Saturday, December 24, 2011

JUNETEENTH CELEBRATION

Saturday, February 18, 2012 at 9:00 AM --4:00PM

In cooperation with Mid-American Afro-American Genealogy Interest Coalition, Midwest Genealogy Center presents "Juneteenth in February". Classes and displays will help the researcher with intermediate and advanced research techniques. Consultants will also be available to answer your toughest questions. Call 816-252-7228 to register for the workshop and schedule time with a consultant. Speakers include Lyle Gibson, Bill Curtis, Preston Washington, and Angela McComas.

Thursday, December 22, 2011

IT'S THAT TIME AGAIN!

Time to renew your MoSGA membership (or become a member if you aren't already)! You may copy and paste this blog post into your word processor, or fill out the form on the last page of your newsletter (if currently a MoSGA member).

Remember, too, that a MoSGA membership is a great gift idea for the genealogist in your family!

MoSGA Membership Application & Renewal Form

INDIVIDUAL MEMBERSHIP: ____ $20 per year. 4 journals & newsletters; one vote and one conference discount.

FAMILY MEMBERSHIP: ____ $30 per year. 4 journals & newsletters; two votes and two conference discounts.

INSTITUTIONAL MEMBERSHIP: __$20 per year: for societies & libraries. Same benefits as individuals; one vote can be assigned.

CONTRIBUTING MEMBER: ____ $40 per year; same benefits as individual. Donation advantages.

PATRON MEMBER: ____ $100 per year; same benefits as individual; 20% discount on publications (not to be used for resale) and 20% discount on annual conference. Donation advantages.

LIFE MEMBERSHIP: ____ $400 One time payment; other benefits same as individual. Active member status for life. Never needs renewing; non-assignable.

FOREIGN MEMBERSHIP: ____ $40 per year. 4 journals & newsletters; one vote and one conference discount.

Email address: ______________________________________________________.

MoSGA Newsletter Preference: PDF format ____ Print copy ___
I have a home computer and home access to the Internet: Yes ___ No ___
I have home access to at least one genealogy subscription service: Yes ___ No ___
I belong to at least one other genealogical society: Yes ___ No ___
I have published an article in the MoSGA Journal: Yes ___ No ___
I am interested in working as a MoSGA volunteer: Yes ___ No ___
I am interested in serving on the MoSGA Board: Yes ___ No ___

Name ______________________________________________________________
Address ___________________________________________________________
City ______________________________________ State _____ Zip ____________

New member _____ Renewal _____ Include check payable to MoSGA and send to:

MoSGA Membership, PO Box 833, Columbia, MO 65205-0833

Thanks, and happy holidays!

MoSGA 21st CENTURY FUND GRANTS

The 21st Century Fund was established in 2005 during MoSGA's s 25th Anniversary. The fund provides grants of up to $1,000 to Missouri societies, libraries and/or archives to promote the preservation and publication of Missouri genealogical data.

The 2012 grant application and guidelines are now available. Application deadline is April 30, 2012.

The 21st Century Fund is supported by generous donations from the genealogical community. If you wish to make a tax-deductible contribution, please send it to MoSGA, 21st Century Fund, PO Box 833, Columbia MO 65205-0833. Many thanks for your continuing support!

GUNS AT GETTYSBURG

When a Civil War buff talks about guns, he doesn’t mean shoulder arms or handguns: he means cannons! This blog post discusses the types of artillery pieces you will see during your next visit to Gettysburg National Military Park:

LINK

THE UNKINDEST CUT

Never heard of Dr. Leonid Rogozov? He had to remove his own appendix while on duty at the Soviet Antarctic Research Station in 1961:

LINK

SARDINES IN A CAN

Duty on a Civil War ironclad was not without hazards. The vessels were hellishly hot during the summer, and direct hits by large projectiles could cause concussions, fragmentation injuries, and severe burns if a boiler exploded or steam pipe ruptured. Many sailors assigned to duty in southern waters came down with malaria or yellow fever. It was also exceedingly noisy below decks—-many ironclad sailors who survived the war were partially deaf and/or suffered from tinnitus:

LINK

BLACK ANGEL OF BASTOGNE

A Congolese-born Belgian nurse saved hundreds of Americans during the Battle of the Bulge, but only received an award for her compassion and courage last week. Why the delay? The U.S. Army thought she’d been killed when a German bomb utterly destroyed the hospital that she’d been posted to:

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COLONEL SANTA

On Christmas Eve in 1955, a North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) colonel answering the secret emergency red phone was surprised to hear a little boy’s voice asking him if he was really Santa Claus. Turns out a local Sears store’s “Talk to Santa” ad misprinted Santa’s phone number—the number printed in the ad happened to be that of NORAD’s secret hotline:

LINK

Wednesday, December 21, 2011

FILE WIGGLER

Another funny name—this file conversion site can help you open some audio or video files that stump your computer:

LINK

STICK-IN-THE-MUD GENERALS

During 1861, Lincoln’s biggest problem was getting his generals to do something:

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TWEETDECK

Funny name, but what does it do? This free app helps you monitor all the social networking stuff you do from one convenient dashboard:

LINK

NO HITCHHIKERS ALLOWED!

If you’re using a wireless router at home, it may well be unsecured. If so, skinflint neighbors (and kiddie porn perverts) can use your bandwidth to hop onto the Internet:

LINK

Monday, December 19, 2011

PHOTO FILMSTRIP

Want to make a DVD of those holiday/reunion photos? This free application can make it happen with a bare minimum of fuss and bother:

LINK

CLIP ART BONANZA

Need a free image (actually illustrations, photographs, animations, and sounds, to be precise) for that project you’re trying to finish? Your BFFs at Microsoft are here to help:

LINK

CEDAR & VERNON COUNTY GS UPDATE

Hello:

The November 2011 newsletter is available on our website.

Regards,
Nancy Thompson
Cedar & Vernon County Genealogical Society
218 W. Walnut St., Nevada, MO 64772

web: www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~motcogs/
email: Cedar.VernonCoMO@centurytel.net

FRANCES QUISENBERRY

Frances Quisenberry of Mexico, Missouri has died at age 91. She was a charter member and tireless worker for the Audrain County Genealogical Society. She was given an Award of Merit by MoSGA for her efforts in that regard. Read the entire obit here:

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Thursday, December 15, 2011

HOW TO GEEK

Are you a confirmed geek (or, perhaps, a closet geek finally ready to come out into the light)? Then you’ll probably like the How to Geek website:

LINK

THE RIFLE-MUSKET QUESTION

Did rifle-muskets really change the face of battle during the Civil War, or did they have less effect on tactics than some historians and Civil War buffs seem to think?

LINK

REGISTER OF ENLISTMENTS (U.S. ARMY), 1798-1914

A subscription database, but likely to be useful for many genealogists:

This database contains a register of enlistments in the U.S. Regular Army from 1798-1914. The Regular Army is comprised of career soldiers and maintained through peacetime. Therefore, this database will not usually include individuals who enlisted as part of a reserve or during wartime for limited periods of time, or in a military unit raised by a state. Data in these registers was compiled from a variety of other military records, including enlistment papers, muster rolls, and unit records. Information listed on these records includes:

• Name of enlistee
• Age at time of enlistment
• Birthplace
• Date of enlistment
• Enlistment place
• Occupation
• Physical description (eye color, hair color, complexion, and height)
• Rank, company, and regiment
• Date and cause of discharge
• Remarks

Note: some of this information may only be obtained by viewing the register image. Also, the register images are usually two pages long. When viewing an image, be sure to scroll all the way to the right in order to see all pages that are part of that record.

These records are arranged chronologically and alphabetically according to first letter of the surname.

LINK

HAPPY 375th!

That’s how old the National Guard is:

LINK

RABBI-CHAPLAINS OF THE CIVIL WAR

The federal army’s first rabbi-chaplain never finished his rabbinical studies—-before the war, he’d been a liquor salesman:

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ROOTSWEB REVIEW

The December 14, 2011 issue of Rootsweb Review is the last ever:

LINK

Wednesday, December 14, 2011

REDHAVEN OUTLINE

If there’s something you need to keep track of, this free program can probably help you do it. As the creators state on their website, it’s great for:

* making lists
* making lists of lists
* keeping track of research information
* preparing speeches and presentations
* developing the structure of research papers
* organizing computer shortcuts and favorite websites
* keeping records

LINK

RETURNS FROM U.S. MILITARY POSTS, 1806-1916

A subscription database available from Ancestry.com:

This database contains returns from U.S. military posts from the early 1800's to 1916, with a few returns extending through 1917.

Army Regulations stipulated that every post was to submit a return to the Adjutant General, usually at monthly intervals. These returns showed:

• The units stationed at each post
• The strength of each unit
• Names and duties of the officers
• Number of officers present and absent
• Listing of official communications received
Record of events

This information was returned on forms provided by the Office of the Adjutant General. Over the years, several changes were made to the forms, but the general information recorded was the same. In the earlier years some returns were sent on manuscript forms. These manuscript forms followed the format of the printed forms. Earlier post returns also used the same forms as the regimental and organizational returns.

