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MoSGA Messenger, The Official Blog of the Missouri State Genealogical Association
Serving Missouri ancestor seekers since 7 November 2007

Tom Pearson, Editor

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Saturday, February 27, 2010

LOUISVILLE FAMILY HISTORY SEMINAR

The Louisville Genealogical Society's Family History Seminar and Book Fair will be held Saturday, 16 October 2010 at the Beargrass Christian Church, 4100 Shelbyville Road, Louisville KY 40207.

Megan Smolenyak Smolenyak will be the main speaker. There will also be several free classes, including an "Ask the Pro" panel, and Adoption Research. Commercial vendors, as well as area societies, libraries, and other organizations, will be represented in the vendor area.

For directions and further details: www.rootsweb.com/~kylgs

Submitted by
Betty R. Darnell

TRAITS OF A GENEALOGIST

Footnote Maven weighs in on what it takes to be a good genealogist- how many of the traits describe you?

LINK

FREEWARE BONANZA

There is certainly lots of freeware out there on the Web for you to download. You need to be careful, however-- some of it is very good, some not so good, while some are annoying or even downright dangerous. It's best to download freeware from sites you can trust, like the sources I list below. And remember, you should always SAVE a file you are downloading rather than INSTALL it-- then SCAN it with your Internet Security software before clicking INSTALL, regardless of its source.

Freeware at the Open Directory Project

Gizmo’s Freeware Reviews

CNet Downloads

Kim Komando Downloads

THE ORVILLE AND WILBUR WRIGHT PAPERS

Now available online courtesy of the Library of Congress:

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MALDEN HISTORICAL MUSEUM

It's located in Malden, Missouri, and has some very nice exhibits, including some Civil War surgical instruments:

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NOTE: From the Not Especially Relevant Fact Department: there is also a Malden, Illinois-- and some of my Owens kin are buried there!

FAMILY HISTORY SA

That's SA as in South Australia, for all you blokes and sheilas with kin from the land down under:

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ONE-STEP PAGES

We've mentioned Stephen P. Morse's One-Step Webpages before, but they're well worth a second mention:

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HISTORIC JAMAICA

Online book available at the Internet Archive:

Cundall, Frank. Historic Jamaica: with 52 illustrations (1915).

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FOLDER VANITY REMOVER

Odd name perhaps, but this freeware application serves a useful purpose: it seeks out and removes empty folders that are just taking up space on your computer:

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NOTE: As I've said before, always SAVE rather than INSTALL when downloading a file. Then SCAN that file with your computer security software before clicking INSTALL- better safe than sorry, no matter where that downloaded file came from!

DR. BILL TELLS ANCESTOR STORIES

Blog likely to be of much interest to genealogists:

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Note: Also note the link in left-hand navigation column for his book, 13 Ways to Tell Your Ancestor Stories.

GENEABLOGGERS

Long lists of genealogy blogs separated by locality or specialty:

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Note: Take a look at the listings for Missouri!

Friday, February 26, 2010

FEAR AND BLACK HAWK DOWN

A blog post about how a soldier-in-the-making's reactions to a favorite movie changed as he learned more and more about his new trade:

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SYNCHRONIZING YOUR COMPUTERS

Dick Eastman describes a fairly easy way to keep your genealogical data up to date on two or more computers:

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CEMETERY EXPLORERS

Interesting blog with lots of photos:

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BRANCHING OFF

Blog post about how even small local public libraries can be useful information sources for the genealogist:

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TENNESSEE CIVIL WAR SOURCEBOOK

Guide to Civil War related institutions and activities in the Volunteer State:

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Thursday, February 25, 2010

SHIPS PRESENT AT PEARL HARBOR

Long list of ships present when the Japanese arrived on December 7, 1941:

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THE CIVIL WAR DIET

What did Civil War soldiers eat, and did it provide adequate nutrition for their daily needs? This master's thesis attempts to answer those questions:

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IT IS USELESS TO CONCEAL THE TRUTH ANY LONGER

Thesis concerning desertions from Virginia regiments of the Confederate Army:

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HISTORY OF SCOTLAND

Now available full-text at the Online Books Page:

Title: History of Scotland.
Author: Brown, Peter Hume.
Publisher: Cambridge: University Press. 1899-1911, 3 vols.

