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Monday, July 26, 2010

OPERA MINI

Need a fast browser with a small footprint for your laptop or mobile phone? Opera Mini may be what you’re looking for:

LINK

MAKING THE MOST OF GRAVEYARD PHOTO OPS

If you’re going on a cemetery scavenger hunt soon, here are tips on getting great tombstone photos:

LINK

GOOGLE DIRECTORY: MAGAZINES & E-ZINES

There are certainly plenty of listings:

LINK

LEARNING A FOREIGN LANGUAGE

Trying to learn a foreign language? These mnemonic tricks may help:

LINK

Friday, July 23, 2010

VIRTUAL COOPERSTOWN

If you or a loved one is a baseball nut, take a look at the Baseball Fall of Fame website:

LINK

GOOGLE EDITIONS

Never heard of it? Since it’s going to change the way many of us acquire books, you may want to read all about it:

LINK

TRI-COUNTY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY UPDATE

Hello:

The July 2010 Tri-County Genealogical Society Newsletter has been posted on our website at http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~motcogs/

Regards,
Nancy Thompson
Tri-County Genealogical Society
218 W. Walnut St., Nevada, MO 64772
web: www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~motcogs/
email: tricountygenealogy@centurytel.net

WABASH VALLEY VISIONS AND VOICES

Wabash Visions & Voices focuses on the Wabash Valley region in west central Indiana and east central Illinois. The digital collection contains artifacts, administrative and personal papers, manuscripts, photographs, texts, yearbooks, maps, oral histories, and other audio/video files. Genealogical resources are not included.

LINK

LINGUISTS LED THE WAY!

Japanese-American Army volunteers helped us win the war in the Pacific:

LINK

ST. LOUIS PUBLIC LIBRARY CLASSES

Hello to all,

1. SLPL CLASSES

The August Check-It-Out bulletin sent to SLPL patrons lists two classes I am supposedly teaching at Buder Branch Library during that month. The closure of Central Library has forced me to change my class schedule. I just don't have time to prepare any new classes at this point-- I can only offer classes that I have taught previously. The following list includes the ONLY classes I am scheduled to teach at Buder during August-December 2010. Please disregard ANY other listings you may come across. Thanks!

Classes listed are sponsored by St. Louis Public Library, and are free and open to the public.

Thurs August 26 10 a.m.-Noon. Killed by the Cure: Civil War Medicine. Join us as we discuss the injuries and diseases that plagued Civil War soldiers, and the (sometimes fatal) methods Civil War doctors used to try and heal them. Buder Branch. To register or for more information, email me at tpearson@slpl.org.

Sat October 30 10 a.m.-Noon. The Witches of Salem Village. Join us as we discuss witchcraft and witch trials in Europe and North America; the witch trials in Salem, Massachusetts in 1692; and ways to research ancestors who were accused as witches. Buder Branch. To register or for more information, email me at tpearson@slpl.org.

Thurs November 18 10 a.m.-Noon. Research at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library. Join us as we discuss the wealth of resources for the genealogist and historian available at this Springfield, Illinois institution. Buder Branch. To register or for more information, email me at tpearson@slpl.org.

Sat December 18 10 a.m.-Noon. He's a Rebel: Researching Confederate Ancestors. Join us as we discuss various ways that genealogists can find books, microfilms, manuscripts, photographs, newspapers, and Internet sites that offer information about Confederate soldier ancestors. Buder Branch. To register or for more information, email me at tpearson@slpl.org.

Buder Branch
4401 Hampton Avenue
St. Louis, MO 63109

Pre-registration is recommended. To register or for more information, please email me. Parking on the Buder Branch lot is always free.

It's easy to add you to my programs notification list. Just email me at tpearson@slpl.org and use NOTIFY in the subject line- that's all you need to do!

2. CLASSES AT OTHER LOCATIONS

I will also be teaching these classes at non-SLPL locations. Maybe there's one near you!

