YOU ARE VISITOR:

You are visitor:

Thanks for stopping by!

Monday, October 31, 2011

WHY DIDN’T HE JUST WADE ACROSS?

Why didn’t Ambrose Burnside just wade across Antietam Creek at a shallow point? Because crossing it with an army is a much more difficult proposition than is crossing a man, or even a regiment:

LINK

THE LOCAL NEWS

What do people use their local TV news stations for? The weather, breaking news stories, and traffic updates—in that order. Where do they get most of their local news? From newspapers, oddly enough—although usually not in those large printed versions some of you may remember:

LINK

PREROGATIVE COURT OF THE CANTERBURY WILLS

One of the most important record series the National Archives (UK) makes available to family historians is the Prerogative Court of Canterbury Wills, which spans almost 500 years and contains over 1 million wills. The wills are free to search, with a small fee to download a digital copy:

LINK

Friday, October 28, 2011

SHOEBOXOLOGY AT THE MIDWEST GENEALOGY CENTER

Discover the Family Secrets Hidden in Your Shoebox with Shoeboxology!

1000 Memories, an affiliate of the Internet Archives, is offering a free scanning session at the Midwest Genealogy Center in Independence, Missouri, on November 19, 2011. The event starts with a class entitled, “Genealogy Clues In Your Family Shoebox” at 1:00 pm, followed by a tutorial on how to use the 1000 Memories website (a free password-protected website for sharing your genealogy) at 1:45 pm. Finally, you can scan your photos and documents from 2-4 p.m. with unlimited scanning. 1000 Memories premiered their site at the FGS Conference in Springfield in September.

Don’t miss out on this free opportunity! Call the library at 816-252-7228 for more information. Learn more about 1000 Memories on their website.

Thursday, October 27, 2011

THE HONG KONG COLONIAL CEMETERY

Free podcast available on the National Archives (UK) website:

LINK

THE BOYS OF WAR

Boys under 18 years of age served on both sides during the Civil War. Many served as drummer boys, musicians, or messengers, but some served in the lines as combat soldiers:

LINK

THE NEARLY PAPERLESS OFFICE

Let’s face it—you can’t totally eliminate paper documents from your life. That said, you most certainly can drastically reduce the amount of paper that you currently must deal with:

LINK

WELCOME TO THE CENTRE FOR BATTLEFIELD ARCHAEOLOGY

Ah, if only this academic program at the University of Glasgow had existed when I was deciding what to do when I grew up:

LINK

ALTON IN THE CIVIL WAR

Information on the Alton (IL) Civil War Prison, with a searchable database of persons confined there:

LINK

ANCESTRY.COM ADDS MORE THAN 50 MILLION BIRTH, MARRIAGE, AND DEATH RECORDS

New Collections from 23 States include records on famous Americans like John Wayne, Clark Gable and Ernest Hemingway

PROVO, UTAH – (October 27, 2011) – Ancestry.com, the world’s largest online family history resource, today announced it has added 53 new historical vital record collections to its nearly half billion U.S. vital records, the largest searchable online collection of its kind. The foundation of family history research, civil vital records – recordings of births, marriages and deaths – were typically created at or near the time of the event and serve as an essential resource for the millions of Americans who are beginning or continuing their family history research. The new additions encompass 23 states, include more than 50 million historical records dating from the 1600s (some of the oldest U.S. records available) through to 2010 and have been made available through partnerships with state and local archives, county offices and newspapers. Many notable Americans can be found in the collections, including John Wayne, Ernest Hemingway, Clark Gable, Spencer Tracy, Judy Garland and many more.

Interesting facts presented by these records include John Wayne’s birth name as Marion Robert Morrison, changed to the legendary stage name when he began working in Hollywood. “Gone with the Wind” star Clark Gable hailed from the small village of Cadiz, Ohio according to the Ohio Births and Christening Index (1800-1962). The Minnesota Birth and Christening Records (1840-1980) show that “The Wizard of Oz” star Judy Garland’s given birth name was Frances Gumm.

These new vital record collections are available to all current Ancestry.com subscribers and can be found at www.ancestry.com/vitals. As always, Ancestry.com is free of charge for 14 days to all new users.

Vital records contain a wide variety of valuable information. Birth records can include information about baptisms and christenings, as well as birth certificates and registers. Marriage records tend to be the oldest vital records and can include consent affidavits - typically for individuals under legal age, declarations of intent, banns, bonds, contracts, licenses, certificates, registers and returns. Death records may include death certificates, burial records, cemetery records, and other documents such as probate records, court minutes, and coroner's records.

