partially deaf and/or suffered from tinnitus:

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BLACK ANGEL OF BASTOGNE

A Congolese-born Belgian nurse saved hundreds of Americans during the Battle of the Bulge, but only received an award for her compassion and courage last week. Why the delay? The U.S. Army thought she’d been killed when a German bomb utterly destroyed the hospital that she’d been posted to:

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COLONEL SANTA

On Christmas Eve in 1955, a North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) colonel answering the secret emergency red phone was surprised to hear a little boy’s voice asking him if he was really Santa Claus. Turns out a local Sears store’s “Talk to Santa” ad misprinted Santa’s phone number—the number printed in the ad happened to be that of NORAD’s secret hotline:

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Wednesday, December 21, 2011

FILE WIGGLER

Another funny name—this file conversion site can help you open some audio or video files that stump your computer:

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STICK-IN-THE-MUD GENERALS

During 1861, Lincoln’s biggest problem was getting his generals to do something:

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TWEETDECK

Funny name, but what does it do? This free app helps you monitor all the social networking stuff you do from one convenient dashboard:

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NO HITCHHIKERS ALLOWED!

If you’re using a wireless router at home, it may well be unsecured. If so, skinflint neighbors (and kiddie porn perverts) can use your bandwidth to hop onto the Internet:

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Monday, December 19, 2011

PHOTO FILMSTRIP

Want to make a DVD of those holiday/reunion photos? This free application can make it happen with a bare minimum of fuss and bother:

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CLIP ART BONANZA

Need a free image (actually illustrations, photographs, animations, and sounds, to be precise) for that project you’re trying to finish? Your BFFs at Microsoft are here to help:

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CEDAR & VERNON COUNTY GS UPDATE

Hello:

The November 2011 newsletter is available on our website.

Regards,
Nancy Thompson
Cedar & Vernon County Genealogical Society
218 W. Walnut St., Nevada, MO 64772

web: www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~motcogs/
email: Cedar.VernonCoMO@centurytel.net

FRANCES QUISENBERRY

Frances Quisenberry of Mexico, Missouri has died at age 91. She was a charter member and tireless worker for the Audrain County Genealogical Society. She was given an Award of Merit by MoSGA for her efforts in that regard. Read the entire obit here:

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Thursday, December 15, 2011

HOW TO GEEK

Are you a confirmed geek (or, perhaps, a closet geek finally ready to come out into the light)? Then you’ll probably like the How to Geek website:

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THE RIFLE-MUSKET QUESTION

Did rifle-muskets really change the face of battle during the Civil War, or did they have less effect on tactics than some historians and Civil War buffs seem to think?

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REGISTER OF ENLISTMENTS (U.S. ARMY), 1798-1914

A subscription database, but likely to be useful for many genealogists:

This database contains a register of enlistments in the U.S. Regular Army from 1798-1914. The Regular Army is comprised of career soldiers and maintained through peacetime. Therefore, this database will not usually include individuals who enlisted as part of a reserve or during wartime for limited periods of time, or in a military unit raised by a state. Data in these registers was compiled from a variety of other military records, including enlistment papers, muster rolls, and unit records. Information listed on these records includes:

• Name of enlistee
• Age at time of enlistment
• Birthplace
• Date of enlistment
• Enlistment place
• Occupation
• Physical description (eye color, hair color, complexion, and height)
• Rank, company, and regiment
• Date and cause of discharge
• Remarks

Note: some of this information may only be obtained by viewing the register image. Also, the register images are usually two pages long. When viewing an image, be sure to scroll all the way to the right in order to see all pages that are part of that record.

These records are arranged chronologically and alphabetically according to first letter of the surname.

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HAPPY 375th!