Classes listed are co-sponsored by St. Louis Public Library, and are free and open to the public. Please note that locations for classes vary.

Thurs October 14 2 p.m.-3:30 p.m. Greatest Generation: Researching WWII Ancestors. Join us as we discuss various ways that genealogists can find books, microfilms, manuscripts, photographs, newspapers, and Internet sites that offer information about WWII ancestors. Belleville Public Library, 121 E. Washington, Belleville, IL 62220. To register or for more information, email me at tpearson@slpl.org.

Weds October 20 6:30 p.m.-8:00 p.m. Hoe! Hoe! Hoe! Researching Farmers & Other Rural Ancestors. Join us as we discuss various ways that genealogists can find books, microfilms, manuscripts, photographs, newspapers, and Internet sites that offer information about ancestors who owned / worked farms or other agricultural ventures. Hayner Public Library, 326 Belle Street, Alton, IL 62002. To register or for more information, email me at tpearson@slpl.org.

Thurs November 4 7:30 p.m.-9:00 p.m. Thirteen Dollars a Month: Recruiting, Enlistment, Conscription, & Desertion in the American Civil War. Join us at this monthly meeting of the St. Clair County Genealogical Society as we discuss how they joined the army during the Civil War; what they got paid for doing so; and how some of them took the money and ran. St. Luke's Parish Hall, 301 N. Church Street, Belleville, IL 62220. To register or for more information, email me at tpearson@slpl.org.

Sat November 20 Meeting starts 10 a.m.; talk at 10:30 a.m. Hoe! Hoe! Hoe! Researching Farmers & Other Rural Ancestors. Join us at this monthly meeting of the St. Louis Genealogical Society as we discuss various ways that genealogists can find books, microfilms, manuscripts, photographs, newspapers, and Internet sites that offer information about ancestors who owned / worked farms or other agricultural ventures. St. Louis County Library, 1640 S. Lindbergh, St. Louis, MO 63131. To register or for more information, email me at tpearson@slpl.org.

3. StLGS BOOK FAIR

I will be an exhibitor at the St. Louis Genealogical Society Book Fair on Sunday, December 5th, 1-3 PM. This event takes place at their headquarters (#4 Sunnen Drive, Suite 140, St. Louis, Mo. 63143). Stop by and say hello if you're in the neighborhood- it's a great opportunity to pick up signed books for the genealogists or history buffs on your Christmas list!

Tom Pearson
Reference Librarian
St. Louis Public Library
1301 Olive St.
St. Louis, MO 63103
www.slpl.org

Wednesday, July 21, 2010

EFFECTIVELY ERASING FILES

Cyber Security Tip ST05-011

Before selling or discarding an old computer, or throwing away a disk or CD, you naturally make sure that you've copied all of the files you need. You've probably also attempted to delete your personal files so that other people aren't able to access them. However, unless you have taken the proper steps to make sure the hard drive, disk, or CD is erased, people may still be able to resurrect those files.

Where do deleted files go?

When you delete a file, depending on your operating system and your settings, it may be transferred to your trash or recycle bin. This "holding area" essentially protects you from yourself--if you accidentally delete a file, you can easily restore it. However, you may have experienced the panic that results from emptying the trash bin prematurely or having a file seem to disappear on its own. The good news is that even though it may be difficult to locate, the file is probably still somewhere on your machine. The bad news is that even though you think you've deleted a file, an attacker or other unauthorized person may be able to retrieve it.

What are the risks?

Think of the information you have saved on your computer. Is there banking or credit card account information? Tax returns? Passwords? Medical or other personal data? Personal photos? Sensitive corporate information? How much would someone be able to find out about you or your company by looking through your computer files?

Depending on what kind of information an attacker can find, he or she may be able to use it maliciously. You may become a victim of identity theft. Another possibility is that the information could be used in a social engineering attack. Attackers may use information they find about you or an organization you're affiliated with to appear to be legitimate and gain access to sensitive data (see Avoiding Social
Engineering and Phishing Attacks for more information).