Traditionally, vital records in the U.S. have been created and maintained locally by multiple entities—churches, town clerks, justices of the peace and others. With no single source for information, research has previously been time intensive, requiring countless hours and travel to make and confirm discoveries.

With the digitization of millions of these valuable records, Ancestry.com has simplified the process to a click of a mouse and keyboard. Interest and curiosity in family history research is growing rapidly, evidenced by a recent Harris Interactive survey that revealed four in five Americans are interested in learning about their family history and three out of four claiming that knowing their family history is important to them.[1]

“Vital records are among the most valuable genealogical resources for proving or disproving other sources, giving a more complete picture of ancestors, helping distinguish between different people with the same names and finding clues about earlier life events,” said Tennessee Secretary of State Tre Hargett, whose office oversees the Tennessee State Library and Archives. “By compiling such a massive collection, spanning not only different locales, but centuries of essential information, Ancestry.com is making it possible for anyone to learn more about family history.”

Some of the new vital record collections now available on Ancestry.com date well back into the 17th Century including:

• Connecticut, Deaths and Burials, 1650-1934: Town clerks began recording births, marriages and deaths by 1650. These records are derived from microfilmed records of deaths and burials. This collection includes legendary names such as P.T. Barnum of circus fame and dictionary pioneer Noah Webster.
• Maryland, Births and Christenings, 1662–1911: This collection is extracted from more than 200,000 Maryland birth, baptism, and christening records sourced from church, civil and family records. This collection includes the birth of John Hanson, President of early America’s Continental Congress.
• New Hampshire, Death and Burial Records, 1654–1949: New Hampshire’s earliest records were in the mid-1600s, though laws requiring a statewide compilation of records were not passed until 1866.
• New Hampshire, Marriage Records, 1637–1947: Records in this collection are derived from certificates of intention of marriage and certificates of marriage for more recent years.
• New Jersey, Births and Christenings, 1660–1931: This collection is comprised of more than 2.3 million birth, baptism, and christening records. Information found here may include name, gender, race and birthplace.

“The United States possesses a unique history and vital records offer an accurate, in-depth look into the lives of individuals, families and the nation as a whole,” said Josh Hanna, Executive Vice President, Ancestry.com. “Ancestry.com is committed to the continued expansion of our vital record collections and increasing the breadth of information for all Americans looking to learn more about their past.”

Tuesday, October 25, 2011

NAPOLEON’S NIGHTMARE

Russian winter was no picnic, either...

Guerrilla warfare is nothing new. Napoleon encountered it in Spain starting in 1808, after he betrayed the Spanish monarch, who had just helped him conquer Portugal:

LINK

BEHAVING DURING THE BLITZ

Did Liverpudlians mind their manners during the World War II blitz? This free podcast uses case studies from police records to help answer that question:

LINK

CASTLE GARDEN

CastleGarden.org is an educational project of The Battery Conservancy. This free site offers access to an extraordinary database of information on 11 million immigrants from 1820 through 1892, the year Ellis Island opened. Over 100 million Americans can trace their ancestors to this early immigration period:

LINK

TOP 100 WEBSITES AT YOUR FINGERTIPS

This list is a bit dated, perhaps--but the convenience can't be beat:

In 2010, PC Magazine created its list of the Top 100 Websites. They also created a Favorites Installer that will automatically add the Top 100 to Internet Explorer or Firefox:

LINK

NOTHING SUCCEEDS LIKE DEFEAT

His raid was a tactical debacle—his followers nearly to a man were killed, wounded, or captured. He was himself hanged shortly thereafter. But he got what he really wanted anyway: a bloody civil war that freed millions of slaves in this country:

LINK

Monday, October 24, 2011

IT’S IN THE BAG

The body bag was a product of necessity—the Civil War produced lots of bodies that needed to be shipped home:

LINK

BAPTISM OF FIRE

The men of the 44th Missouri Infantry Regiment were combat virgins—until the Battle of Franklin, Tennessee, that is, when the men of the regiment found themselves occupying the exact spot where Confederates under Major General John Brown repeatedly attempted to break through the Union line:

LINK

STEVE JOBS AND OUR INNOVATION NATION

Post on the Government Book Talk blog about Jobs and the role the GPO has played as incubator of innovation:

LINK

NOTE: My own Apple story: I was running a small public library in South Dakota in the early 1980s, and we had just bought an Apple IIe for the library. After it was set up for us, I walked back to the library that night in a snowstorm (I walked because cars were banned from the streets during the storm) in order to use the Apple IIe. A fairly dumb thing to do? Of course—but this story certainly serves as a testament to the strength of the Apple brand even in those early days of its ascendency!