While most of the records in this collection consist of monthly post returns, some additional records, such as morning reports, field returns, rosters of officers, and other related papers, have been mixed in. These additional records provide supplemental information or act as substitutes for missing returns. Records are available for military posts in all 50 states, Washington D.C., Cuba, Panama Canal Zone, Philippine Islands, Puerto Rico, Canada, China, and Mexico.

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PROTECTING PARIS

During World War I, Paris officials decided that the best way to protect their city was to build a fake Paris for the Germans to bomb:

LINK

WHY THEY FIGHT

Why do soldiers risk injury or death in battle? In some cases, it’s because of the drugs they were taking:

LINK

Tuesday, December 13, 2011

GUIDE TO COLLECTIONS AT THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF HEALTH AND MEDICINE

An online guide to the various collections maintained by NMHM:

LINK

REPORT TO THE JFK ASSASSINATION RECORDS REVIEW BOARD (1997)

Report made by a National Museum of Health & Medicine staffer regarding what records concerning the JFK assassination were held by institution in 1997. Part of the report deals with the question of whether NMHM ever had custody of the president’s brain:

LINK

HOSPITAL SHIPS MATERIAL IN THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF HEALTH & MEDICINE COLLECTION

Finding aid (1862-1952) for miscellaneous materials in the collection (many photographs, some artworks):

LINK

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF HEALTH & MEDICINE IMAGE GALLERIES

Images (mostly photos) on 14 different military medicine topics. A cautionary note warns that some images may not be suitable for all viewers:

LINK

Thursday, December 08, 2011

PICKING UP THE PIECES IF YOUR COMPUTER CRASHES

What should you do if you’re ever in that situation? Microsoft has some advice:

LINK

NOTE: You are doing regular back-ups, right?

FREE EBOOKS

A library discussion list I subscribe to has had a lot of chatter recently concerning the plight of small libraries that can’t afford free user download services. If your library is in that boat (or if you work in a library that’s in that boat), you should know that you (and your patrons) can access thousands of ebooks for free (legally) online:

LINK

And thousands of free audiobooks: LINK

NOTE: If your library does not offer free ebook, audiobook, and music downloads, you may want to get an Annual User card at a library that does. I think you’ll find that the cost of an Annual User card is much less than the cost of purchasing access to the number of items you’ll be able to download.

For example, a Mid-Continent Library Out-of-District Annual Card for residents of Missouri and Kansas costs $60. $60 will buy you approximately six new ebooks or three new audiobooks from an online vendor like Amazon.com. If you download just one ebook per week from Mid-Continent, that’s an annual savings to you of $460 ($520 - $60). If you download just one audiobook per week from Mid-Continent, that’s an annual savings to you of $980 ($1040 - $60).

Here's info from their website on their Out-of-District cards for Missouri and Kansas residents:

The following options are available to persons living outside of the Mid-Continent Public Library service area:

Out-of-District card -- New Out-of-District cards can be issued at any of our 30 branch locations. New Out-of-District cards will be issued only to Missouri or Kansas residents living outside the MCPL service area. You must be present to register for an Out-of-District card. There is a fee of $60.00 and the card is valid for one year. Cards about to expire or expired can be renewed in person or by mail, phone, or email.


More info here.

And here's Mid-Continent’s online guide to Digital Downloads:

LINK

KINDLE USERS’ GUIDE

Free guides for each Kindle incarnation are available here:

LINK

COLORED PATRIOTS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION (1855)

Didn’t know there were any? This free ebook will set you straight:

LINK

Wednesday, December 07, 2011

PRESERVING FAMILY MEMORIES

Kansas City, (MO)… The National Archives at Kansas City will be offering a free workshop, Preserving Family Memories, to the public on Friday, December 9 at 10:00 a.m.

This workshop is a quick overview of three vital components in family history: oral interviews, physical preservation, and reading old script. Oral interviews coupled with family papers and heirlooms provide the foundation for any genealogist’s family history research. Beginning at home with these pieces left by previous generations will launch you into other areas of research. Learn how to protect and preserve these precious assets for many generations to come. This workshop will be presented by Lori Cox-Paul, Director of Archival Operations, and Jennifer Audsley Moore, Archives Technician and Volunteer Coordinator.

To make a reservation for this free workshop, please call 816-268-8000 or email: kansascity.archives@nara.gov.

The National Archives at Kansas City is one of 13 facilities nationwide where the public has access to Federal archival records. It is home to historical records dating from the 1820s to the 1990s created or received by Federal agencies in Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota. For more information, call 816-268-8000 or go here.

OVERVIEW OF THE ATTACK ON PEARL HARBOR

Lots of information and images on the Navy History & Heritage Command website regarding the 7 December 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor:

LINK

NO LUCK? SPREAD OUT!

If you’re trying to solve a Civil War soldier mystery, you might try creating a spreadsheet that contains known information for that soldier and his relatives/friends in the same regiment. It will make it easier to see all their info at a glance, and will likely suggest additional sources of potential information on your soldier:

LINK

NORTH CAROLINA WWII DRAFT CARDS

PROVO, UTAH – (December 2, 2011) – In remembrance of the upcoming 70th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor marking the entrance of the United States into World War II, Ancestry.com (Nasdaq: ACOM), the world’s largest online family history resource, announced it has made available images of nearly two million draft cards filled out by North Carolina residents to its World War II records collection. The draft cards were completed by men living in North Carolina during the early 1940s who were born between 1897 and 1929, a more recent time period than ever made available before. Ancestry.com is offering six days (December 2-7) of free access to these U.S. World War II North Carolina Young Men’s Draft Cards, and its entire World War II records collection to help foster greater insight and detail into families’ histories.

The release of these Young Men’s Draft Cards from North Carolina marks Ancestry.com’s first installment of U.S. World War II draft cards from this series to be released online. Ancestry.com worked in conjunction with the National Archives and Records Administration in Atlanta to digitize the records and make them available on the site. Information such as name, serial number, address, age, place of birth, employer’s name and physical measurements are included on the cards.

In 1940, due to an increase in conflict around the world, President Franklin D. Roosevelt created the first peacetime selective service draft in the history of the U.S. With the country’s entrance into World War II a year later, a new selective service act required that all men between ages 18 and 65 register for the draft. Seven registrations were held between November 1940 and October 1946. More than 50 million American men registered, and more than 10 million of those were inducted into the U.S. Armed Forces. Until now, information on only one of these registrations had been made available to the public.

“North Carolinians have always played an important role within all branches of the U.S. military, and during World War II more of our residents served in the U.S. Army than in any other branch,” said Eric Muller, a University of North Carolina law professor who has written about the draft in WWII. “The draft cards that Ancestry.com has made available provide North Carolinians with an important resource to connect to their families’ history of World War II service.”

According to the North Carolina State Archives, more than 370,000 men and womenfrom the state served in all branches of the military during World War II. By the end of the War, nearly 10,000 Tar Heels had lost their lives in the line of duty.

Although they did not serve in the military, notable North Carolinians whose draft cards can be found in this collection include:

Andy Griffith—-Actor, producer and director known best for The Andy Griffith Show, on which he portrayed a sheriff in the fictional town of Mayberry, North Carolina, from 1960 to 1968. When Griffith registered for the draft as a 6’½” 18 year-old in June 1944 in Surry County, where he was born and raised, and his occupation was listed as “unemployed.”

Billy Graham—Famous American Christian evangelist known for his radio and television broadcasts. When Graham filled out his draft card through the registrar in Wheaton, Illinois in October 1940, he was a student at Wheaton College, but the slim 21-year-old (6’2½”, 140 pounds) listed his home address in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Ralph Earnhardt—NASCAR legend and patriarch of the Earnhardt racing dynasty, Ralph was father of NASCAR Hall of Famer Dale Earnhardt and grandfather of current NASCAR Sprint Cup driver Dale Earnhardt Jr. Earnhardt’s draft card notes the 18-year-old was born in Kannapolis, North Carolina and was working as a farmhand in town when he was drafted in February 1946. It also references a scar on the left side of his face.

In addition to the North Carolina Young Men’s Draft Cards, Ancestry.com is also featuring the following World War II records as part of the free promotion:

World War II Navy Muster Rolls (1939-1949)—The most comprehensive set of these records ever released online. Nearly all enlisted personnel who served aboard a Navy ship between January 1939 and January 1949 are included in this collection, including more than 2,400 Americans who were killed in the attack on Pearl Harbor.

National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (Punchbowl Cemetery) Database—More than 120,000 records and images of headstones and names on memorials from 1949 to 1976. Of the 13,000 buried at the Cemetery, 700 are veterans who died in the attack on Pearl Harbor.

These new World War II collections can be found at www.ancestry.com/pearlharbor.

“World War II impacted millions of American families and we felt this was an appropriate time to make our collection available at no cost and provide the public an opportunity to explore through records, how the War may have touched their family,” said Josh Hanna, Executive Vice President, Ancestry.com. “Ancestry.com hosts the largest online collection of historical military records and these new additions to our World War II catalog add further depth to this important collection.”

About Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com)

Ancestry.com Inc. (Nasdaq: ACOM) is the world's largest online family history resource, with more than 1.7 million paying subscribers. More than 7 billion records have been added to the site in the past 15 years. Ancestry users have created more than 28 million family trees containing over 2.8 billion profiles. Ancestry.com has local Web sites directed at nine countries that help people discover, preserve and share their family history, including its flagship Web site at www.ancestry.com.