Can you erase files by reformatting?

Reformatting your hard drive or CD may superficially delete the files, but the information is still buried somewhere. Unless those areas of the disk are effectively overwritten with new content, it is still possible that knowledgeable attackers may be able to access the information.

How can you be sure that your information is completely erased?

Some people use extreme measures to make sure their information is destroyed, but these measures can be dangerous and may not be completely successful. Your best option is to investigate software programs and hardware devices that claim to erase your hard drive or CD. Even so, these programs and devices have varying levels of effectiveness. When choosing a software program to perform this task, look for the following characteristics:

*data is written multiple times - It is important to make sure that not only is the information erased, but new data is written over it. By adding multiple layers of data, the program makes it difficult for an attacker to "peel away" the new layer. Three to seven passes is fairly standard and should be sufficient.

*use of random data- Using random data instead of easily identifiable patterns makes it harder for attackers to determine the pattern and discover the original information underneath.

*use of zeros in the final layer- Regardless of how many times the program overwrites the data, look for programs that use all zeros in the last layer. This adds an additional level of security.

While many of these programs assume that you want to erase an entire disk, there are programs that give you the option to erase and overwrite individual files.

An effective way to ruin a CD or DVD is to wrap it in a paper towel and shatter it. However, there are also hardware devices that erase a CD and DVD by destroying its surface. Some of these devices actually shred the media itself, while others puncture the writable surface with a pattern of holes. If you decide to use one of these devices, compare the various features and prices to determine which option best suits your needs.

Authors: Mindi McDowell, Matt Lytle

Produced 2005 by US-CERT, a government organization.

Note: This tip was previously published and is being re-distributed to increase awareness.

Terms of use: http://www.us-cert.gov/legal.html

This document can also be found at: http://www.us-cert.gov/cas/tips/ST05-011.html

GETTING YOUR FINANCIAL HOUSE IN ORDER

Whether you handle your personal accounts, or those of your church or society, you can use your computer to help get those accounts to balance:

LINK

DICTER

It’s a translation app (free) that allows one-click translations using any Windows operating system:

LINK

Tuesday, July 20, 2010

APP INVENTOR FOR GOOGLE ANDROID

If you own an Android phone, or were thinking about buying one, this may interest you. This Google Beta offering allows people with NO programming knowledge or experience to design apps for the Android:

LINK

INDIANA MEMORY

I hope all you folks with Hoosier ancestors have found the guide to Indiana digital collections at:

LINK

NOTE: It includes links to maps, Civil War letters, newspapers, oral histories, and much more!

TAME YOUR PILES…

Of paper, that is. If your house is cluttered with stack upon stack of tax records, bank statements, and genealogy materials, there is a way to digitize that stuff and kiss the paper logjam goodbye:

LINK

DISK DEFRAG SCREEN SAVER

Forgot to launch a defragmenter again? Auslogics Disk Defrag Screen Saver will do it for you automatically! When your system is idle, it defragments your disks in Screen Saver mode, displaying an amazing real-time fragmentation map. When you start to use the computer again, it suspends operation until the computer is idle again!

With this (free) tool you can be sure you’ll get top performance from your hard drives. Defragmentation has never been so easy!

LINK

Friday, July 16, 2010

ATLAS OF HISTORICAL COUNTY BOUNDARIES

Atlas of Historical County Boundaries now available online

The Newberry Library is pleased to announce the completion and release of its Digital Atlas of Historical County Boundaries, a dataset that covers every day-to-day change in the size, shape, location, name, organization, and attachment of each U.S. county and state from the creation of the first county in 1634 through 2000.

Nearly every aspect of American life can be described, analyzed, and illuminated through data gathered and organized by county or available in county records, and knowing how and when boundaries changed is often the key to finding and understanding great quantities of historical data.