That’s how old the National Guard is:

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RABBI-CHAPLAINS OF THE CIVIL WAR

The federal army’s first rabbi-chaplain never finished his rabbinical studies—-before the war, he’d been a liquor salesman:

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ROOTSWEB REVIEW

The December 14, 2011 issue of Rootsweb Review is the last ever:

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Wednesday, December 14, 2011

REDHAVEN OUTLINE

If there’s something you need to keep track of, this free program can probably help you do it. As the creators state on their website, it’s great for:

* making lists
* making lists of lists
* keeping track of research information
* preparing speeches and presentations
* developing the structure of research papers
* organizing computer shortcuts and favorite websites
* keeping records

LINK

RETURNS FROM U.S. MILITARY POSTS, 1806-1916

A subscription database available from Ancestry.com:

This database contains returns from U.S. military posts from the early 1800's to 1916, with a few returns extending through 1917.

Army Regulations stipulated that every post was to submit a return to the Adjutant General, usually at monthly intervals. These returns showed:

• The units stationed at each post
• The strength of each unit
• Names and duties of the officers
• Number of officers present and absent
• Listing of official communications received
Record of events

This information was returned on forms provided by the Office of the Adjutant General. Over the years, several changes were made to the forms, but the general information recorded was the same. In the earlier years some returns were sent on manuscript forms. These manuscript forms followed the format of the printed forms. Earlier post returns also used the same forms as the regimental and organizational returns.

While most of the records in this collection consist of monthly post returns, some additional records, such as morning reports, field returns, rosters of officers, and other related papers, have been mixed in. These additional records provide supplemental information or act as substitutes for missing returns. Records are available for military posts in all 50 states, Washington D.C., Cuba, Panama Canal Zone, Philippine Islands, Puerto Rico, Canada, China, and Mexico.

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PROTECTING PARIS

During World War I, Paris officials decided that the best way to protect their city was to build a fake Paris for the Germans to bomb:

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WHY THEY FIGHT

Why do soldiers risk injury or death in battle? In some cases, it’s because of the drugs they were taking:

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Tuesday, December 13, 2011

GUIDE TO COLLECTIONS AT THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF HEALTH AND MEDICINE

An online guide to the various collections maintained by NMHM:

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REPORT TO THE JFK ASSASSINATION RECORDS REVIEW BOARD (1997)

Report made by a National Museum of Health & Medicine staffer regarding what records concerning the JFK assassination were held by institution in 1997. Part of the report deals with the question of whether NMHM ever had custody of the president’s brain:

LINK

HOSPITAL SHIPS MATERIAL IN THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF HEALTH & MEDICINE COLLECTION

Finding aid (1862-1952) for miscellaneous materials in the collection (many photographs, some artworks):

LINK

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF HEALTH & MEDICINE IMAGE GALLERIES

Images (mostly photos) on 14 different military medicine topics. A cautionary note warns that some images may not be suitable for all viewers:

LINK

Thursday, December 08, 2011

PICKING UP THE PIECES IF YOUR COMPUTER CRASHES

What should you do if you’re ever in that situation? Microsoft has some advice:

LINK

NOTE: You are doing regular back-ups, right?

FREE EBOOKS

A library discussion list I subscribe to has had a lot of chatter recently concerning the plight of small libraries that can’t afford free user download services. If your library is in that boat (or if you work in a library that’s in that boat), you should know that you (and your patrons) can access thousands of ebooks for free (legally) online:

LINK

And thousands of free audiobooks: LINK

NOTE: If your library does not offer free ebook, audiobook, and music downloads, you may want to get an Annual User card at a library that does. I think you’ll find that the cost of an Annual User card is much less than the cost of purchasing access to the number of items you’ll be able to download.

For example, a Mid-Continent Library Out-of-District Annual Card for residents of Missouri and Kansas costs $60. $60 will buy you approximately six new ebooks or three new audiobooks from an online vendor like Amazon.com. If you download just one ebook per week from Mid-Continent, that’s an annual savings to you of $460 ($520 - $60). If you download just one audiobook per week from Mid-Continent, that’s an annual savings to you of $980 ($1040 - $60).