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ANNE BOLEYN: A CHAPTER OF ENGLISH HISTORY

Two-volume book set available full-text on the Online Books Page:

Title: Anne Boleyn: A Chapter of English History.
Author: Friedmann, Paul.
Publisher: London: Macmillan & Co., 1884, 2 vols.

LINK

Wednesday, February 24, 2010

LEWIS AND CLARK HISTORICAL MARKERS

Interesting post about markers that commemorate the progress of the Lewis and Clark Expedition across the state of Missouri:

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VANISHING STL

Blog that bills itself as "Chronicles of the Vanishing Urban Landscape of St. Louis":

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FOUR YEARS IN THE CONFEDERATE ARMY

Online book available at the Internet Archive:
Dyer, John Will. Reminiscences; or, Four Years in the Confederate Army (1898).

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MISSOURI HIGHWAY MAPS

Digitized highway maps for 1918-2010:

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MISSOURI ADOPTION LAWS

Missouri is considering a change in access to adoption records:

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Saturday, February 20, 2010

LOVE LETTERS FROM PRAIRIE DU ROCHER

Posts from Geneablogie concerning the blogger's relatives from Randolph County, Illinois:

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ACCESS TO ARCHIVAL DATABASES-- WARS & INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

From your friends at the National Archives (US):

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ACCESS TO ARCHIVAL DATABASES-- PASSENGER LISTS

From your friends at the National Archives (US):

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CLOUDPAD

From their website:

A simple note storage application that allows you to quickly find, navigate and prioritize your notes. Notes are associated with tags that can be viewed and navigated via the common Cloud metaphor.

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IN MEMORY OF ROBERT E. LEE

Photo of and info about the marker that commemorates Lee’s work on the St. Louis Harbor (1837-1841):

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ANCESTRY.COM IS ON FACEBOOK

You can look at their page here:

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FEEDLY.COM

Organizes feeds from your feed reader (Google Reader, for instance) into a magazine-like interface. Check out the screenshots on their start page to see what I mean:

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NOTE: At this point, it's an add-on to the Firefox browser, so others will need to wait and hope it's adapted for other browsers.

USA FAMILY TREE

They offer free genealogy lessons for beginners via email. From their website:

Your lessons will be delivered by email, one lesson every few days, for roughly two months. You will also receive any future lessons that are added to the series at a later time.

We send out an email update from our companion blog each Sunday morning. This blog is where I write about current events in the genealogy world. We try to keep you up-to-date with this summary whereas the actual lesson are more timeless in nature. Above all, you can rest assured that your contact information is kept private. It will not be shared or sold with another company or mailing list.


LINK

Friday, February 19, 2010

LT. CALLEY’S APOLOGY

Lt. William Calley recently apologized for his actions on 16 March 1968 at My Lai hamlet. But does his apology have any real meaning at this point? A blogger (himself an Army officer who served in Vietnam) weighs in on that question:

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NOTE: Here’s an obit for CWO Hugh Thompson, Jr., the helicopter pilot who threatened to have his door gunner fire on Calley and his men if they didn’t stop the killing:

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2010 NGS CONFERENCE EARLY BIRD REGISTRATION ENDS MARCH 8TH

2010 NGS Family History Conference – Early Bird Registration Ends 8 March 2010

This year the annual NGS Family History Conference will be held in Salt Lake City, Utah, 28 April─1 May 2010. Whether your family helped settle the nation, migrated across the country, stayed in the same place, or recently arrived in America, this conference has much to offer. The family history resources in Salt Lake City, Utah, will provide a depth and breadth to your research.

The event features, 200 educational sessions taught by the nation’s leading lecturers, a vendor hall with over 150 exhibitors, Ask an Expert Consultations, International Workshops, Open Houses, and more.

The full conference event registration will include a ticket to “An Evening Celebration of Family History." The evening will include a multi-media tribute to family history, special guest speaker, and mini-concert by the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. Also featured during the week, will be free scanning of documents and photos by Ancestry.com.

REGISTRATION DETAILS AND THE CONFERENCE PROGRAM CAN BE FOUND HERE.

EARLY BIRD PRICING FOR THIS EVENT ENDS 8 MARCH 2010, SO REGISTER TODAY, AND AVOID THE LAST MINUTE RUSH TO RECEIVE OUR DISCOUNTED PRICING!