For example, a farm may have been in one family for many generations, but over the decades changes in county lines may have effectively moved that farm from one county to another. When looking for old family records, how does the modern genealogist know which county seat will hold great-grandmother’s marriage certificate? How does an attorney know which county seat recorded the deed to great-great-grandfather’s farm?

In addition, population figures are commonly aggregated at the county level, but comparing statistics from one enumeration to the next may not accurately reveal actual change. Was a change in the figures from census to census due to population movement or to a change in the boundaries of the reporting counties, or to a combination of both?

With the Newberry?s Atlas of Historical County Boundaries, genealogists, geographers, historians, political scientists, attorneys, demographers, and many more now can find accurate county data that will greatly assist them in their research.

The data are organized by state and are available online in four versions:

* Viewable, interactive maps (electronic analogues to printed maps) on which the historical lines have been plotted against a background of the modern county network

* Downloadable shapefiles for use in geographic information systems (GIS)

* Downloadable KMZ files for use with Google Earth

* Downloadable and printable PDF files (each full-page frame shows a map of a different version of each county, with the historical boundaries displayed against a background of the modern county network)

Supplementing the polygons and maps for each state are chronologies, commentary on historical problems, long and short metadata documents, and a bibliography.

The project began in 1988, with principal funding provided by the National Endowment for the Humanities, an independent federal agency. Additional support came from the Newberry Library, which also served as headquarters, and from other foundations and individuals. The Newberry Library is the copyright holder; all files of the Digital Atlas of Historical County Boundaries are free for use under an Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 Creative Commons License. Queries should be addressed to scholl@newberry.org. The Website for the Atlas is here:

LINK

Douglas Knox
Director of Publication and Digital Initiatives
The Newberry Library
60 West Walton Street
Chicago, IL 60610

ATTENTION AUTHORS!

Submit Your Book to the Missouri State Genealogical Association’s (MoSGA) Library Program.

The MoSGA Library program is seeking complimentary copies of recently published books on family histories, genealogies, local histories, and any other books relevant to genealogists. Every book will be reviewed in the MoSGA Journal, and a copy of the review will be sent to the author.

A bookplate naming the donor will be placed in the book and the book will be placed in the circulating collection at the Midwest Genealogy Center of the Mid-Continent Public Library, Independence, Missouri. This collection is available for use at the library, and more importantly, available for interlibrary loan, reaching genealogy patrons across the United States.

Please include with the book the following information: title, author(s)/ editor(s)/ compiler(s), place of publication, publisher/self-published, year of publication, contact/ordering information, including price and shipping.

For more information contact Jean Foster Kelley, MoSGA Library Director, by email at jean@fosterkelley.com. Book donations should be mailed to MoSGA Library Director, P.O. Box 833, Columbia, MO 65205-0833.

MoSGA ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2010

Missouri State Genealogical Association
2010 Conference Schedule
Friday, August 13-Saturday August 14, 2010

FRIDAY— 13 AUGUST 2010

9:30-11:30 Pre-conference Workshops (Additional $20 fee)

Workshop 1: If You Don’t Tell the Story, Who Will? With Marilyn Collins. The search for family ancestors is the primary focus of genealogists. This workshop comes into play after the charts are complete. Learn how to write the story of a family, town, church, people, or events.

Workshop 2: When the Records Didn’t’ Get It Right, with Mary Celeste, MLS. If your family consists of names, dates, and places only, you may have missed out on really getting to know some interesting characters. In this workshop you will be inspired to roll up your sleeves, dust off your resources, call your cousins, and get back into the research mode. This is an interactive program.