Forward-Looking Statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those anticipated by these forward-looking statements. Such risks and uncertainties include our continuing ability to acquire, digitize and make desired content conveniently available to our subscribers.Information concerning additional factors that could cause events or results to differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements is contained under the caption "Risk Factors" in our Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2011, and in discussions in other of our Securities and Exchange Commission filings. These forward-looking statements should not be relied upon as representing our views as of any subsequent date and we assume no obligation to publicly update or revise these forward-looking statements.

IRISH NEWSPAPER ARCHIVE

It’s a subscription website (subscribe for a day, week, month, or year), but a free search is available:

Welcome to Irish Newspaper Archive - the world's largest online database of Irish Newspapers. Search, retrieve and view Ireland's past exactly as it was originally published. With many of Ireland's leading national, regional and out of print titles, this website is a wonderful resource for novice historians and academic institutes.

As our archive ranges from the 1700's to present it takes in many of the seminal moments in the development of New World countries such as Australia, Canada and the United States, to name but a few. The national newspapers give a unique perspective on national and international events through the Irish news press, whilst the local titles are a wonderful resource for all those interested in genealogical research and local history investigations.

LINK

ICON

This site (International Coalition on Newspapers) maintains an international list of newspaper digitization projects:

LINK

CHRONICLING AMERICA DIGITIZED NEWSPAPERS (1836-1922)

Finding aid of newspapers available on Library of Congress’s Chronicling America website:

LINK

Tuesday, December 06, 2011

HISTORICAL NEWSPAPERS ONLINE

University of Pennsylvania’s list of American newspapers available online:

LINK

GOOGLE NEWS ARCHIVE SOURCES LIST

A list of all the newspapers available in the Google News Archive:

LINK

GET YOUR GADGETS!

You may know them as widgets--Microsoft offers some free ones:

LINK

MICROSOFT DOWNLOADS

Sure, Microsoft wants to sell you stuff—-it’s a corporation, after all. They do offer a surprising amount of fairly nice free stuff, however (for Windows 7, Windows Vista, and Windows XP):

LINK

OUR BLOG

The blog itself is interesting and informative, but they may wish to sponsor a Give Our Blog a Better Name contest:

The blog of the Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center:

LINK

Monday, December 05, 2011

ONLINE NEWSPAPER ARCHIVES

Wikipedia list of online newspaper archives:

LINK

FAMILY WE SEARCH

Don’t know if you’re aware of this site. The site owner (Kathy Wieland) is a St. Louis area local who does genie research in local courthouses. She also offers school yearbooks, church jubilee books, family histories, and local histories for sale. Just use Missouri (or other state name) as your keyword:

LINK

AMERICAN CIVIL WAR UNITS FILE

Need help researching a Union or Confederate military unit (all states)? A knowledgeable volunteer may be available who can offer you research tips and other helpful info:

LINK

KINDLE FIRE vs. NOOK TABLET

Don’t know which to purchase for yourself or as a Christmas gift? Like so many decisions we’re called upon to make, that depends…

LINK

Friday, December 02, 2011

REMEMBER PEARL HARBOR!

Ancestry.com wants to help you commemorate Pearl Harbor and other events of World War II. All of its WWII databases can be searched for free now through 7 December 2011:

LINK

FOOBAR 2000

Yes, the name's a little weird, but if you just need a lightweight music player that can handle more than a dozen audio formats, this free application may be all that you need:

LINK

MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR SERVICE RECORDS

Now available on Fold3.com:

The U.S.-Mexican War determined the southwest border of the United States as we know it today. Fighting began after the 1845 annexation of Texas and ended with the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo on February 2, 1848. The territory gained would ultimately become the states of California, Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, Utah, Texas, and Colorado, with portions contributing to Wyoming and Kansas.

Mexican War Service Records contain valuable first-hand information about battles, troop movements, officers, and soldiers. While the United States had a standing army at the time, most of the soldiers who fought in the Mexican War were volunteers from various states. At present, there are five sets of records on Fold3 with information on forty-four units, and the men who served in them, from Mississippi, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, and the Mormon Battalion.

Muster Rolls provide details on Promotions, Payments, Casualties, Those killed in battle and Deserters, as well as Physical descriptions. Unit information includes company muster rolls naming recruits, deserters, and those on special assignment; and regimental returns with battle histories and casualties. Company locations—the National Palace Mexico, Lobas Island in the Gulf of Mexico, and Camp nr. Jalapa Mexico—provide geographic perspectives.

Other titles on Fold3 round out the Mexican War Collection. If you're interested in a Pennsylvania soldier, alphabetical service record abstracts in the Pennsylvania Archives match the imaged service record cards within the state's two regiments. For Mormon Battalion soldiers, you can pair service records with the Mormon Battalion Pension Files.

Explore the Mexican War Service Records to learn more about the men who served in this geographically critical war.

OUR MILITARY HERITAGE

An online service offered by the Allen County Public Library. They’re providing biographical sketches, unit rosters, letters and diaries, photographs, and other documents for American wars from colonial times to the present day. Emphasis is Indiana regiments and veterans, but there is plenty of information on military units and soldiers from other states:

LINK

NOTE: Many photos of gravestones of soldiers who were killed in action.

OTHER STATES RESOURCES

Allen County Public Library doesn’t just provide information on Indiana counties and ancestors—it’s got a lot of great information on various other states, too:

LINK

GENEALOGY GEMS

Not subscribing to this newsletter from the Allen County Public Library? Why not? It's chock full of great information, it’s easy to subscribe to—-and it’s free:

LINK

NOTE: Click on Genealogy Community on the top line, then EZine.

MISSOURI HISTORY MUSEUM UPDATE

The following sources have recently been added to the Genealogy and Local History Index:

1. Foto Feature, 1959 (includes photographs of African American children who were students at LesPierrettes School of Dance)

2. Bench and Bar of Missouri Scrapbooks, circa 1880s-1960s

3. Directory of the Carondelet Presbyterian Church, 1886

4. Historical Sketch, Reports and Directory of Carondelet Presbyterian Church, 1892

5. Directory of Cabanne Methodist Episcopal Church, South, 1906

SEARCH THE GENEALOGY & LOCAL HISTORY INDEX

Here's a list of the sources they're currently indexing. As they're completed, they'll be added to the Genealogy and Local History Index.

1. Who's Who in Missouri: A Compilation of Biographical Information on Outstanding Citizens of the State of Missouri, 1974

2. Missouri Pacific Lines Magazine, 1942-1965

3. Union Electric Magazine, 1913-1960s

4. Roster of the Department of Missouri, Grand Army of the Republic, and Its Auxiliaries, 1895

5. Weick Brothers Undertaking Company Records, 1911-1968

6. Independent Evangelical Protestant Church Record Book of Marriages, 1884-1903

7. Normandy Courier (Normandy High School newsletter), 1937-1958 (incomplete run)

8. Medical Scrapbooks (includes articles and obituaries mostly regarding St. Louis doctors), circa 1910s-1960s

9. St. Louis Police Department annual reports, 1870s-1940s

FEATURED TITLE: WWII DIARIES

Experience the battles of Midway, Guadalcanal, the Coral Sea, and countless smaller naval encounters in World War II as only those in the midst of the fighting could.

The WWII War Diaries on Fold3 are daily operational journals created by various naval commands of the U.S. Navy, providing first-hand accounts by the commanders of the ships that saw action. Reports from December 7, 1941 to December 31, 1945 originally marked as "secret" and "confidential" now offer important historical and strategic perspectives relating to the war at sea.

This collection of over a million document images tells the story of a critical era in naval history. Examples of what you may find include:

• Bomb damage report of the USS Yorktown after Coral Sea
• Whale sightings originally mistaken for enemy subs
• Rescue of pilot at sea
• Personnel transfers
• Organizational chart for Marine Corps amphibious operations

War patrol reports can be riveting reading detailing a ship's hour-by-hour activities while at sea. For instance, the Report of the Fifth War Patrol, by the commander of the submarine USS Pogy describes firing torpedoes near Midway in the early hours of February 10, 1944. A Pogy torpedo hit a freighter and "a tremendous tongue of flame shot 500 feet in the air. We could feel the heat of it on the bridge, and by its glare we became instantly visible to an admiring multitude of Japanese." The commander commends the men aboard, yet says there are "too many dull-eyed seamen and firemen who cannot be pushed up into petty officer ratings and who have difficulty even in qualifying in submarines."

Although some reports are handwritten, many typed reports and diaries are OCR searchable. Browse or search on a battle location or keyword, or on the name of a person, Navy ship, aircraft, fleet, or unit of command. Although you'll find many abbreviations The World War II War Diaries description includes a list to help you decipher them.

According to the National Archives, war diaries were identified by the Navy in 1944 as "the principal means by which the day-to-day experience of the Navy is recorded for current study and future historical use." We're pleased to further this mission at Fold3:

LINK

IMPACT EARTH

This simulator can predict the damage likely when a projectile of a certain size, composition, speed, and angle of impact hits the earth:

LINK

NOTE: Needless to say, you don’t want anything really good-sized to wallop the earth, as the damage from wind sheer, earth tremors, tsumanis, and crater ejecta can be catastrophic to say the least…

Wednesday, November 30, 2011

SEAMEN’S PROTECTION CERTIFICATES, 1792-1868

A subscription database on Ancestry.com of possible interest to those with War of 1812 ancestors:

In the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, Britain routinely removed British sailors who were found on American ships--but those removals sometimes included men who had become naturalized American citizens. The practice, known as impressment, became one of the central causes of the War of 1812.