NEW GRANTS TO SHSM TO DIGITIZE ART IMAGES AND ORAL HISTORIES

Members of the State Historical Society of Missouri will be pleased to hear about two new grants that will greatly enhance access to collections. The grants are supported by the Institute of Museum and Library Services under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act as administered by the Missouri State Library, a division of the Office of the Secretary of State.

Nearly $40,000 was awarded for the digitization of art images, including paintings, drawings, lithographs, photographs, and editorial cartoons. Twenty-eight portraits and scenes painted by George Caleb Bingham, and over 300 paintings, drawings, and lithographs created by Thomas Hart Benton are covered by the project. Works were selected based on their historical value and continued popularity with researchers and the general public, and will include the well-known Bingham Civil War picture, Martial Law, or Order No. 11, and Missouri River scene, Watching the Cargo. Benton’s illustrations for The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Life on the Mississippi, which have not been widely seen since their initial use in the Limited Edition volumes of the 1930s and 1940s, are also part of the project.

Over 3,500 photographs from various collections covering a variety of Missouri topics, including railroads and depots, courthouses, political rallies, and additional subjects will also be made available. Included are the Otto and Joe Kroeger Collection, the Maximilian Schmidt Collection, and Charles Trefts Collection. The Kroeger collection is comprised of images centering on Jefferson City during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The Schmidt collection was created by Boonville jeweler Maximilian Schmidt who picked up photography as a hobby at the beginning of the 20th century and documented his everyday life and surroundings. Charles Trefts was a professional photographer whose works include coverage of the St. Louis area over much of the 20th century and a focus on the Ozarks region during the 1930s. All of these collections were donated to the Society by descendents of the photographers.

The Society’s Editorial Cartoon Collections include the majority of works, both press proofs and original drawings, created for the St. Louis Post Dispatch by Pulitzer Prize-winning artists Daniel F. Fitzpatrick, from 1917 to 1958, and Bill Mauldin during 1958 to 1963. The works graphically, and often poignantly, reflect attitudes and opinions of the artists and Missourians from the early days of the 20th century through World War I, the Great Depression, the Second World War, and subsequent mid-twentieth-century events that reflected America’s development as a world leader.

A second grant of $2,800 will convert recorded interviews with forty Missouri political leaders and activists to digital audio format. The audio portions and written transcripts will be made accessible online. This grant furthers the work of the “Politics in Missouri Oral History Digitization Project” which is a joint resource of the Society and the University of Missouri Western Historical Manuscript Collection.

For more information or to keep up with the progress on each of these grants, contact the Society at (573) 882-7083.

MISSOURI CIVIL WAR MUSEUM ADDS MAURATH AND STEVENS TO BOARD OF DIRECTORS

ST. LOUIS, February 9, 2010 – The Missouri Civil War Museum has added John Maurath, of Sunset Hills, and Gary Stevens, of Creve Coeur, to its board of directors.

The two new board members have been long-time supporters of the organization and also work on the museum’s staff. Maurath serves as the director of library services. Stevens is the director of marketing and public relations.

Maurath has more than 17 years of experience in sales, operations, management, and international business. He is a skilled family historian, researcher, and genealogist. Maurath is also proficient in the restoration of tombstones and monuments. He has been involved with the museum since 2003.

Stevens has worked in marketing communications, public relations, and management for more than 15 years. He has work experience in sports and entertainment, the military, healthcare, and not-for-profit organizations. Stevens has won several awards for public affairs work, including the Conspicuous Service Medal from the state of Missouri. He joined the museum in 2003.

“John and Gary have a long history with this organization and they are very familiar with its workings,” said Mark Trout, chairman of the Missouri Civil War Museum. “They bring diverse business experience as well as great dedication and enthusiasm to our project.”

The Missouri Civil War Museum is a not-for-profit educational institution located at Jefferson Barracks. The organization was formed in 2002 to save the historic Jefferson Barracks 1905 Post Exchange Building and convert it into what will become Missouri's largest and finest Civil War museum, library, and educational center.

The purpose of the Missouri Civil War Museum is to educate the public about the history of the American Civil War and its relevance to the state of Missouri. The museum is slated to open on April 12, 2011.

For more information about the Missouri Civil War Museum, please visit www.mcwm.org.