9:30-1:00 -- Registration

1:00-2:00-- Conference Begins

Keynote Presentation: Civil Records in Germany, Roger Minert

2:30-3:30-- Breakout sessions

Researching Your Missouri Czech (Bohemian) Immigrant, June Sommer, MLS

Searching High and Low: Using Cartographic Records in Genealogical Research, Patricia M. Luebbert

4:00-5:00-- Breakout sessions

Overcoming Brick Walls When Researching Our Family History, Gene Block

The Rope and the Open Square: Civil War Crime and Punishment, Tom Pearson, MLS

6:00-- Banquet: Self-Defeating Behaviors in German Family History Research, Roger Minert

SATURDAY-- AUGUST 14, 2010

8:00-9:00-- Registration

8:30-9:30-- Troubleshooting in Germanic Family History Research, Roger Minert

10:00-11:00-- Breakout sessions

History Through Genealogy—Researching “Dred and Harriet Scott: Their Family Story,” Ruth Ann (Abels) Hager, CG, CGL [Book signing to follow]

St Louis At War, 1861-1865,Tom Pearson, MLS

11:30-1:00-- Luncheon and Annual Meeting

1:15-2:15-- Surname Changes in Northwestern Germany, Roger Minert

2:45-3:45-- Breakout sessions

Heritage Societies, Certificate Programs, and Lineage Research Projects, Mary Celeste, MLS

Ireland Here and There, Suzanne Vinduska and Maria Forsha

Registration info is here.

WARTIME INTERNMENT CAMPS IN AUSTRALIA

Online exhibit on the camps that operated in Australia during World Wars I and II. The National Archives (AUS) also holds records pertaining to Australians who were interned by the Japanese during World War II:

LINK

FROM EUROPE TO AUSTRALIA

Online exhibit that shows examples of the types of documents generated when a German family migrated to Australia during the 1950s:

LINK

ONLINE EXHIBITS AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES (AUS)

A list of online exhibits available on the National Archives (Australia) website:

LINK

Thursday, July 15, 2010

SCHWARZ FUNERAL HOME RECORDS

Records of this O’Fallon (IL) business for 1902-1910 are now available online courtesy of the present business owner and St. Clair County (IL) Genealogical Society:

LINK

SEXTON’S BOOK, WALNUT HILL CEMETERY

Listings for this book are now online, thanks to St. Clair (IL) County Genealogical Society:

LINK

NOTE: These listings are especially important because headstones no longer exist for many of the persons listed.

ONLINE EXHIBITIONS AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES (UK)

It really is an extensive list of online exhibitions available, including the appropriately named Horrors of the National Archives:

LINK

TOPICS GUIDE TO THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES (UK) WEBSITE

Just what it says:

LINK

SAVING AUDIOCASSETTES THE DIGITAL WAY

Have a big collection of audiocassettes that you were about to throw away? You can probably convert them to digital format if you so choose:

LINK

JOE’S GOALS

Do you have things you want to accomplish, but sometimes find it to keep track/make time? If so, Joe’s Goals is a simple but useful online application that can help you stay on track/make the time:

LINK

Monday, July 12, 2010

I’M IN TROUBLE, DAVE…

The National Security Agency (NSA) is apparently working on a system that will allow computers in vital installations like power grids and nuclear plants to realize that hackers are trying to gain access. The computer in trouble can then “call for help.”

As they say, when contacted about this story, an NSA spokesperson refused to confirm or deny its accuracy:

LINK

NEED AN ELECTRONIC GADGET? BETTER BUY IT SOON…

Or you’ll probably pay more for it. Workers in China are agitating for higher wages, and corporations like Apple will likely stick you with the increased cost rather than take one for the team:

LINK

MISSOURI OMNI RESEARCH SITE

If you’re researching Missouri ancestors, you’ll be interested in Tom Caulley’s Missouri Omni Research Site:

LINK

ERASERDROP

If you need to delete sensitive/confidential files on a regular basis, you should know that Recycle Bin does delete them- but not right away. Anybody with the right software can retrieve those “deleted” files until your computer needs that space again and finally overwrites them. EraserDrop is similar to Recycle Bin, except that it overwrites the files you drag to it immediately, rather than waiting until the computer needs that space again.