In an effort to protect American seamen from impressment, Congress authorized the issuance of Seamen’s Protection Certificates, which identified seamen as American citizens. Since citizenship was a requirement, you’ll typically find the place of birth listed and could find naturalization details for immigrants.

For identification purposes, the records also include physical descriptions. Typically age, height, complexion, eye and hair color is given as well as scars and other distinctive physical features.

LINK

NATIONAL NAVAL AVIATION MUSEUM EXHIBITS & COLLECTIONS

Quite a few online exhibits, including one on naval airships and balloons:

LINK

An “Aircraft on Display” section offers a photo of each aircraft plus some technical data on that vehicle:

LINK

Need a Christmas gift for a former Navy or Marine aviator? The Museum shop offers dozens of gift possibilities:

LINK

There’s a Clearance Page with some T-shirts that might make a great gift for that blasé teen on your list:

LINK

If you should feel the need to give a stranger a gift, I’ll take any of the biplanes or tri-planes in their Model collection:

LINK

BRITISH NEWSPAPERS 1800-1900

A subscription service, although there is some free content available:

This site contains:

Millions of articles from 49 London, national and regional newspaper (1800 - 1900) titles.
Over two million pages - all fully text searchable with keywords in context visible in the results list.
1000's of illustrations, maps, tables and photographs.

Use this website to:

Search and find results by newspaper, title, and article type.
Find people, property, legal notices, and advertisements.
Print, email, download, and save articles and page images.
Explore bonus content: biographies, publication histories, timelines and more.

LINK

NEW ANCESTRY.COM APP FOR iPHONE, iPAD AND iPOD TOUCH

New ‘Ancestry.com Mobile’ iOS App Gives Users the Ability to Access Billions of Historical Records to Build Their Family Tree

PROVO, UTAH (November 29, 2011) – Ancestry.com, the world’s largest online family history resource, today announced the availability of a new, upgraded version of its Ancestry.com Mobile app for iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch with features designed to enable more rewarding discoveries as users build, update and share their family trees. The Ancestry.com mobile app, which to-date has been downloaded more than 1.7 million times, is now available for free from the Apple App Store.

This upgrade adds three new features to Ancestry.com’s existing family history app:

In-app purchasing,” which allows non-Ancestry.com subscribers to view, then buy fascinating historical records about their ancestors – such as World War I draft cards, Census records, birth/death certificates, and school yearbook photos, from among billions of historical documents in the Ancestry.com database

A “Shaky Leaf” hinting feature that employs predictive analytics to suggest possible new connections between a user’s family tree and undiscovered documents in the world’s largest family history database

A new merge feature, which automatically identifies and extracts information about family members from historical records so users can quickly and easily update their family tree

“Our goal with the new Ancestry.com mobile app is to enable more people to discover their family history through our billions of historic records, and allow them to share their findings easily with others,” said Eric Shoup, Senior Vice President of Product at Ancestry.com. “Our ‘Shaky Leaf’ hinting feature has resulted in tens of millions of successful family history discoveries online and it’s now accessible to our growing mobile user base.”

For users new to Ancestry.com, the latest iOS app provides an easy way to get started by giving access to relevant historical documents on the site without a subscription. For existing Ancestry.com members, the new app gives them the ability to grow their tree using Ancestry.com records and share them with others while on-the-go.

The Ancestry.com mobile app offers many of the most popular features available in the online version of Ancestry.com’s industry-leading family history website, including the ability to add and edit family information, view and share documents and photos, take and attach photos and create and navigate multi-generational family trees.

To get started, download the free Ancestry.com mobile app to an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch, and either register for a new, or log in to an existing Ancestry.com account and choose a family tree. Ancestry.com subscribers can download family history records in the app free of charge. Non-subscribers pay a special introductory price starting at $0.99 for each record purchased through the Mobile app’s “in-app purchase” feature.

About Ancestry.com

Ancestry.com Inc. (Nasdaq: ACOM) is the world's largest online family history resource, with approximately 1.7 million paying subscribers. More than 7 billion records have been added to the site in the past 15 years. Ancestry users have created more than 28 million family trees containing over 2.8 billion profiles. In addition to its flagship site, Ancestry.com offers localized Web sites designed for nine countries that empower people to discover, preserve and share their family history.

Monday, November 28, 2011

DON’T BE A CHUMP

This GPO blog post concerns avoiding Ponzi schemes during the holiday season:

LINK

NOTE: What to do to avoid being scammed at any time? Four tips for you:

1. If it sounds too good to be true, it is. Run (don’t walk) away!
2. If something about a business deal gives you pause, do some more fact-finding before signing on the dotted line—the angel on your shoulder is likely screaming a warning in your ear!
3. If one company’s offer is astoundingly better than its competitors, chances are there’s a deal-breaking catch—very carefully read the fine print!
4. If you get an email or phone message purportedly from a company or government agency you do business with that suddenly needs to have your Social Security number, date of birth, and account number verified, don’t respond directly to the email or caller (it’s almost certainly a scam). Look up the company or agency’s phone number in a source you trust (don’t use a phone number furnished in the email or by the caller) and ask if they have contacted you recently with a question about your account.

PDF CV

Looking for that first job (or looking to upgrade your employment situation)? pdfCV makes it easy to quickly create a really great-looking resume:

LINK

WHY DO AMERICANS USE SOCIAL MEDIA?

It’s kind of a duh! question with kind of a duh! answer (To keep in contact with friends/relatives, and to resume contact with misplaced friends/relatives), but this Pew Internet report is pretty interesting anyway:

LINK

Wednesday, November 23, 2011

NEWSPAPERS FINDING AID

The American Antiquarian Society maintains a list of newspapers microfilmed by the United States Newspaper Program:

LINK

HOME (MORE OR LESS) FOR THE HOLIDAYS

So you thought that the whole clan couldn’t be together for the holidays? Maybe they can, after all—at least in virtual form:

LINK

CLASSICAL MUSIC ON CLASSICAL ARCHIVES

If there’s a classical music lover on your gift list, this online (subscription) archive offers access to thousands of classical music performances:

LINK

43 FREE DATABASES AT FOLD3.COM

Nice list of 43 databases that can be accessed without a subscription:

LINK

WHISTLER’S BROTHER

The famous American artist had a not-so-famous brother who served as a surgeon in the Confederate Army:

LINK

Monday, November 21, 2011

PROJECT GUTENBERG’S GIFTS TO YOU

Pro G must be feeling that holiday spirit: it currently offers 36,000 free ebooks in various genres:

LINK

NOTE: The number of free ebooks available is actually over 100,000 if you count Pro G’s Partners & Affiliates:

LINK

GRAVES, TOMBS, AND CEMETERIES

You are a genealogist, right? So it goes without saying that you love tramping through graveyards—-you never know when you’ll find a relative! Well, you can now do some of your tramping from the comfort of your own home: the Flickr photo-sharing site has a Graves, Tombs, and Cemeteries group whose members have (thus far) uploaded nearly 200,000 photos:

LINK

NOTE: Is it just me, or is funerary statuary often really, really cool?

LINK

CIVIL WAR PHOTO GALLERY

More than 1200 photos and illustrations in 36 categories:

LINK

Saturday, November 19, 2011

THE OTHER HEROES

180,000 black men served in the Union Army—38,000 of them died while in uniform:

LINK

OPEN LP

What is it? It’s a great free software application that allows your church services to go digital:

LINK

SOUTHERN CULTURES BOOK REVIEWS

Eleven years worth of book reviews that you can read for free online:

LINK

FREE EMAIL SERVICES

What’s the best free email service? Kim Komando weighs in here:

LINK

BRITISH NURSING RECORDS

If a relative served in the British Nursing Service during World War I, these recently released records may be just what you’ve been waiting for:

LINK

VOICES OF THE ARMISTICE

National Archives (UK) is providing a series of podcasts created using official reports, unit records, and private diaries created during World War I:

LINK

Wednesday, November 16, 2011

MOVIE MONSTERS

Other factors were involved, certainly, but an ironclad grip on the German film industry without question helped Hitler and his henchmen control the German populace:

LINK

WORDLE

Easily create beautiful tag clouds using text that you provide:

LINK

CIVIL WAR TRAVELLER

This website provides podcasts that discuss Civil War battles in various states. It also provides a downloadable driving/walking tour map for each battlefield:

LINK

CIVIL WAR IN VIRGINIA—WALK IN THEIR FOOTSTEPS

Was your ancestor’s regiment (Union or Confederate) involved in military engagements in Virginia during the Civil War? This neat website allows you to see on a modern map where the regiment took part in military actions. The site also provides an historical sketch for highlighted regiments.

LINK

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

OUR TAG CLOUD

If you're new to this blog (or just like shortcuts), you can quickly view prior posts on various subjects by using the TAG CLOUD feature in the right-hand navigation bar on this blog. Just left-click the subject of interest!