What, by the way, was I doing with that Apple IIe as the snow piled up against the library doors? Why, I was playing games—we had purchased several Infocom titles, and Murder By the Dozen, as I recall..

THE CASE OF THE DISAPPEARING DOCUMENTS

Federal investigators think a long-time document collector of presidential memorabilia and his associate may have “borrowed” thousands of historical documents from archives all along the East Coast:

LINK

2012 CIVIL WAR INSTITUTE

If you’re a Civil War nut (or inadvertently married one), this will likely be of interest:

DATES: June 22-26, 2012

Speakers:

Brooks Simpson - U. S. Grant and Shiloh

Peter Carmichael - Stonewall Jackson’s execution of deserters

Allen Guelzo - General McClellan’s Coup

Susannah Ural - The destruction of Hood’s Texas Brigade at Antietam

Caroline Janney - How Americans have remembered emancipation

Battlefield tours:

Fredericksburg
Walk along the Sunken Road at Marye’s Heights

Second Manassas
Examine Stonewall Jackson’s defense along the famous Unfinished Railroad

Antietam
Explore the Cornfield, Bloody Lane, and Burnside Bridge

War College Staff Ride of Antietam
Study the battlefield from the perspective of the modern U.S. military

Find out more about the 2012 CWI Conference including registration information:

LINK

Friday, October 21, 2011

THE DEVIL IN MASSACHUSETTS

This well-done account of the Salem witch trials is available full-text online:

LINK

AN INSTITUTION TO WHICH THE NAME HOSPITAL SHOULD NOT BE APPLIED

Many of the UK military hospitals covered in this 1902 report would more likely kill than cure you:

LINK

BRITISH MILITARY HOSPITALS IN 1899

A complete list, with number of beds each:

LINK

CLASSIC SHELL

If you’re currently running Windows 7 or Windows Vista, but miss the look and feel of Windows XP, Classic Shell can make you believe you’ve got Windows XP up and running once again:

LINK

GENEALOGY SOFTWARE SMACKDOWN

Before you buy genealogy software, check this Wikipedia comparison chart to see which application best suits your needs. You may also find that a free application does most or all of the jobs that need doing:

LINK

DEATH ON THE DARK RIVER

In late April 1865, a steamboat filled with recently freed Union Army POWs blew up—with tragic results:

LINK

THE RIVER KWAI RECORDER

He risked torture and execution in order to compile a list of prisoners forced by the Japanese to help construct the infamous Burma Thai Railroad:

LINK

Wednesday, October 19, 2011

THE REBELS ARE OUR COUNTRYMEN AGAIN

If you're lucky enough to live within commuting distance, or will happen to be in the Gettysburg area on November 19th, this sounds like a fantastic program:

Dear CWI Friend,

We are pleased that Joan Waugh, Professor of History at UCLA, will present the 2011 Fortenbaugh Lecture at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, November 19th, at the Majestic Theater in Gettysburg. Waugh's lecture, '"The Rebels are Our Countrymen Again': U.S. Grant and the Meaning of Appomattox" will reexamine the familiar story of the historic surrender of Confederate forces to Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant on April 9, 1865 at Appomattox Courthouse, Virginia. The surrender at Appomattox is generally considered the end of the American Civil War, enshrining a powerful image of a peaceful, perfectly conducted closure to the bloody conflict. Yet the details of Grant's magnanimous surrender document provoked debate, anger, and opposition among the Northern public.
.
Prior to the Fortenbaugh Lecture there will be two book discussions: November 10th at 7:00 p.m. with Professor Peter Carmichael and on November 18th at 4:00 p.m. with Joan Waugh, focusing on Waugh's book U.S. Grant: American Hero, American Myth (University of North Carolina Press, 2009). The book is available at a discounted price of $25.00 at the Gettysburg College bookstore and both events will be held in the Lyceum of Pennsylvania Hall on the college campus.

Preceding the start of Waugh's lecture on November 19th, the $5,000 Michael Shaara Prize for Excellence in Civil War Fiction will be awarded to Robin Oliveira for her novel, My Name is Mary Sutter (Penguin, 2010). The prize has been awarded at the Fortenbaugh Lecture since 2005.