Here's info from their website on their Out-of-District cards for Missouri and Kansas residents:

The following options are available to persons living outside of the Mid-Continent Public Library service area:

Out-of-District card -- New Out-of-District cards can be issued at any of our 30 branch locations. New Out-of-District cards will be issued only to Missouri or Kansas residents living outside the MCPL service area. You must be present to register for an Out-of-District card. There is a fee of $60.00 and the card is valid for one year. Cards about to expire or expired can be renewed in person or by mail, phone, or email.


More info here.

And here's Mid-Continent’s online guide to Digital Downloads:

LINK

KINDLE USERS’ GUIDE

Free guides for each Kindle incarnation are available here:

LINK

COLORED PATRIOTS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION (1855)

Didn’t know there were any? This free ebook will set you straight:

LINK

Wednesday, December 07, 2011

PRESERVING FAMILY MEMORIES

Kansas City, (MO)… The National Archives at Kansas City will be offering a free workshop, Preserving Family Memories, to the public on Friday, December 9 at 10:00 a.m.

This workshop is a quick overview of three vital components in family history: oral interviews, physical preservation, and reading old script. Oral interviews coupled with family papers and heirlooms provide the foundation for any genealogist’s family history research. Beginning at home with these pieces left by previous generations will launch you into other areas of research. Learn how to protect and preserve these precious assets for many generations to come. This workshop will be presented by Lori Cox-Paul, Director of Archival Operations, and Jennifer Audsley Moore, Archives Technician and Volunteer Coordinator.

To make a reservation for this free workshop, please call 816-268-8000 or email: kansascity.archives@nara.gov.

The National Archives at Kansas City is one of 13 facilities nationwide where the public has access to Federal archival records. It is home to historical records dating from the 1820s to the 1990s created or received by Federal agencies in Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota. For more information, call 816-268-8000 or go here.

OVERVIEW OF THE ATTACK ON PEARL HARBOR

Lots of information and images on the Navy History & Heritage Command website regarding the 7 December 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor:

LINK

NO LUCK? SPREAD OUT!

If you’re trying to solve a Civil War soldier mystery, you might try creating a spreadsheet that contains known information for that soldier and his relatives/friends in the same regiment. It will make it easier to see all their info at a glance, and will likely suggest additional sources of potential information on your soldier:

LINK

NORTH CAROLINA WWII DRAFT CARDS

PROVO, UTAH – (December 2, 2011) – In remembrance of the upcoming 70th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor marking the entrance of the United States into World War II, Ancestry.com (Nasdaq: ACOM), the world’s largest online family history resource, announced it has made available images of nearly two million draft cards filled out by North Carolina residents to its World War II records collection. The draft cards were completed by men living in North Carolina during the early 1940s who were born between 1897 and 1929, a more recent time period than ever made available before. Ancestry.com is offering six days (December 2-7) of free access to these U.S. World War II North Carolina Young Men’s Draft Cards, and its entire World War II records collection to help foster greater insight and detail into families’ histories.

The release of these Young Men’s Draft Cards from North Carolina marks Ancestry.com’s first installment of U.S. World War II draft cards from this series to be released online. Ancestry.com worked in conjunction with the National Archives and Records Administration in Atlanta to digitize the records and make them available on the site. Information such as name, serial number, address, age, place of birth, employer’s name and physical measurements are included on the cards.

In 1940, due to an increase in conflict around the world, President Franklin D. Roosevelt created the first peacetime selective service draft in the history of the U.S. With the country’s entrance into World War II a year later, a new selective service act required that all men between ages 18 and 65 register for the draft. Seven registrations were held between November 1940 and October 1946. More than 50 million American men registered, and more than 10 million of those were inducted into the U.S. Armed Forces. Until now, information on only one of these registrations had been made available to the public.

“North Carolinians have always played an important role within all branches of the U.S. military, and during World War II more of our residents served in the U.S. Army than in any other branch,” said Eric Muller, a University of North Carolina law professor who has written about the draft in WWII. “The draft cards that Ancestry.com has made available provide North Carolinians with an important resource to connect to their families’ history of World War II service.”