DAY ZERO PROJECT

Are there things you would like to accomplish that never seem to get done? Are there things your genie society would like to accomplish, but never seem to get done? Maybe the Day Zero Project can help:

LINK

U.S. AIR FORCE MUSEUM PHOTO GALLERIES

Fascinating photo galleries on these subjects:

Early Years Gallery
World War II Gallery
Korean War Gallery
Southeast Asia War Gallery
Cold War Gallery
Missile & Space Gallery
Presidential Gallery
R&D Gallery
Air Park
Memorial Park
Restoration Projects


LINK

NOTE: I visited the USAF Museum once while returning from a visit to the Gettysburg battlefield. Highly recommended (bias note: I'm a USAF vet), although they make taking photos more difficult by lowering the illumination in many areas.

A GIFT FOR YOUR CIVIL WAR NUT SPOUSE

If your spouse is a Civil War nut who seems to have every possible Civil War-related gift item already, here's a possibility. NARA-KC on its website is offering several Civil War games for the PC. I've got my eye on this one:

CHICKAMAUGA CAMPAIGN

It was at Chickamauga that Confederate General Braxton Bragg launched his counteroffensive to retake the vital rail junction city of Chattanooga from Union General Rosecrans. And it was at Chickamauga that the Confederacy had one of its last chances to win the American Civil War. Among other things, it was here that General George Thomas won the nickname “Rock of Chickamauga” for this valiant stand.

Chickamauga Features

* 170 stand alone scenarios and 80 campaign scenarios
* 4 different campaigns for a varied campaign experience, each also has a "weather variant" to choose from.
* Scenarios include: Perryville, Stones River, Frankfort, Nashville, Chickamauga, Greater Mill Springs and Chattanooga
* Large maps and inclusive orders of battle offer unlimited possibilities for user-created scenarios.

Engine changes include:

* Added new Mounted Cavalry Skirmisher Optional Rule.
* Added new Artillery Prolong Optional Rule.
* Added new Disrupted Movement Optional Rule.
* Added new Alternate Terrain Graphics scenario option.
* Change so that artillery cannot be spiked the same turn it is captured.

Scenario and Campaign editors are included to allow the player to create their own situations to play out. Play modes include A/I, Hot Seat, PBEM, LAN & Internet play.

Minimum Requirements

* Pentium-based 200mhz+ PC with 32 megabytes of RAM. - 250 megabytes of hard drive space
* Windows 98/ME/XP operating system.
* DirectX 9+ is required and will install if not already present and not superceded. Win95 is no longer supported.

Chickamauga Campaign

Also of interest for your Civil War nut:

Gettysburg Campaign (Windows 98/ME/XP operating system.)

Chancellorsville Campaign (Windows 98/ME/XP/Vista operating system.)

War & Conflict CD-Rom (Windows 98/ME/XP operating system.)

NOTE: I've got an older game for PC (Robert E. Lee, Civil War General) that I love, but it's getting harder to use as I change PCs and operating systems. Maybe Chickamauga Campaign can fill the void that loss of Bobby Lee would create!

THE BATTLE OF MINE CREEK

Author Jeffrey Stalnaker to Discuss The Battle of Mine Creek: The Crushing End of the Missouri Campaign at the National Archives

The National Archives at Kansas City will host author Jeffrey Stalnaker on Thursday, November 17 at 6:30 p.m. for a discussion of his book The Battle of Mine Creek: The Crushing End of the Missouri Campaign. Stalnaker will be available to sign copies of his book after the discussion. A 6:00 p.m. reception will precede the event.

In 1864 Union troops controlled much of the South, Sherman’s men marched with impunity through Georgia, and defeat at Gettysburg was a painful and distant memory. The Confederacy needed to stem the tide. Confederate Major General Sterling Price led an army of twelve thousand troops on a desperate charge through Missouri to deliver the state to the Confederacy and dash President Lincoln’s hopes for re-election. This daring campaign culminated with the Battle of Mine Creek. A severely outnumbered Union force crushed the Confederate forces in one of the war’s largest and most audacious cavalry charges. In this account Stalnaker provides detail about the Union troopers as they destroyed all hope for rebel victory in the Trans-Mississippi.

Copies of The Battle of Mine Creek: The Crushing End of the Missouri Campaign will be available for purchase via The Kansas City Store onsite. For more information or to make a reservation for this free event call 816-268-8010 or email kansascity.educate@nara.gov.

About the author

Jeffrey Stalnaker is a graduate of the University of Kansas. After college graduation, he spent eight years in marketing with Adidas. Stalnaker is now a freelance sales and marketing consultant. He has pursued an interest as a living historian/re-enactor for several decades and is a member of several local heritage and historic organizations.

The National Archives at Kansas City is home to more than 50,000 cubic feet of historical records dating from the 1820s to the 1990s created or received by nearly 100 Federal agencies. Serving the Central Plains Region, the archives holds records from the states of Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota available for public access. The facility is located at 400 West Pershing Road, Kansas City, MO 64108. It is open to the public Tuesday-Saturday 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. for research, with the exhibits open from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. For more information, call 816-268-8000 or visit: www.archives.gov/central-plains.

Monday, November 14, 2011

CAMBODIAN MINE ACTION CENTRE

One way to figure out where unexploded land mines lie buried—-create a database that logs the location of unexploded mine “incidents”:

LINK

NOTE: Yes, “incident” involves some poor unfortunate’s loss of one or both legs—and that unfortunate is too often a child…

FACEBOOK, BUT FOR FAMILIES

Chattertree is in some ways like Facebook, but designed to serve as a nexus for exchange of family info, not a place where teens/college kids can tell their BFFs how bored they are or how lame they think something/someone is:

LINK

SLIMCOMPUTER

If your computer seems to be booting up/running more slowly than it used to (or if you suspect that your brand new computer has unnecessary crapware pre-installed), SlimComputer can help make your machine as sleek and swift as it was designed to be:

LINK

A UNION ARMY CAPTAIN FORSEES HIS DEATH

Actually, it’s not entirely clear if he foresaw his own death, or just sensed death on the horizon for thousands of young men as the Civil War really heated up:

LINK

NOTE: Scroll down to the post for October 30, 2011.

GENEALOGY & MILITARY HISTORY PROGRAMS OCT 2011-MAR 2012

Here's the latest list of upcoming programs sponsored or co-sponsored by St. Louis Public Library. All are free and open to the public.

Sat, Nov 19, 2011, 10 AM-Noon--Squeezing Your Sources: Extracting All the Info You Can From Civil War Service and Pension Records. Join us as Tom Pearson describes ways to extract all the info that you possibly can from compiled military service records and pension records. Buder Branch. Pre-registration recommended but not required. To register or for more info, email us at tpearson@slpl.org.

Sat, Dec 17, 2011, 10 AM-Noon--Take Your Best Shot: Civil War Artillery! Join us as Tom Pearson discusses Civil War cannon and cannoneers. Buder Branch. Pre-registration recommended but not required. To register or for more info: tpearson@slpl.org.

Saturday, January 23, 2012, 10 am-Noon—Cavalry Raids: Secret Weapons or Flashy Sideshows? Buder Branch. Join us as Tom Pearson discusses Civil War cavalry weapons, equipment, and tactics. Was the cavalry raid a legitimate military tactic, or was it a waste of essential resources? Pre-registration recommended but not required. To register or for more info, email us at tpearson@slpl.org.

Thursday, March 22, 2012, 10 am-Noon—Civil War 24/7: Researching Civil War Soldiers & Regiments on the Internet. Buder Branch. Join us as Tom Pearson discusses ways to thoroughly research Civil War soldiers and military units using the Internet (free and subscription sources discussed). Pre-registration recommended but not required. To register or for more info, email us at tpearson@slpl.org.

Free parking is available on Buder Branch parking lot.

More info here on SLPL branch library locations and hours of operation.

Tom Pearson, Reference Librarian
Special Collections Department
St. Louis Public Library

Thursday, November 10, 2011

I’M READY FOR MY CLOSE-UP…

The photos that accompany this blog post on the Spotsylvania battlefield reveal a little discussed aspect of well-preserved battlefields: careful examination of a battlefield can reveal scenes of great beauty:

LINK

CEDAR & VERNON COUNTY UPDATE

Their October 2011 newsletter is now posted online:

LINK

PWNED LIST

Has your email address been hacked? You can check on this list (it’s OK--they don’t ask for your password, only the account username). Receiving a clean bill of email health is not a 100% guarantee that your account is safe, of course-- but these folks deserve credit for providing an impressive database of compromised email account usernames. The site also serves as a good reminder that it’s probably best to change your email password every so often as a routine precaution:

LINK

NOTE: Pwn (past tense pwned) is hacker slang for controlling or compromising a computer or web server. It means controlling other persons the way pawns are controlled in a chess game.

SSDI NEWS

The Social Security Death Index is now somewhat smaller--but this blogger feels that most genealogists probably won't notice the difference:

LINK

LOC ILLUSTRATED TIMELINE OF THE CIVIL WAR

I own their previous Civil War Desk Reference publication—it’s a truly fabulous book!

To mark the sesquicentennial of the bloodiest conflict on American soil, the nation’s library, in collaboration with Little, Brown and Company, has published The Library of Congress Illustrated Timeline of the Civil War by Margaret E. Wagner, with an introduction by historian Gary W. Gallagher.