MARSHA HOFFMAN RISING

Marsha Hoffman Rising died peacefully in her bed on the seventeenth of February 2010 after a thirteen and a half year battle with ovarian cancer. She was born on the nineteenth of August, 1945 in Kansas City, Mo. to Paul and Zella (Deschner) Hoffman. She graduated from Winter Haven FL High school. She received her BA in Psychology from the University of South Florida and her MSW from Florida State University. She then taught for a year at Troy State University before being hired to become the first Director of the MSU undergraduate Social Work program. She guided that program though accreditation. In her early days in Springfield she was on the steering committee for the Child Advocacy Council and was the President of the local ACLU.

She then changed directions, left the University and became a Certified Genealogist. In that capacity she became the President of the Genealogical Speakers Guild, the President of the Federation of Genealogical Societies, a Fellow and President of the American Society of Genealogists, the Vice-President of the National Genealogical Society and a Trustee of both the New England Historic Genealogical Society and the Association of Professional Genealogists. She published several books, the most popular of which was The Family Tree Problem Solver. She also published several genealogical references, her magnum opus being Opening the Ozarks: The First Families in Southwest Missouri.

In the time she was given by the excellent surgery by Dr. Albert Bonebrake and experimental chemotherapy after her cancer diagnosis she chose to become a traveler. She visited 7 continents, 42 countries and all 50 states. She leaves to mourn her husband Dean; her sister , Carol; step-daughter, Amy and Amy's husband Brian Brown, all of whom want to thank St. John's Hospice for their care in the final days of Marsha's illness. Her body has been cremated and at her request there will be no service. There will be a visitation at Gorman-Scharpf Funeral Home Friday, February nineteenth, 7 to 9 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to: FGS, 1812 Fund-Rising Tribute, P.O. Box 200940 Austin, Texas 78720-0940.

Obituary (with photo) in the Springfield News-Leader.

Thursday, February 18, 2010

TAME YOUR PHOTOS- FOR FREE!

Having trouble organizing / editing your photos? Here are five free ways to make them behave:

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VIETNAM WAR COLLECTION

You can use the Footnote collection of Vietnam War photos, records, etc. free now through the end of February 2010:

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GETTYSBURG DAILY

This blogger provides a profusely illustrated daily post about some place / monument / marker on the Gettysburg battlefield:

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Here’s a link to his archives page.

PLAN YOUR VISIT TO GETTYSBURG

I’ve been there twice already, and wish I were going again this year:

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2010 CENSUS UPDATE

From: Claire Bettag
Date: Wed, 17 Feb 2010 21:56:17 -0500
Subject: Important message about 2010 census

You may know this already, but just in case...

This is an issue readers of this blog, I trust, will care about. Robert Ward, President of the Cape Cod Genealogical Society, has posted on the society's Web site an article regarding the 2010 Census. He says,

"The Census Bureau and the National Archives have agreed to throw out the 2010 census forms after archiving statistical data. This means that seventy-two years from now genealogists will see-- nothing."

Here is the link to Mr. Ward's article:

LINK

I received updated information from NARA at the end of the day today saying that the decision is not yet final.

So NOW is the time to contact the Archivist of the U.S., David Ferriero; the Director of the Census Bureau, Robert Groves; as well as members of Congress listed in the article.

Claire Bettag
1685 34th Street NW
Washington, DC 20007
202-625-2598

Wednesday, February 17, 2010

ONLINE MILITARY RECORDS AND INDEXES

Joe’s military records site is also changing URLs:

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Ditto for Online Searchable Death Records and Indexes: http://www.deathindexes.com/

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Ditto as well for Online Birth and Marriage Record Indexes for the USA:

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GERMAN ROOTS

Joe Beine’s German Roots website is changing URLs:

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HARRISONVILLE WWI MEMORIAL

Photo of with some information about this Harrisonville (MO) memorial:

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CIVIL WAR INTERACTIVE NEWSWIRE

Posts about Missouri Civil War news and attractions:

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LIBRARY OF CONGRESS PHOTOSTREAM ON FLICKR

Many photos of likely interest to genealogists:

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MISSOURI CIVIL WAR DIGITIZATION PROJECTS

The Kansas City Public Library is leading an effort to get thousands of Civil War-era letters, photos and military papers together in one place where anyone can see them anytime — the Internet.

The library has been awarded a $43,469 Missouri State Library grant to begin the digitization project and Web site, “The Missouri-Kansas Border: Where the Civil War Really Began.”