To read Joan Waugh's biography, learn more about the Fortenbaugh Lecture and the Shaara Prize, and/or see a full schedule of activities go here.

Hope to see you on November 19th!

Best,

Peter S. Carmichael, Director
Civil War Institute

MY ENEMY, MY LOVE

David Fiedler’s new novel, My Enemy, My Love tells the story of a German POW, a professor drafted against his will into the army in the last months of the war. Captured and sent to the U.S., the prisoner finds romance with an American woman on the farm where he and others are working. Their love is dangerous for both, and the novel’s climax comes as they are pursued by both Nazi POWs who suspect him of being disloyal, and an American guard who desires a relationship with the same girl. It is based on a true stories told to Fiedler by people who lived them.

“Readers who enjoy historical fiction will definitely find fascination in this book, set against the backdrop of little-known chapter of WWII history here in Missouri,” said Fiedler, who is based in St. Louis. “It definitely has a romantic angle, but fortunately there are gun fights, a chase scene and some menacing Nazis to help even it out.”

Few people know that the United States held over 400,000 stateside German and Italian prisoners of war during World War II. The prisoners were located in a number of camps around the country, and their work in field and factory in close proximity to the Americans gave many people a new understanding of the “enemy.” These men were treated well and had opportunities to take part in sports and music in the camps, and in the years following the war many recalled their time in the States with fondness.

To order copies or for more information on this book or Fiedler’s other projects, please visit davefiedler.com. My Enemy, My Love is also available on Kindle. For questions, please call (314) 956-7353 or email MoPOWs@aol.com

My Enemy, My Love is a thrilling, roller coaster ride of love, action and suspense. You won’t be able to put this down.”

-Charlie Brennan, KMOX Radio, St. Louis

I KNOW THEY’RE IN THERE SOMEWHERE!

If you’re having trouble finding files on your computer, perhaps it’s because you’re organizing and naming your digital materials as if they were analog objects. They’re not, however—and that means a different organization scheme and different file-naming protocols are quite probably in order:

LINK

DIGITAL WORLD WAR II UNIT HISTORIES

These histories of WWII military units are available full-text on the Hathi Trust website:

Second to None: the History of the 305th Infantry in WWII History of the 313th Infantry in WWII

History of the 12th Infantry Regiment in WWII

History of the 3rd Infantry Division in WWII

Battle Babies: the Story of the 99th Infantry Division in WWII

Ours to Hold It High: the History of the 77th Infantry Division in WWII

All can be accessed from this page.

Monday, October 17, 2011

WHO’S SORRY NOW?

Soldiers who faced combat during the Civil War were generally able to “forgive and forget” in fairly short order; soldiers who were confined in Civil War prisons often had a much more difficult time doing so:

LINK

GENERAL GRANT'S LAST YEAR

While facing crushing debt and untreatable throat cancer, Ulysses S. Grant labored mightily to finish the memoirs that would save his wife, Julia, from the poorhouse:

LINK

HISTORICAL U.S. COUNTY BOUNDARIES

I took a look and Randy’s site really does look promising:

Hello,

Your genealogical society members may find this free new Historical U.S. County Boundaries interactive map tool useful in their researches:

A write-up on recent enhancements can be found here.

Thank you for your consideration of including a mention of this tool in an upcoming newsletter or blog post.

All the best,
Randy Majors

WITCHING FOR NOT-SO-WARM BODIES

Joy Neighbors knew she could "witch" for water--could she do the same for graves?

LINK

OFFICE TIMELINE

If you’ve got PowerPoint 2007 or 2010, this powerful free add-on creates beautiful timelines in minutes:

LINK

Thursday, October 13, 2011

NPRC NEWS

National Personnel Records Center has opened its new facility at Hwy 367 and Dunn Road in north St. Louis County, and they will be holding a dedication ceremony on 15 October 2011:

LINK

There’s a nicely done history of NPRC here:

LINK

LECTURE CHANGE AT MISSOURI HISTORY MUSEUM

Marie Concannon was scheduled to give a lecture on Saturday, October 15, at 10:30am titled "Finding Ancestors in Federal Depository Library Collections." This lecture has been cancelled. In its place, Missouri History Museum associate archivist Dennis Northcott will be giving the following lecture:

Government Documents in the Missouri History Museum Archives

Although the Missouri History Museum Archives was never an official repository for government records, over the years the archives has acquired a variety of local government records, dating from the colonial era to the early 20th century. Associate Archivist Dennis Northcott will show examples of many of these genealogically valuable records.