Drawn from rare source material in the unparalleled Civil War collections of the world’s largest library, The Library of Congress Illustrated Timeline of the Civil War is an authoritative and engaging chronological narrative of the conflict that raged across the United States from 1861-1865. Quotes from figures—both well-known and unsung—provide testaments to the war’s broad scope and complexity, and to the determination and valor that characterized the people on both sides of the conflict.

Among its panoply of illustrations—including some materials rarely seen and never- before published—readers will encounter manuscripts in Lincoln’s own hand, onsite drawings made by a Civil War combat artist, maps, color lithographs, political cartoons, posters, period photographs, and much more. Illustrations and text together reveal dimensions of this pivotal conflict not covered in standard Civil War histories.

The 240-page, hardcover volume, with more than 350 color illustrations, is available for $35 in bookstores nationwide and at the Library of Congress Shop, Washington, D.C., 20540-4985. Credit-card orders are taken at (888) 682-3557, or shop on the Internet at www.loc.gov/shop/.

LINK

NOTE: Also available in print from Amazon.com ($21.72) and BarnesandNoble.com ($22.29); or as a Kindle ebook ($16.99) or Nook ebook ($16.99) from those same sources.

Wednesday, November 09, 2011

KINGS OF CUT-RATE

The National Archives at Kansas City will host author Brian Burnes on Thursday, November 10 at 6:30 p.m. for a discussion of his book The Kings of Cut-Rate: The Very American Story of Isaac and Michael Katz. Burnes will be available to sign copies of his book after the discussion. A 6:00 p.m. reception will precede the event.

Burnes tells the story of Isaac and Michael Katz, who changed forever our definition of the drug store. Sons of immigrants, they started with a fruit stand in Kansas City’s West Bottoms. In 1914 they acquired two cigar stands downtown and turned them into drug stores. But that was just the beginning. Isaac, who walked with a limp and quit school at age 14 to sell newspapers on the railroad, hardly had a moment when he was not innovating. They expanded to two stores, four, then eight. Other druggists filled prescriptions, but Katz began stocking cameras, cosmetics, clocks, shirts, pets and the best selection of discounted smokes, beer and whiskey in town. They treated customers like kings. By 1970 they had 65 stores throughout the Midwest and annual sales of more than $100 million. “Let’s go to Katz” had become a refrain.

Copies of The Kings of Cut-Rate: The Very American Story of Isaac and Michael Katz will be available for purchase via The Kansas City Store onsite. For more information or to make a reservation for this free event call 816-268-8010 or email us here.

About the author
Brian Burnes is a native of St. Louis, Missouri and received his bachelors in journalism from the University of Missouri, and master’s degree from the University of Kansas. He has been a reporter at The Kansas City Star since 1978 and was named history reporter in 1993. He is the author of several books including Harry S. Truman: His Life and Times; Walt Disney's Missouri; and Great Plains Originals.

The National Archives at Kansas City is home to more than 50,000 cubic feet of historical records dating from the 1820s to the 1990s created or received by nearly 100 Federal agencies. Serving the Central Plains Region, the archives holds records from the states of Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota available for public access. The facility is located at 400 West Pershing Road, Kansas City, MO 64108. It is open to the public Tuesday-Saturday 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. for research, with the exhibits open from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. For more information, call 816-268-8000 or visit us here.

WHEN LOYALTY WAS NOT A VIRTUE

Jefferson Davis didn’t have lots of close friends—and his loyalty to the ones he had was a real impediment to Confederate victory in the Western Theater:

LINK

SECRETARIES OF WAR AND SECRETARIES OF THE ARMY

The GPO announces a new book that would make a great gift for the public library or archive of your choice:

LINK

CRUELTY AND KINDNESS

Teens online tend to experience both at the hands of peers and strangers—and not always in equal measure:

LINK

Tuesday, November 08, 2011

AN AUSPICIOUS UNDERTAKING

Did you know there’s a National Museum of Funeral History?

LINK

TURKEYS WHO MADE THE CUT

Actually, they're turkeys who didn't make the cut, so to speak...

A Presidential pardon from the man who made Thanksgiving a national holiday has spared this turkey, which can now be purchased at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum Store.

The soft, plush turkey, about the size of a softball, comes complete with a reproduction note from President Abraham Lincoln, who in 1863 proclaimed the first national Thanksgiving holiday. The note in Lincoln's handwriting reads:

"This turkey is pardoned by order of the President. A. Lincoln."

Lincoln is known to have pardoned a White House turkey with a note at the request of his son Tad, but that original note no longer exists.

The pardoned turkey may be purchased for $9.99 in the ALPL Museum Store, or on-line. On-line orders will also be charged shipping and handling.

The Museum Store will donate a portion of any "leftover" turkeys to the Toys for Tots holiday gift campaign after Thanksgiving.

GURULIB

If you’re like me, you own lots of books, CDs, and DVDs—and so are not always sure when you’re at the store if you own that sale item already or not. GuruLib can help you catalog your collection—you can enter items using a barcode scanner or barcode app for your mobile device:

LINK

NARA-KC TO OFFER FREE GENEALOGY WORKSHOPS IN NOVEMBER

The National Archives at Kansas City will be offering the following free Genealogy Workshops during November.

Saturday, November 12–10:00–11:30 a.m.–Military Records at the National Archives, presented by Archives Director Lori Cox-Paul – Military records, such as compiled service records and pension files, can provide valuable information to genealogists. During this workshop participants will be provided an overview of the different types of military service records available for research, where they are located, and how to request copies.

Tuesday, November 15–10:00–11:30 a.m.–Introduction to Genealogy, presented by Archives Specialist Jessica Edgar – Unsure where or how to begin researching your family history at the National Archives? Join Archives Specialist Jessica Edgar as she demonstrates how to navigate the United States Federal Census on Ancestry.com. Participants are invited to stay after class to use the public access computers in the genealogy research room to start their research.

Wednesday, November 30–10:00–11:30 a.m.–Introduction to Genealogy, presented by Archives Specialist Jessica Edgar – This workshop is a repeat of the above.

These workshops are free, but reservations are required. For more information or to make a reservation for these workshops call 816-268-8000 or email us here.

Additional information about the presenters:

Lori Cox-Paul is the Archives Director for the National Archives at Kansas City. In this capacity she plans, develops, and executes long- and short-range plans of the archival program for the Central Plains Region, including accessioning, arrangement, description, publication, reference, preservation, and public and educational outreach programs.

Jessica Edgar graduated from William Jewell College with degrees in Secondary Education and History. She started with the National Archives at Kansas City in January 2007. As an archives specialist, she answers reference requests, assists in marketing and public programming, and works with data management within the Archives record tracking systems.

The National Archives at Kansas City is home to more than 55,000 cubic feet of historical records dating from the 1820s to the 1990s created or received by nearly 100 Federal agencies. Serving the Central Plains Region, the archives holds records from the states of Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota. The facility is located at 400 West Pershing Road, Kansas City, MO 64108. It is open to the public Tuesday-Saturday 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. for research, with the exhibits open from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. For more information, call 816-268-8000 or visit us here.

Monday, November 07, 2011

REMEMBERING THE BIG ONE

Hello,

As you know, 2011 and 2012 mark the 200th anniversary of the mightiest earthquake ever recorded in North America, i.e., the New Madrid Earthquakes.

This year and next, a series of events will occur in the New Madrid area commemorating these quakes. Interest is always high in these epic quakes their impact on historic New Madrid, which was once destined to be the capital of New Spain. With the bicentennial of these quakes, awareness is at an all-time high.

This year's events will occur in New Madrid on the evenings of December 9, 10, and 16 (the exact dates of the first big quake and its major aftershocks). I am a descendant of at least two survivors of the big quakes, and will be at the New Madrid Historical Museum on Main Street signing my book about New Madrid. For information on all the happenings, contact the museum at 573 748-5944.

In 2009, the Southeast Missouri State University Press published my 328-page, Gateway Edition book, New Madrid: a Mississippi River Town in History and Legend. This book has been very popular and is now in its third printing. Your members or patrons would love reading this book, especially those with an interest in earthquakes, those whose ancestors made the westward trek, were American Indians, slaves, slave owners, participants in the Civil War; the Lewis and Clark Expedition, floods, or those simply interested in how life played out in mid-America in the 19th century.

Books are available @ $19 from the publisher, or you can order direct from Amazon.com or Barnes & Noble. An autographed copy is available from the author. Contact me here. Thank you for your interest, and for spreading the news about the New Madrid Earthquake Bicentennial and my book. As you know, New Madrid was one of the original five Spanish districts in Louisiana, and ancestors of many Missourians once lived in the New Madrid area.

Mary Sue Anton, 281 474-3373; author of New Madrid: A Mississippi River Town in History and Legend.

DO PDF

If you ever need to convert WORD, EXCEL, or POWERPOINT files to PDFs, doPDF makes it simple—and it’s free:

LINK

MISSOURI HISTORY MUSEUM UPDATE

I will be giving a lecture titled "Researching Your Civil War Ancestors" at the Missouri History Museum (in Forest Park), Tuesday, November 8, 6pm.

More info here.

Dennis Northcott
Associate Archivist for Reference
Missouri History Museum

IT’S THAT TIME AGAIN!