LINK

NOTE: In the case of files you might possibly need again, you could drag them to Recycle Bin until you’re sure they’re no longer necessary, then dump them into EraserDrop!

Friday, July 09, 2010

101 BEST GENEALOGY WEBSITES

Family Tree magazine’s best list for 2010:

LINK

DEATHSWITCH

If you live alone, you may have wondered at some point what will happen if you die at home before being able to call for help. You probably don’t want your remains to lie unattended for days or even longer. The matter becomes even more urgent if you have pets that need regular feeding and routine care.

One solution: join Deathswitch. What is Deathswitch? It’s an online service that sends a message to you on a regular basis (you choose the frequency- daily, weekly, monthly, etc.). If you don’t respond to that message with the password you’ve chosen, Deathswitch sends an email that you’ve previously composed to the person/organization that you’ve previously chosen.

The basic service (one email- no attachments- to one person) is free. Their premium service allows you to send up to 30 messages (with attachments) to up to 10 persons per message.

Need more info? Go here:

LINK

THEY OUGHT TO BE IN PICTURES

Family Tree Magazine is putting together a Civil War commemorative calendar for 2011, and they’d like to feature your Civil War-era ancestor (man, woman, or child). To enter your ancestor’s photo, just upload it to Flickr. You’ll need a Flickr account to do so, but the basic Flickr account is free:

LINK

DON’T TOSS THAT OLD CELL PHONE…

Without making sure that its next owner can’t use it to steal your identity. Your cell phone is in fact a small computer, and it stores data just like any other computer. You can fairly easily wipe that data before disposing of the cell phone, however:

LINK

DIGITAL CAMERAS FOR THE TECHNO-IMPAIRED

If you’d like to get a digital camera, but are a little apprehensive about being able to figure it out (or if you have physical issues to cope with), Kim Komando’s tips should help you select a digital camera that’s right for you:

LINK

Wednesday, July 07, 2010

ANCESTORS ONBOARD

Looking for someone who left the British Isles by boat during the period 1890-1960? Then this website should prove of great interest. You can search for free- but a copy of the passenger list in question will cost you:

LINK

NOTE: Search results provide year of birth, year of journey, port of departure, destination, and port of arrival.

BEYOND THE BASICS AT ACPL

If you’re planning a trip to Fort Wayne (IN) in September 2010:

Genealogy Center Mini-Course: Beyond the Basics

The popular mini-course, "Family History: Beyond the Basics," will be offered September 17 & 18, 2010. Instructors Margery Graham, CG and Steve Myers, MLS will share their knowledge as well as guide tours of the Genealogy Center and provide assisted research and personal consultations. "Family History: Beyond the Basics" will cover the following topics.

Day One:

Session 1: Problem Solving: Breaking through Brick Walls in Your Research – Every family historian eventually encounters obstacles in their research that seem insurmountable. Learn some basic strategies for tackling these so-called "brick walls" that can lead you to genealogical breakthroughs.

Session 2: Probate Records - Learn how to find and use wills, administrations and guardianships, as well as the other "goodies" contained in probate records.

Session 3: Land Records and Tax Lists - Learn the basics of land descriptions and how deed and land grant records, as well as associated tax lists, can all help advance your research.

Day Two:

Session 4: Military Records - Following an overview of military record sources, learn the basics of researching ancestors who served in the American Civil War (1861-1865) and in the American Revolutionary War (1775-1783).

Session 5: Church Records - Learn how to identify, locate and use these important sources of early birth, marriage and death information for a time period that pre-dates government registration of so-called "vital records."

Session 6: Tracing Your Ancestors Across the Atlantic - Learn how to find and use the many sources that bear on this crucial research step. Naturalization records, passenger lists, European emigration records and other sources will be discussed.