When: Saturday, October 15, 2011, 10:30 am
Where: AT&T Foundation Multipurpose Room, Missouri History Museum in Forest Park
How much: Free; reservations are not required.

Questions: Email Dennis Northcott or call him at 314-746-4517.

SIGIL

Have you written a book, or has your society published a book? You can increase sales/exposure by publishing it as e-book. How do you convert your manuscript to an e-book? This free program can do all the heavy lifting for you:

LINK

MAKE YOUR OWN APPS

Did you know that there are apps for making apps?

LINK

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

CONGRATULATIONS!

Chris Merseal, CG(SM), is among the newest associates of the Board for Certification of Genealogists (BCG). Chris works at Jefferson County Library, High Ridge Branch.

LINK

2012 CIVIL WAR INSTITUTE

Speakers include:

Brooks Simpson - U. S. Grant and Shiloh

Peter Carmichael - Stonewall Jackson’s execution of deserters

Allen Guelzo - General McClellan’s Coup

Susannah Ural - The destruction of Hood’s Texas Brigade at Antietam

Caroline Janney - How Americans have remembered emancipation

Battlefield tours include:

Fredericksburg
Walk along the Sunken Road at Marye’s Heights

Second Manassas
Examine Stonewall Jackson’s defense along the famous Unfinished Railroad

Antietam
Explore the Cornfield, Bloody Lane, and Burnside Bridge

War College Staff Ride of Antietam
Study the battlefield from the perspective of the modern U.S. military

Find out more about the 2012 CWI Conference including registration information:

LINK

LOOKING FOR BRITS?

This guide on the National Archives (UK) website discusses the types of records available at that institution for persons who worked at particular occupations:

LINK

For instance, was your ancestor given the choice of relocating to the Colonies or being hung by his or her neck until dead? There’s a record for that:

LINK

SEARCHING FOR BRITISH RECORDS IN THE NEW FAMILYSEARCH WEBSITE

Free podcast available on the National Archives (UK) website:

LINK

Tuesday, October 11, 2011

1904 WORLD'S FAIR NEWS

University of Missouri Digital Library has digitized numerous important World's Fair publications, including World's Fair Bulletin (1901-1905) and History of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition by Mark Bennitt (1905).

LINK

NOTE: Scroll down to Text Collections and click on The Louisiana Purchase Exposition: the 1904 St. Louis World's Fair.

WHY BISMARCK LOVED LINCOLN

Lincoln wasn’t the only world leader then attempting to unify and centralize a nation:

LINK

WINSTEP NEXUS

A great free alternative if you need to organize your desktop (or just need a change of scene on your desktop):

LINK

OPENWITH ENHANCED

If you’ve ever tried to open a program in Windows, and been flummoxed by the process, get Openwith Enhanced (free program). It helps you figure out which program to use to open it—and gives you a link to its website if you don’t have that program installed as yet:

LINK

FINDING YOUR FAMILY HISTORY: GENEALOGY FAIR AT NARA-KC

On Saturday, October 15 the National Archives at Kansas City will host Finding Your Family History, a day-long genealogy fair featuring workshops and local genealogical organizations onsite. Below is a schedule of workshops. Attendees are asked to select either the morning or afternoon session.

Morning

8:00 - 8:30 a.m. -- Registration
8:30 - 9:30 a.m. -- Session Choices: Introduction to Alien Files (A-Files) or Introduction to Genealogy
9:30 - 9:45 a.m. -- break/vendors
9:45 - 10:45 a.m. -- Session Choices: Naturalization Records; or Military Records; or African American Genealogy
10:45 - 11:00 a.m. - break/vendors
11:00 - Noon -- Session Choices: Preservation for Genealogists; or The 1940 Census; or Introduction to Fold3 (formerly Footnote.com)

Afternoon

12:30 - 1:00 p.m. -- Registration
1:00 - 2:00 p.m. -- Session Choices: Introduction to Alien Files (A-Files) or Introduction to Genealogy
2:00 - 2:15 p.m. -- break/vendors
2:15 - 3:15 p.m. -- Session Choices: Naturalization Records; or The 1940 Census; or African American Genealogy
3:15 - 3:30 p.m. -- break/vendors
3:30 - 4:30 p.m. -- Session Choices: Preservation for Genealogists; or Military Records; or Introduction to Fold3 (formerly Footnote.com)

Seating is limited and reservations are required. To make a reservation for this free event, call 816-268-8072 or email kimberlee.ried@nara.gov. This event is presented in partnership with Kansas City Public Television.