Reminder!

Members: your 2011 membership expires on December 31, 2011.

Membership types, cost per year, and benefits of each:

INDIVIDUAL---$20/yr; 4 Journals, 4 Newsletters; One vote, one Conference discount.

INSTITUTION---$20/yr; For libraries, societies. Same as individual. One vote that can be assigned to a representative.

FAMILY---$30/yr; 4 Journals, 4 Newsletters; Two votes, two Conference discounts.

CONTRIBUTING---$40/yr; Same as individual; donation advantages.

PATRON---$100/yr; Same as individual; plus 20% discount on publications [not to be used for resale]; and 20% discount on Annual Conference. Donation advantages.

LIFE---$400 one time. Same as individual; Retains active membership status for Life. Never needs renewing. Non-assignable.

FOREIGN---$40/yr. Same as individual.

Please indicate whether you prefer your newsletter to be e-mailed in PDF format or sent as a paper copy via U.S. mail. Circle the format you prefer:

E-mail or US mail

Your Journal is sent as a paper copy via U.S. mail (no PDF option at this point).

NAME ______________________________________________________________
ADDRESS ___________________________________________________________
CITY ___________________________ STATE ______ ZIP CODE __________
PHONE _____________________________________________________________
E-MAIL ____________________________________________________________

Include a check payable to: MOSGA

Mail to: Missouri State Genealogical Association, P.O. Box 833, Columbia, MO 65205-0833.

Thanks for your prompt attention to this matter, and happy holidays!

Thursday, November 03, 2011

MISSOURI HISTORY MUSEUM UPDATE

OPENING WEEKEND
The Civil War in Missouri
November 11 – 13

Historical authors offer presentations based on their books that tell the complex and heart-wrenching stories of what Missourians, and the armies of both sides, endured during the Civil War. Books will be available for purchase and authors will sign their works after their programs.

OPENING WEEKEND
Mammoths and Mastodons: Titans of the Ice Age
November 25 & 26

Join us for opening weekend activities throughout the Museum, including Theatre in the Museum, family films, documentary screenings, and make-and-take activities for kids.

LINK

BAD LUCK PRIVATE

Who was he? He enlisted in the Confederate army right after Fort Sumter and made it through four dangerous years of war only to be killed in action on 8 April 1865—the day before Lee surrendered to Grant at Appomattox Courthouse:

LINK

BIG NEED, EMPTY POCKETS

If you need a fairly expensive piece of software, but the economy has left your wallet or purse sad and lonely, there may be a free equivalent that will do the job nicely:

LINK

WORLD MEMORY PROJECT UPDATE

Information on Holocaust survivors and victims of Nazi persecution available online at no cost through efforts of World Memory Project

WASHINGTON, D.C./PROVO, Utah, November 2, 2011 – The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and Ancestry.com announced that material from four Museum collections containing information on more than 30,000 victims of Nazi persecution is now available online at Ancestry.com and can be searched at no cost. The collections contain information on thousands of individuals including displaced Jewish orphans; Czech Jews deported to the Terezin concentration camp and camps in occupied Poland; and French victims of Nazi persecution.

The collections are being made available through the World Memory Project, launched in May 2011. The project is recruiting the public to help build the world’s largest online resource on Jewish victims of the Holocaust and millions of non-Jews who were targeted for persecution by Nazi Germany and its collaborators, allowing victims’ families and survivors themselves to discover missing chapters of their history, learn the truth about the fate of their relatives and honor those who were lost.

World Memory Project contributors are continuously keying information that will form new searchable databases of historical collections when complete. To date, more than 2,100 contributors from around the world have indexed almost 650,000 records. Anyone, anywhere can contribute to the project by simply typing information from historical records into the online database.

“World Memory Project contributors are helping Holocaust survivors and their families learn the truth about what happened to loved ones,” says Lisa Yavnai, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum WMP project leader. “It is an incredible gift that anyone can give to those who survived the horrors of Nazi Germany. In a few months, the contributors’ efforts have resulted in more online searchable records than the Museum alone could have produced in many years.”

The World Memory Project utilizes proprietary software and project management donated by Ancestry.com, which hosts its own online archival project to transcribe historical records. Once Museum records are transcribed, the indices are hosted exclusively on Ancestry.com and are permanently free to search. The Museum provides copies of documents upon request at no cost. The original documentation remains in the Museum’s archival collection.

“We’ve been inspired by the steadfast efforts of the thousands of contributors who have in some cases spent hundreds of hours transcribing this important material,” remarked Tim Sullivan, CEO, Ancestry.com. “These early results would likely have taken years without the dedication of the many individuals who have embraced the mission of the World Memory Project.”

To find out more about the World Memory Project or to learn how to become a contributor, please go here.

What World Memory Project contributors are saying:

“I chose to try to make available to the public a few documents from Poland during WWII. I found it to be a very emotional and most privileged moment in my life.” ─ Valentina, Australia

“I feel privileged and honored to bring historical accuracy and facts to the many families out there today who may not have known, until now, what became of their family members. It was extremely important to me to key in these documents with the utmost care.” – Donna, United States

“…It brought home to me the fact that each of these names had been a person who probably once reached out with their hands to others for help, and for many of them, that help never came… Ultimately, though, I took comfort in the idea that, while he might have been among those who were taken from the world through bigotry and hatred, at least I was helping in a little way to make sure he and others like him were not forgotten.” ─ Kerri, United States

About the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

A living memorial to the Holocaust, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum inspires citizens and leaders worldwide to confront hatred, prevent genocide, and promote human dignity. Federal support guarantees the Museum’s permanent place on the National Mall, and its far-reaching educational programs and global impact are made possible by generous donors. For more information, go here.

About Ancestry.com

Ancestry.com Inc. (Nasdaq: ACOM) is the world's largest online family history resource, with more than 1.7 million paying subscribers. More than 7 billion records have been added to the site in the past 15 years. Ancestry users have created more than 28 million family trees containing over 2.8 billion profiles. Ancestry.com has local Web sites directed at nine countries that help people discover, preserve and share their family history, including its flagship Web site.

Forward-Looking Statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those anticipated by these forward-looking statements. Such risks and uncertainties include our continuing ability to acquire, digitize and make desired content conveniently available to our subscribers our ability to keep licensed content available after any finite license for that content expires and the effect on subscribers or potential subscribers of providing free content. Information concerning additional factors that could cause events or results to differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements is contained under the caption "Risk Factors" in our Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the period ended September 30, 2011, and in discussions in other of our SEC filings. These forward-looking statements should not be relied upon as representing our views as of any subsequent date and we assume no obligation to publicly update or revise these forward-looking statements.

Wednesday, November 02, 2011

CARONDELET THEN AND NOW

James Buchanan Eads built many of his ironclads in Carondelet, Missouri (just a few miles south of downtown St. Louis). There’s little evidence of that major Civil War industry remaining:

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EVENTFUL

You may want to check and see if Eventful covers events happening in your area—it definitely covers St. Louis and Kansas City metro areas, and I also found listings for Columbia and Kirksville:

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ROOTSTECH 2012

There’s still time (deadline 30 November 2011) to get a big discount on attendance at RootsTech 2012:

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MILITARY RECORDS WEBINAR

Free online video class from Ancestry.com:

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Monday, October 31, 2011

WHY DIDN’T HE JUST WADE ACROSS?

Why didn’t Ambrose Burnside just wade across Antietam Creek at a shallow point? Because crossing it with an army is a much more difficult proposition than is crossing a man, or even a regiment:

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THE LOCAL NEWS

What do people use their local TV news stations for? The weather, breaking news stories, and traffic updates—in that order. Where do they get most of their local news? From newspapers, oddly enough—although usually not in those large printed versions some of you may remember:

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PREROGATIVE COURT OF THE CANTERBURY WILLS

One of the most important record series the National Archives (UK) makes available to family historians is the Prerogative Court of Canterbury Wills, which spans almost 500 years and contains over 1 million wills. The wills are free to search, with a small fee to download a digital copy:

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Friday, October 28, 2011

SHOEBOXOLOGY AT THE MIDWEST GENEALOGY CENTER

Discover the Family Secrets Hidden in Your Shoebox with Shoeboxology!

1000 Memories, an affiliate of the Internet Archives, is offering a free scanning session at the Midwest Genealogy Center in Independence, Missouri, on November 19, 2011. The event starts with a class entitled, “Genealogy Clues In Your Family Shoebox” at 1:00 pm, followed by a tutorial on how to use the 1000 Memories website (a free password-protected website for sharing your genealogy) at 1:45 pm. Finally, you can scan your photos and documents from 2-4 p.m. with unlimited scanning. 1000 Memories premiered their site at the FGS Conference in Springfield in September.

Don’t miss out on this free opportunity! Call the library at 816-252-7228 for more information. Learn more about 1000 Memories on their website.