This course will be in Room BC of the Main Library, 900 Library Plaza, Fort Wayne, Indiana. The registration fee for the "Family History: Beyond the Basics" mini-course is $50. Checks should be made payable to "ACPL Foundation" and mailed to: Genealogy Center, Allen County Public Library, P.O. Box 2270, Fort Wayne, IN 46801-2270. Mini-course attendance will be limited, so register early to avoid disappointment. Additional information and a workshop schedule will be posted soon on our Web site at www.acpl.lib.in.us/genealogy/programs.html.

STYKZ

Want to pep up a website, or just like to doodle? Stykz allows you to create stick figure animations- and you don’t need to know much about art or animation to get started:

LINK

ORAL HISTORY WORKSHOP AT MGC

In an effort to see how well the consultation rooms at Midwest Genealogy Center can function as sites for oral history interviews, a trial was conducted with brother and sister, Harold L. van Tuyl and Mona van Tuyl Jones. They were asked to bring mementoes relating to their personal experiences during World War II. He enlisted and served in the U.S. Navy in the Pacific. She worked in the potato fields here in Jackson County with German and Italian prisoners of war.

This was also a chance to see the work of Mark Meisenheimer and John Woods, videographers. Mark will be conducting a class about recording family stories at the Midwest Genealogy Center on Sunday, 12 September, at 1:30 pm. He will talk about the mechanics of recording family members, and a MGC staff member will explain how to reserve one of the consultation rooms. This class is open to the public; please call 816-252-7228 to reserve your seat.

Click here for MCG Programs list.

Angela McComas
Reference Assistant, Programming
Midwest Genealogy Center
Mid-Continent Public Library
3440 S Lee's Summit Road
Independence, MO 64055
http://mcpl.lib.mo.us

Tuesday, July 06, 2010

FONTSTRUCT

Can’t find a font you really like? Then make your own:

LINK

GRIERSON DAYS RE-ENACTMENT

Jacksonville, Illinois just hosted this re-enactment. Why Jacksonville? Because Grierson lived there and is buried there, that’s why! Who was Grierson, you ask? Why, he led the famous Union cavalry raid into Mississippi and Louisiana that diverted thousands of rebel troops from Grant’s successful effort to capture Vicksburg- it’s the subject of a very good John Wayne movie, The Horse Soldiers:

LINK

IMDB review of The Horse Soldiers movie:

LINK

COMPUTER JARGON MADE SIMPLE

If you’re new to computing (or simply don’t understand a lot of the techno-babble you hear), this intro to computing terminology should help clear things up for you:

LINK

Friday, July 02, 2010

VET FINALLY GETS THE HONORS HE DESERVES

No, he’s not a vet of WWII or Korea-- this man served in the Black Hawk War (1832):

LINK

HE PICKED UP LITTER

No, not road trash-- this man served in the Civil War Ambulance Corps as a stretcher-bearer, and used slings known as litters to pick up wounded men. During the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain (1864), he and his fellow stretcher-bearer carried 16 men to a field hospital 1 ½ miles away:

LINK

SCAMMERS USE PHONES, TOO…

An old phone scam is making a comeback. You get a call, purportedly from the Make-a-Wish Foundation, that says you’ve won a sweepstakes. You stand to collect $350,000. All you need to do is wire them a payment for "taxes" or "insurance" in order to collect your money. A variation involves them requesting a credit number and expiration date so that they can “charge your account.” The better scammers even give you phone numbers with legit sounding area codes you can call to "verify" the insurance or tax charges being requested. The phone numbers provided, of course, are those of other persons involved in the scam.

LINK

What’s wrong with this picture?

1. You don’t remember entering such a contest;
2. They’re asking for money that you must pay upfront before you can claim your “prize.”

A retired teacher in Pennsylvania lost $23,000 to this scam.

How can you protect yourself? The old advice is still true: if it sounds too good to be true, it’s not true. Here’s that same advice, but in modern terms:

IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT’S A SCAM!