About the speakers:

Jennifer Audsley-Moore has been with the National Archives for five years, first as a preservation contractor then as an archives technician. In addition to handling reference inquires, Audsley-Moore is responsible for the National Archives at Kansas City volunteer program. She has bachelor and master degrees in American History.

Evie Bresette is a Certified Genealogist with the Board for Certification of Genealogists and a member of the Association of Professional Genealogists and its affiliate local chapter, Heartland APG; and attended the National Institute for Genealogical Research in Washington DC. She has presented lectures at national and local conferences and has volunteered at the National Archives-Central Plains Region since 1993. Evie belongs to many national genealogical associations and serves on the Nominating Committee for the Board of the Missouri State Genealogical Association; she specializes in heir searching and due diligence.

Elizabeth Burnes is an Archivist for the National Archives at Kansas City. She serves as the lead archivist for Alien Files (A-Files) reference. Prior to joining the National Archives staff she held positions at Harry S Truman National Historic Site, Missouri History Museum, Herman T. Pott National Inland Waterways Library, and Harry S. Truman Presidential Library and Museum. She received a bachelor’s degree in History at Truman State University, and a master’s degree in History and Museum Studies at the University of Missouri-St. Louis.

Joyce Burner joined the archives staff in 2010 as archivist, after working as the preservation contractor in Lee’s Summit in 2009. After spending thirty years in school and church libraries and book retail, Joyce returned to graduate school in 2007 to study archives management, and interned at the National Archives at Kansas City and the Harry S. Truman Presidential Library. Joyce writes Archival Research Catalog descriptions of our records for the NARA website, and is supervisor over preservation and internships.

Jessica Edgar, a graduate in History and Education from William Jewell College, has been with the National Archives at Kansas City since 2007. As an Archives Specialist, her roles include: providing reference services to genealogists, historians, and scholars; physically controlling and managing the databases related to the region’s 50,000 cubic feet of records; creating and designing print and web-based marketing materials; and assisting with K-12 educational outreach.

Trevor Plante is an archivist in the Textual Reference Section at the National Archives and Records Administration in Washington, DC, who specializes in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century military records. He is an active lecturer at the National Archives and a frequent contributor to Prologue. He compiled Reference Information Paper 109, Military Service Records at the National Archives, and is a contributing author in the Encyclopedia of American Military History. He co-authored “Lincoln’s Fleeting Hope for an Early End to the War,” which appeared in America’s Civil War magazine.His other published works include: “The Shady Side of the Family Tree: Civil War Union Court-Martial Case Files;” “U.S. Marines in the Boxer Rebellion;” and “Researching African Americans in the U.S. Army, 1866-1890: Buffalo Soldiers and Black Infantrymen.” He is a guest lecturer at the United States Naval Academy and the U.S. Marine Corps Command and Staff College.

Constance Potter is a reference archivist at the National Archives and Records Administration Washington, DC. She writes and speaks about federal records of interest to genealogists including federal census records, Laura Ingalls Wilder, World War I graves registration and Gold Star Mothers, the effects of weather on family history, and women during the Revolutionary War era. She is working on the reference aspects of the 1940 census. Potter has worked at the National Archives since 1983.

Dorothy Witherspoon, Ph.D. is a native Arkansan and began an interest in genealogy and researching family history in the 1980s inspired by Alex Haley's Roots. In 1990 she published The Homecoming, a book about her family’s history, which is now in its second printing. Her recently published book, Researching Slave Ancestry, is designed to help African American families explore and discover their roots. Dr. Witherspoon is a founding member of the Midwest African American Genealogical Interest Coalition (MAGIC). She resides in the Kansas City, Missouri area.

The National Archives at Kansas City is home to more than 50,000 cubic feet of historical records dating from the 1820s to the 1990s created or received by nearly 100 Federal agencies. Serving the Central Plains Region, the archives holds records from the states of Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota available for public access. The facility is located at 400 West Pershing Road, Kansas City, MO 64108. It is open to the public Tuesday-Saturday 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. for research, with the exhibits open from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. For more information, call 816-268-8000 or visit: www.archives.gov/central-plains.

Saturday, October 08, 2011

SPECIAL FGS DISCOUNT FOR ROOTSTECH 2012

Special FGS Discount for RootsTech 2012 Available for Three Days Only!