According to the North Carolina State Archives, more than 370,000 men and womenfrom the state served in all branches of the military during World War II. By the end of the War, nearly 10,000 Tar Heels had lost their lives in the line of duty.

Although they did not serve in the military, notable North Carolinians whose draft cards can be found in this collection include:

Andy Griffith—-Actor, producer and director known best for The Andy Griffith Show, on which he portrayed a sheriff in the fictional town of Mayberry, North Carolina, from 1960 to 1968. When Griffith registered for the draft as a 6’½” 18 year-old in June 1944 in Surry County, where he was born and raised, and his occupation was listed as “unemployed.”

Billy Graham—Famous American Christian evangelist known for his radio and television broadcasts. When Graham filled out his draft card through the registrar in Wheaton, Illinois in October 1940, he was a student at Wheaton College, but the slim 21-year-old (6’2½”, 140 pounds) listed his home address in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Ralph Earnhardt—NASCAR legend and patriarch of the Earnhardt racing dynasty, Ralph was father of NASCAR Hall of Famer Dale Earnhardt and grandfather of current NASCAR Sprint Cup driver Dale Earnhardt Jr. Earnhardt’s draft card notes the 18-year-old was born in Kannapolis, North Carolina and was working as a farmhand in town when he was drafted in February 1946. It also references a scar on the left side of his face.

In addition to the North Carolina Young Men’s Draft Cards, Ancestry.com is also featuring the following World War II records as part of the free promotion:

World War II Navy Muster Rolls (1939-1949)—The most comprehensive set of these records ever released online. Nearly all enlisted personnel who served aboard a Navy ship between January 1939 and January 1949 are included in this collection, including more than 2,400 Americans who were killed in the attack on Pearl Harbor.

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (Punchbowl Cemetery) Database—More than 120,000 records and images of headstones and names on memorials from 1949 to 1976. Of the 13,000 buried at the Cemetery, 700 are veterans who died in the attack on Pearl Harbor.

These new World War II collections can be found at www.ancestry.com/pearlharbor.

“World War II impacted millions of American families and we felt this was an appropriate time to make our collection available at no cost and provide the public an opportunity to explore through records, how the War may have touched their family,” said Josh Hanna, Executive Vice President, Ancestry.com. “Ancestry.com hosts the largest online collection of historical military records and these new additions to our World War II catalog add further depth to this important collection.”

About Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com)

Ancestry.com Inc. (Nasdaq: ACOM) is the world's largest online family history resource, with more than 1.7 million paying subscribers. More than 7 billion records have been added to the site in the past 15 years. Ancestry users have created more than 28 million family trees containing over 2.8 billion profiles. Ancestry.com has local Web sites directed at nine countries that help people discover, preserve and share their family history, including its flagship Web site at www.ancestry.com.

Forward-Looking Statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those anticipated by these forward-looking statements. Such risks and uncertainties include our continuing ability to acquire, digitize and make desired content conveniently available to our subscribers.Information concerning additional factors that could cause events or results to differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements is contained under the caption "Risk Factors" in our Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2011, and in discussions in other of our Securities and Exchange Commission filings. These forward-looking statements should not be relied upon as representing our views as of any subsequent date and we assume no obligation to publicly update or revise these forward-looking statements.

IRISH NEWSPAPER ARCHIVE

It’s a subscription website (subscribe for a day, week, month, or year), but a free search is available:

Welcome to Irish Newspaper Archive - the world's largest online database of Irish Newspapers. Search, retrieve and view Ireland's past exactly as it was originally published. With many of Ireland's leading national, regional and out of print titles, this website is a wonderful resource for novice historians and academic institutes.

As our archive ranges from the 1700's to present it takes in many of the seminal moments in the development of New World countries such as Australia, Canada and the United States, to name but a few. The national newspapers give a unique perspective on national and international events through the Irish news press, whilst the local titles are a wonderful resource for all those interested in genealogical research and local history investigations.