TEXTING’S DARK SIDE

Maybe you don’t text, but your daughter/granddaughter does, and she may be receiving abusive texts from a boyfriend/ex-boyfriend. One in four respondents to a national survey said that their partner texts them multiple times per day to find out where they are and who they are with. Learn the warning signs:

LINK

CHROME GETS A FOOT IN THE DOOR

Dell is putting Chrome on some of its computers in an attempt to be less PC dependent. Wonder if Microsoft is happy about that?

LINK

Thursday, July 01, 2010

BUTLER COUNTY (MO) ARCHIVES NEWS

In December 2009, MoSGA awarded a 21st Century Grant to the Butler County Archives in Poplar Bluff, Missouri. Following is the grant report submitted by the Butler County Archives in fulfillment of the grant program:

The grant, in the amount of $874.08, was awarded for the purchase of 144 Acid Free Shelf Pamphlet Files. They are to be used for storage of genealogical material donated to the archives for the benefit of other researchers.

The files and label holders were received 5 January 2010, and payment of $874.08 was made on January 25th. As time allows, volunteers are grouping together the subject matter and placing them in the shelf files. Footprints, published by Butler County Genealogical Society, Inc., has been organized and placed in the research room along with booklets and family histories of Butler County and the state of Missouri. The organization and display of family histories, genealogical magazines, research books and pamphlets will be an ongoing process.

This grant will help us preserve and make available material donated by other genealogists. We will now be able to offer both government and non-government records for researchers.

This concludes the project report for publication on the MoSGA blog and in the MoSGA newsletter.

Sincerely,

Joyce Drew
Consultant for Butler County Archives

Butler County at USGenWeb

MISSOURI HISTORICAL REVIEW ONLINE

The State Historical Society of Missouri is pleased to make past issues of the Missouri Historical Review –from 1906 through 2001—available online:

http://shs.umsystem.edu

This award-winning scholarly journal is published quarterly and has been the cornerstone of the Society’s publication division for over one hundred years. Richly illustrated and featuring contemporary scholarship on all facets of state and regional history, the journal also contains reviews of recently published books and offers notes and short pieces on local culture and Missouri life. Users will find within each issue a wealth of information on significant events and persons in Missouri history as authors have explored the political culture of antebellum days, Civil War battles and politics, religious and ethnic heritage in the state, and a wide variety of other topics.

Researchers can search the online Missouri Historical Review by keyword or browse through pages for more general findings. Volumes are added to the online database once they are ten years old. Researchers needing information or articles in issues dating from 2001 to the present should contact the Society at (573) 882-7083.

The State Historical Society of Missouri was established in 1898 and is located on the University of Missouri campus in Columbia. Its mission is to collect, preserve, make accessible, and publish the history of Missouri. The Missouri Historical Review is a benefit of membership in the Society.

The State Historical Society of Missouri
1020 Lowry Street
Columbia, MO 65201
Phone (573) 882-7083
Toll-free (800) 747-6366
Fax (573) 884-4950
shsofmo@umsystem.edu

NOTE: This page provides info on and access to their Digital Civil War Missouri Collection:

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GET CAPONE

Upcoming event at National Archives- Kansas City:

15 July 2010 – 6:30 p.m. Author event: Jonathan Eig, author of Get Capone.

Jonathan will be discussing his new book, which has already been featured on The Daily Show, CSPAN and NPR. Get Capone is an eye-opening biography revealing that Capone was the target of one of the most intense criminal investigations in American history - with orders coming directly from the White House. Get Capone also offers a bold new theory to explain the Valentine's Day Massacre, and sheds new light on Capone's connection to the crime.

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MISSOURI HISTORY MUSEUM NEWS

The following sources have recently been added to the Genealogy and Local History Index:

1. City Officials of New St. Louis: The World's Fair City (1903)

2. A Chronicle of Progress: General American Life Insurance Company (St. Louis, 1943)

3. Necrology scrapbooks, volumes 3-9 (death notices and obituaries mostly from 1911-1916)

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