Thanks to our society's association with FGS, RootsTech is extending a very attractive discounted rate of $99 for three days only to any members of our society who would like to participate in this one-of-a-kind, dynamic conference in Salt Lake City, Utah.

RootsTech is a leading edge conference designed to bring technologists together with genealogists, so they can learn from each other and find solutions to the challenges they face in family history research today. More than 3,000 people attended the inaugural conference in 2011 and their feedback on RootsTech was overwhelmingly positive. Don't miss out in 2012!

Take advantage of the special $99 registration rate and we look forward to seeing you at RootsTech 2012!

• A new family history and technology conference
• February 2-4, 2012
• Salt Palace Convention Center, Salt Lake City, Utah
• FGS registration discount is available October 27 to 29
• Use the promotion code FGS when registering to receive the FGS discount rate

At RootsTech, genealogists and family historians of all skill levels will learn technology-based solutions to accelerate their research. From the Expo Hall and participant-driven unconferencing discussions to the RootsTech Playground, this conference is ground-breaking and unique. Check out rootstech.org for the most current information.

Be one of the thousands of RootsTech 2012 attendees to:

• Experience hands-on workshops and interactive classes to accelerate your research
• Help influence the future of genealogy
• Learn and share new ways to adapt technologies to genealogy
• Help leading-edge technology providers better understand your needs

Participate in panels, product demos and many networking opportunities
There will be sessions of interest to novices through advanced technology users, including:

• Hands-on workshops
• Sneak peek demonstrations of new products and services
• Interactive presentations and panels
• Unconferencing discussions (last minute, on-the-fly sessions by attendees)

Go here to see the full list of topics and sessions.

Register here between October 27-29, 2011 and use the promotion code FGS to receive the $99 rate.

• $99 FGS promotion rate October 27-29, 2011
• $129 Early bird rate until November 30, 2011
• $189 beginning December 2011

RootsTech is sponsored by Microsoft, Dell, FamilySearch, Oracle, the National Genealogical Society, brightsolid, Ancestry.com, the Federation of Genealogical Societies, the New England Historic Genealogical Society, Archives.com, Brigham Young University, and the Association of Professional Genealogists.

Tuesday, October 04, 2011

PRO EJECT

Hopefully you realize that removing a USB drive should involve more than merely yanking it from the computer. Proeject makes sure the job is done right—and does it with little help from you:

LINK

THE DOCTORS WHO KILLED A PRESIDENT

An assassin shot President James A. Garfield, but historian Candice Millard demonstrates in convincing fashion how the efforts of his spectacularly inept doctors prevented his likely recovery from a non-mortal wound:

LINK

WEEBLY

Need to create a free website and/or blog? Weebly is an option you should consider:

LINK

NGS 2012 FAMILY HISTORY CONFERENCE

Yes, I know—you’ve barely settled in from your trip to FGS Conference 2011 in Springfield, Illinois. It’s time, however, to start thinking about conferences in 2012. NGS Conference 2012 will be held in Cincinnati, Ohio (9-12- May 2012) at the Duke Energy Convention Center. Conference hotels include the Hyatt Regency Cincinnati; Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza; and the Millennium Hotel.

More info? Go here.

Monday, October 03, 2011

GETTYSBURG GATHERING

If you can make it to Gettysburg on November 4-6, 2011, you can sign on for a weekend full of battlefield tours and rubbing elbows with fellow Civil War nuts:

LINK

MILITARY HISTORY ONLINE

Got an interest in some aspect of military history? I guarantee you—there will be something of interest here:

LINK

WASHINGTON COUNTY (MO) COURT RECORDS

The Missouri History Museum Archives holds a collection of Washington County, Missouri, court records dated 1788-1851 (the bulk of the documents are dated 1810s-1820s). Among these documents are accounts, debts, receipts, agreements, petitions, and indentures.

To request a look-up of a name in the index to these court records, contact Dennis Northcott at archives@mohistory.org.

GENEALOGY & LOCAL HISTORY INDEX UPDATE

The following sources have recently been added to the Missouri History’s Museum’s Genealogy & Local History Index:

1. Necrology Scrapbook, Volume 12 (obituaries dated 1922-1924)

2. House Tour of St. Louis West End Private Places, 1972

3. Yeatman Life (Yeatman High School yearbooks), 1907-1925 (incomplete run)

4. List of Officers and Employees of the City of St. Louis, 1891

5. List of Officers and Employees of the City of St. Louis, 1899

Genealogy & Local History Index

UPCOMING CLASSES AT MISSOURI HISTORY MUSEUM

Finding Ancestors in Federal Depository Library Collections (with Marie Concannon, University of Missouri Library)

Marie Concannon will give strategies for researchers who would like to search Federal Depository Library Program collections for clues about their ancestors.