LINK

ICON

This site (International Coalition on Newspapers) maintains an international list of newspaper digitization projects:

LINK

CHRONICLING AMERICA DIGITIZED NEWSPAPERS (1836-1922)

Finding aid of newspapers available on Library of Congress’s Chronicling America website:

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Tuesday, December 06, 2011

HISTORICAL NEWSPAPERS ONLINE

University of Pennsylvania’s list of American newspapers available online:

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GOOGLE NEWS ARCHIVE SOURCES LIST

A list of all the newspapers available in the Google News Archive:

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GET YOUR GADGETS!

You may know them as widgets--Microsoft offers some free ones:

LINK

MICROSOFT DOWNLOADS

Sure, Microsoft wants to sell you stuff—-it’s a corporation, after all. They do offer a surprising amount of fairly nice free stuff, however (for Windows 7, Windows Vista, and Windows XP):

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OUR BLOG

The blog itself is interesting and informative, but they may wish to sponsor a Give Our Blog a Better Name contest:

The blog of the Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center:

LINK

Monday, December 05, 2011

ONLINE NEWSPAPER ARCHIVES

Wikipedia list of online newspaper archives:

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FAMILY WE SEARCH

Don’t know if you’re aware of this site. The site owner (Kathy Wieland) is a St. Louis area local who does genie research in local courthouses. She also offers school yearbooks, church jubilee books, family histories, and local histories for sale. Just use Missouri (or other state name) as your keyword:

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AMERICAN CIVIL WAR UNITS FILE

Need help researching a Union or Confederate military unit (all states)? A knowledgeable volunteer may be available who can offer you research tips and other helpful info:

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KINDLE FIRE vs. NOOK TABLET

Don’t know which to purchase for yourself or as a Christmas gift? Like so many decisions we’re called upon to make, that depends…

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Friday, December 02, 2011

REMEMBER PEARL HARBOR!

Ancestry.com wants to help you commemorate Pearl Harbor and other events of World War II. All of its WWII databases can be searched for free now through 7 December 2011:

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FOOBAR 2000

Yes, the name's a little weird, but if you just need a lightweight music player that can handle more than a dozen audio formats, this free application may be all that you need:

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MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR SERVICE RECORDS

Now available on Fold3.com:

The U.S.-Mexican War determined the southwest border of the United States as we know it today. Fighting began after the 1845 annexation of Texas and ended with the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo on February 2, 1848. The territory gained would ultimately become the states of California, Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, Utah, Texas, and Colorado, with portions contributing to Wyoming and Kansas.

Mexican War Service Records contain valuable first-hand information about battles, troop movements, officers, and soldiers. While the United States had a standing army at the time, most of the soldiers who fought in the Mexican War were volunteers from various states. At present, there are five sets of records on Fold3 with information on forty-four units, and the men who served in them, from Mississippi, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, and the Mormon Battalion.

Muster Rolls provide details on Promotions, Payments, Casualties, Those killed in battle and Deserters, as well as Physical descriptions. Unit information includes company muster rolls naming recruits, deserters, and those on special assignment; and regimental returns with battle histories and casualties. Company locations—the National Palace Mexico, Lobas Island in the Gulf of Mexico, and Camp nr. Jalapa Mexico—provide geographic perspectives.

Other titles on Fold3 round out the Mexican War Collection. If you're interested in a Pennsylvania soldier, alphabetical service record abstracts in the Pennsylvania Archives match the imaged service record cards within the state's two regiments. For Mormon Battalion soldiers, you can pair service records with the Mormon Battalion Pension Files.

Explore the Mexican War Service Records to learn more about the men who served in this geographically critical war.

OUR MILITARY HERITAGE

An online service offered by the Allen County Public Library. They’re providing biographical sketches, unit rosters, letters and diaries, photographs, and other documents for American wars from colonial times to the present day. Emphasis is Indiana regiments and veterans, but there is plenty of information on military units and soldiers from other states:

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NOTE: Many photos of gravestones of soldiers who were killed in action.