Thursday, October 27, 2011

THE HONG KONG COLONIAL CEMETERY

Free podcast available on the National Archives (UK) website:

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THE BOYS OF WAR

Boys under 18 years of age served on both sides during the Civil War. Many served as drummer boys, musicians, or messengers, but some served in the lines as combat soldiers:

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THE NEARLY PAPERLESS OFFICE

Let’s face it—you can’t totally eliminate paper documents from your life. That said, you most certainly can drastically reduce the amount of paper that you currently must deal with:

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WELCOME TO THE CENTRE FOR BATTLEFIELD ARCHAEOLOGY

Ah, if only this academic program at the University of Glasgow had existed when I was deciding what to do when I grew up:

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ALTON IN THE CIVIL WAR

Information on the Alton (IL) Civil War Prison, with a searchable database of persons confined there:

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ANCESTRY.COM ADDS MORE THAN 50 MILLION BIRTH, MARRIAGE, AND DEATH RECORDS

New Collections from 23 States include records on famous Americans like John Wayne, Clark Gable and Ernest Hemingway

PROVO, UTAH – (October 27, 2011) – Ancestry.com, the world’s largest online family history resource, today announced it has added 53 new historical vital record collections to its nearly half billion U.S. vital records, the largest searchable online collection of its kind. The foundation of family history research, civil vital records – recordings of births, marriages and deaths – were typically created at or near the time of the event and serve as an essential resource for the millions of Americans who are beginning or continuing their family history research. The new additions encompass 23 states, include more than 50 million historical records dating from the 1600s (some of the oldest U.S. records available) through to 2010 and have been made available through partnerships with state and local archives, county offices and newspapers. Many notable Americans can be found in the collections, including John Wayne, Ernest Hemingway, Clark Gable, Spencer Tracy, Judy Garland and many more.

Interesting facts presented by these records include John Wayne’s birth name as Marion Robert Morrison, changed to the legendary stage name when he began working in Hollywood. “Gone with the Wind” star Clark Gable hailed from the small village of Cadiz, Ohio according to the Ohio Births and Christening Index (1800-1962). The Minnesota Birth and Christening Records (1840-1980) show that “The Wizard of Oz” star Judy Garland’s given birth name was Frances Gumm.

These new vital record collections are available to all current Ancestry.com subscribers and can be found at www.ancestry.com/vitals. As always, Ancestry.com is free of charge for 14 days to all new users.

Vital records contain a wide variety of valuable information. Birth records can include information about baptisms and christenings, as well as birth certificates and registers. Marriage records tend to be the oldest vital records and can include consent affidavits - typically for individuals under legal age, declarations of intent, banns, bonds, contracts, licenses, certificates, registers and returns. Death records may include death certificates, burial records, cemetery records, and other documents such as probate records, court minutes, and coroner's records.

Traditionally, vital records in the U.S. have been created and maintained locally by multiple entities—churches, town clerks, justices of the peace and others. With no single source for information, research has previously been time intensive, requiring countless hours and travel to make and confirm discoveries.

With the digitization of millions of these valuable records, Ancestry.com has simplified the process to a click of a mouse and keyboard. Interest and curiosity in family history research is growing rapidly, evidenced by a recent Harris Interactive survey that revealed four in five Americans are interested in learning about their family history and three out of four claiming that knowing their family history is important to them.[1]

“Vital records are among the most valuable genealogical resources for proving or disproving other sources, giving a more complete picture of ancestors, helping distinguish between different people with the same names and finding clues about earlier life events,” said Tennessee Secretary of State Tre Hargett, whose office oversees the Tennessee State Library and Archives. “By compiling such a massive collection, spanning not only different locales, but centuries of essential information, Ancestry.com is making it possible for anyone to learn more about family history.”

Some of the new vital record collections now available on Ancestry.com date well back into the 17th Century including:

• Connecticut, Deaths and Burials, 1650-1934: Town clerks began recording births, marriages and deaths by 1650. These records are derived from microfilmed records of deaths and burials. This collection includes legendary names such as P.T. Barnum of circus fame and dictionary pioneer Noah Webster.
• Maryland, Births and Christenings, 1662–1911: This collection is extracted from more than 200,000 Maryland birth, baptism, and christening records sourced from church, civil and family records. This collection includes the birth of John Hanson, President of early America’s Continental Congress.
• New Hampshire, Death and Burial Records, 1654–1949: New Hampshire’s earliest records were in the mid-1600s, though laws requiring a statewide compilation of records were not passed until 1866.
• New Hampshire, Marriage Records, 1637–1947: Records in this collection are derived from certificates of intention of marriage and certificates of marriage for more recent years.
• New Jersey, Births and Christenings, 1660–1931: This collection is comprised of more than 2.3 million birth, baptism, and christening records. Information found here may include name, gender, race and birthplace.

“The United States possesses a unique history and vital records offer an accurate, in-depth look into the lives of individuals, families and the nation as a whole,” said Josh Hanna, Executive Vice President, Ancestry.com. “Ancestry.com is committed to the continued expansion of our vital record collections and increasing the breadth of information for all Americans looking to learn more about their past.”

Tuesday, October 25, 2011

NAPOLEON’S NIGHTMARE

Russian winter was no picnic, either...

Guerrilla warfare is nothing new. Napoleon encountered it in Spain starting in 1808, after he betrayed the Spanish monarch, who had just helped him conquer Portugal:

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BEHAVING DURING THE BLITZ

Did Liverpudlians mind their manners during the World War II blitz? This free podcast uses case studies from police records to help answer that question:

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CASTLE GARDEN

CastleGarden.org is an educational project of The Battery Conservancy. This free site offers access to an extraordinary database of information on 11 million immigrants from 1820 through 1892, the year Ellis Island opened. Over 100 million Americans can trace their ancestors to this early immigration period:

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TOP 100 WEBSITES AT YOUR FINGERTIPS

This list is a bit dated, perhaps--but the convenience can't be beat:

In 2010, PC Magazine created its list of the Top 100 Websites. They also created a Favorites Installer that will automatically add the Top 100 to Internet Explorer or Firefox:

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NOTHING SUCCEEDS LIKE DEFEAT

His raid was a tactical debacle—his followers nearly to a man were killed, wounded, or captured. He was himself hanged shortly thereafter. But he got what he really wanted anyway: a bloody civil war that freed millions of slaves in this country:

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Monday, October 24, 2011

IT’S IN THE BAG

The body bag was a product of necessity—the Civil War produced lots of bodies that needed to be shipped home:

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BAPTISM OF FIRE

The men of the 44th Missouri Infantry Regiment were combat virgins—until the Battle of Franklin, Tennessee, that is, when the men of the regiment found themselves occupying the exact spot where Confederates under Major General John Brown repeatedly attempted to break through the Union line:

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STEVE JOBS AND OUR INNOVATION NATION

Post on the Government Book Talk blog about Jobs and the role the GPO has played as incubator of innovation:

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NOTE: My own Apple story: I was running a small public library in South Dakota in the early 1980s, and we had just bought an Apple IIe for the library. After it was set up for us, I walked back to the library that night in a snowstorm (I walked because cars were banned from the streets during the storm) in order to use the Apple IIe. A fairly dumb thing to do? Of course—but this story certainly serves as a testament to the strength of the Apple brand even in those early days of its ascendency!

What, by the way, was I doing with that Apple IIe as the snow piled up against the library doors? Why, I was playing games—we had purchased several Infocom titles, and Murder By the Dozen, as I recall..

THE CASE OF THE DISAPPEARING DOCUMENTS

Federal investigators think a long-time document collector of presidential memorabilia and his associate may have “borrowed” thousands of historical documents from archives all along the East Coast:

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2012 CIVIL WAR INSTITUTE

If you’re a Civil War nut (or inadvertently married one), this will likely be of interest:

DATES: June 22-26, 2012

Speakers:

Brooks Simpson - U. S. Grant and Shiloh

Peter Carmichael - Stonewall Jackson’s execution of deserters

Allen Guelzo - General McClellan’s Coup

Susannah Ural - The destruction of Hood’s Texas Brigade at Antietam

Caroline Janney - How Americans have remembered emancipation

Battlefield tours:

Fredericksburg
Walk along the Sunken Road at Marye’s Heights

Second Manassas
Examine Stonewall Jackson’s defense along the famous Unfinished Railroad

Antietam
Explore the Cornfield, Bloody Lane, and Burnside Bridge

War College Staff Ride of Antietam
Study the battlefield from the perspective of the modern U.S. military

Find out more about the 2012 CWI Conference including registration information:

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Friday, October 21, 2011

THE DEVIL IN MASSACHUSETTS

This well-done account of the Salem witch trials is available full-text online:

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AN INSTITUTION TO WHICH THE NAME HOSPITAL SHOULD NOT BE APPLIED

Many of the UK military hospitals covered in this 1902 report would more likely kill than cure you:

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BRITISH MILITARY HOSPITALS IN 1899

A complete list, with number of beds each:

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CLASSIC SHELL

If you’re currently running Windows 7 or Windows Vista, but miss the look and feel of Windows XP, Classic Shell can make you believe you’ve got Windows XP up and running once again:

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GENEALOGY SOFTWARE SMACKDOWN

Before you buy genealogy software, check this Wikipedia comparison chart to see which application best suits your needs. You may also find that a free application does most or all of the jobs that need doing:

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DEATH ON THE DARK RIVER

In late April 1865, a steamboat filled with recently freed Union Army POWs blew up—with tragic results:

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THE RIVER KWAI RECORDER

He risked torture and execution in order to compile a list of prisoners forced by the Japanese to help construct the infamous Burma Thai Railroad:

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