When: Saturday, October 15, 2011, 10:30 am
Where: Missouri History Museum in Forest Park
How much: Free; reservations are not required.

Preserving Family Documents

Do you have old family photographs, letters, diaries, or other precious items that you would like to preserve? Our Missouri History Museum experts will provide tips on how to preserve these family treasures for future generations.

When: Monday, October 24, 2011, 10:00 am
Where: Library and Research Center (225 S. Skinker, across from Forest Park)
How much: $10 per person; $5 for Missouri History Museum members
Reservations: Reservations are required; call 314-746-4510 (maximum of 15 participants)

The Civil War and the Home Front in St. Louis Court Records (with Mike Everman, Missouri State Archives-St. Louis)

Since 1999, the Missouri State Archives has worked to make accessible on microfilm and online the records of the St. Louis Circuit Court. Recent work covering 1861-1865 offers the civil and criminal court records as well as an index of the parallel records of the Union provost marshal when the area was under martial law. Examples from these complementary records offer a time machine to reconstruct the lives and personal and business relationships of citizens during this turbulent time.

When: Tuesday, October 25, 2011, 6:00 pm
Where: Missouri History Museum in Forest Park
How much: Free; reservations are not required.

Researching Your Civil War Ancestors (with Dennis Northcott, Missouri History Museum)

Did your Civil War ancestor wear Union blue or Confederate gray? Or was your ancestor a civilian affected by the tumult of the war years? Missouri History Museum associate archivist Dennis Northcott will introduce you to the vast array of genealogical documents and publications that the war produced.

When: Tuesday, November 8, 2011, 6:00 pm
Where: Missouri History Museum in Forest Park
How much: Free; reservations are not required.

View the 2011 calendar of genealogy lectures and workshops (PDF).

UPCOMING CLASSES AT ST. LOUIS PUBLIC LIBRARY

Here's the latest list of upcoming programs we’ll be offering at various metro-area locations. All are sponsored or co-sponsored by St. Louis Public Library. All are free and open to the public. Please note that locations vary.

Tues, Oct 18, 6:30 PM-8:00 PM—Over There: Researching World War I Ancestors. Join us as Tom Pearson discusses print, microfilm, manuscript, and Internet sources of info on ancestors who served during World War I. Hayner Public Library, 401 State Street, Alton, IL 62002. Pre-registration recommended but not required. To register or for more information: tpearson@slpl.org.

Thurs, Oct 20, 10 AM-Noon— The Second War of American Independence: Researching War of 1812 Ancestors. Join us as Tom Pearson discusses book, manuscript, and Internet sources of information about War of 1812 ancestors. Buder Branch. Pre-registration recommended but not required. To register or for more info, email us at tpearson@slpl.org.

Tues, Oct 25, 2:00 PM-3:30 PM—Research at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library. Join us as Tom Pearson discusses print, microfilm, manuscript, and Internet sources of info on ancestors available via ALPL (located in Springfield, IL). Belleville Public Library, 121 E. Washington Street, Belleville, IL 62220. Pre-registration recom-mended but not required. To register or for more information: tpearson@slpl.org.

Sat, Nov 19, 10 AM-Noon--Squeezing Your Sources: Extracting All the Info You Can From Civil War Service and Pension Records. Join us as Tom Pearson describes ways to extract all the info that you possibly can from compiled military service records and pension records. Buder Branch. Pre-registration recommended but not required. To register or for more info, email us at tpearson@slpl.org.

Sat, Dec 17, 10 AM-Noon--Take Your Best Shot: Civil War Artillery! Join us as Tom Pearson discusses Civil War cannon and cannoneers. Buder Branch. Pre-registration recommended but not required. To register or for more info: tpearson@slpl.org.

Buder Branch Library
4401 Hampton Avenue
St. Louis, MO 63109
(314) 352-2900

9am - 9pm Monday-Thursday
9am - 6pm Friday and Saturday
1pm - 5pm Sunday

Free parking is available on Buder Branch parking lot.

Tom Pearson, Reference Librarian
Special Collections Department
St. Louis Public Library
1415 Olive Street
St. Louis, MO 63103