OTHER STATES RESOURCES

Allen County Public Library doesn’t just provide information on Indiana counties and ancestors—it’s got a lot of great information on various other states, too:

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GENEALOGY GEMS

Not subscribing to this newsletter from the Allen County Public Library? Why not? It's chock full of great information, it’s easy to subscribe to—-and it’s free:

LINK

NOTE: Click on Genealogy Community on the top line, then EZine.

MISSOURI HISTORY MUSEUM UPDATE

The following sources have recently been added to the Genealogy and Local History Index:

1. Foto Feature, 1959 (includes photographs of African American children who were students at LesPierrettes School of Dance)

2. Bench and Bar of Missouri Scrapbooks, circa 1880s-1960s

3. Directory of the Carondelet Presbyterian Church, 1886

4. Historical Sketch, Reports and Directory of Carondelet Presbyterian Church, 1892

5. Directory of Cabanne Methodist Episcopal Church, South, 1906

SEARCH THE GENEALOGY & LOCAL HISTORY INDEX

Here's a list of the sources they're currently indexing. As they're completed, they'll be added to the Genealogy and Local History Index.

1. Who's Who in Missouri: A Compilation of Biographical Information on Outstanding Citizens of the State of Missouri, 1974

2. Missouri Pacific Lines Magazine, 1942-1965

3. Union Electric Magazine, 1913-1960s

4. Roster of the Department of Missouri, Grand Army of the Republic, and Its Auxiliaries, 1895

5. Weick Brothers Undertaking Company Records, 1911-1968

6. Independent Evangelical Protestant Church Record Book of Marriages, 1884-1903

7. Normandy Courier (Normandy High School newsletter), 1937-1958 (incomplete run)

8. Medical Scrapbooks (includes articles and obituaries mostly regarding St. Louis doctors), circa 1910s-1960s

9. St. Louis Police Department annual reports, 1870s-1940s

FEATURED TITLE: WWII DIARIES

Experience the battles of Midway, Guadalcanal, the Coral Sea, and countless smaller naval encounters in World War II as only those in the midst of the fighting could.

The WWII War Diaries on Fold3 are daily operational journals created by various naval commands of the U.S. Navy, providing first-hand accounts by the commanders of the ships that saw action. Reports from December 7, 1941 to December 31, 1945 originally marked as "secret" and "confidential" now offer important historical and strategic perspectives relating to the war at sea.

This collection of over a million document images tells the story of a critical era in naval history. Examples of what you may find include:

• Bomb damage report of the USS Yorktown after Coral Sea
• Whale sightings originally mistaken for enemy subs
• Rescue of pilot at sea
• Personnel transfers
• Organizational chart for Marine Corps amphibious operations

War patrol reports can be riveting reading detailing a ship's hour-by-hour activities while at sea. For instance, the Report of the Fifth War Patrol, by the commander of the submarine USS Pogy describes firing torpedoes near Midway in the early hours of February 10, 1944. A Pogy torpedo hit a freighter and "a tremendous tongue of flame shot 500 feet in the air. We could feel the heat of it on the bridge, and by its glare we became instantly visible to an admiring multitude of Japanese." The commander commends the men aboard, yet says there are "too many dull-eyed seamen and firemen who cannot be pushed up into petty officer ratings and who have difficulty even in qualifying in submarines."

Although some reports are handwritten, many typed reports and diaries are OCR searchable. Browse or search on a battle location or keyword, or on the name of a person, Navy ship, aircraft, fleet, or unit of command. Although you'll find many abbreviations The World War II War Diaries description includes a list to help you decipher them.

According to the National Archives, war diaries were identified by the Navy in 1944 as "the principal means by which the day-to-day experience of the Navy is recorded for current study and future historical use." We're pleased to further this mission at Fold3:

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IMPACT EARTH

This simulator can predict the damage likely when a projectile of a certain size, composition, speed, and angle of impact hits the earth:

LINK

NOTE: Needless to say, you don’t want anything really good-sized to wallop the earth, as the damage from wind sheer, earth tremors, tsumanis, and crater ejecta can be catastrophic to say the least…