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After the planning phase, the library plans to request additional grants to complete the project.

Henry Fortunato, the library’s public affairs director, says that website will educate the local community, nation and the world on the critical role that the people and the communities of this region played before and during the Civil War.

The library already has scanned some documents, including a yellowed, hand-scripted letter from a soldier hospitalized in Lexington, Ky.:

I for one am tired of this awful war which has cost so many lives and no one but some supernatural power knows or can tell how many more is to suffer and die.

A similar project for the Springfield area has also been funded. That project, begun in mid-2007, has received four grants totaling more than $272,000, said Abe Rakov, deputy communications director for Secretary of State Robin Carnahan’s office.

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The Springfield and Kansas City projects are part of Secretary Carnahan’s Missouri Digital Heritage Initiative.

DIGITAL HISTORY

Digital History website is a cooperative project of a number of organizations. Its goal is to present an interactive, multimedia history of the United States from the Revolution to the present. I think they’re doing a great job, but take a look and see for yourself:

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Saturday, February 13, 2010

DIVIDED STATE: MISSOURI MILITARY ORGANIZATIONS IN THE CIVIL WAR

Divided State: Missouri Military Organizations in the Civil War was created to serve as an aid to genealogists and historians searching for information about particular Missouri Civil War regiments and regiment members. It is intended to serve as a supplement to such primary information sources as the records maintained by the Missouri State Archives in Jefferson City, and the National Archives in Washington, D.C..

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Divided State is a selective, annotated guide to information published in periodicals and books about various Missouri Civil War era military organizations (Union and Confederate). The sources cited can vary widely in scope and content. Some offer regimental histories; some accounts of particular battles; some lists or partial lists of regiment members; and some are lists of men from many regiments which contain the names of some men from the regiment in question. All cited sources will contain some information about the regiment under consideration.

Listings for periodical articles provide the following information: periodical title, volume number, issue date, page number(s), and a brief annotation.

Annotations provide an idea of the article's contents, and should thus alert the researcher to articles of potential relevance.

Listings for books and book sets provide the following information, when relevant: author, title, place of publication, publisher, date of publication, series number, volume number, page number(s), and a brief annotation. Annotations provide an idea of the book's contents, and should thus alert the researcher to books of potential relevance.

Sources in this bibliography are all available at the Central Library, St. Louis Public Library. Call numbers and owning departments can be ascertained by consulting their catalog, or by calling their History & Genealogy Department at 314-539-0385.

NOTE: Cited items are available at the Central Library, St. Louis Public Library. Call numbers and owning departments can be ascertained by consulting our catalog, or by calling our History & Genealogy Department at 314-539-0385.

You may also check Worldcat.org to see if cited items are available at a library near you.

THE BIOGRAPHICAL DIRECTORY OF RAILWAY OFFICIALS INDEX

The Biographical Directory of Railway Officials Index is a collective index for a set of books that contain biographical sketches of railroad officials. The time period involved is 1887-1985. Only those individuals who were born in, employed in, or resided in the St. Louis metropolitan area, or who had some official duties at the 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition (which was held in St. Louis) are included in the index.

LINK

These books are available at the Central Library, St. Louis Public Library. Call numbers and owning departments can be ascertained by consulting our catalog, or by calling our History & Genealogy Department at 314-539-0385.

You may also check Worldcat.org to see if these books are available at a library near you.

ANNALS OF METHODISM IN MISSOURI

Annals of Methodism in Missouri (published by the E. W. Stephens Publishing Company in 1893) was written by W. S. Woodard.

This link takes you to a significant mention index for Woodard's book.

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This book is available at the Central Library-- St. Louis Public Library. Call numbers and owning departments can be ascertained by consulting their catalog, or by calling the History & Genealogy Department at 314-539-0385.

You may also wish to check Worldcat.org to see if this book is available at a library near you.

ENOUGH WITH THE SNOW, ALREADY…

Think you’ve got a snow problem? Your ancestors didn’t have snowplows, snow blowers, and Ice Melt to make the snow removal job easier:

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GOOGLE DOCS

Randy Seaver is spreading the word about Google Docs-- and about backing up your precious genealogical research BEFORE disaster strikes:

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BOONE COUNTY ONLINE RESOURCES

If you’re researching Boone County kin, you’ll like this post on the Boone County Historical Society’s Online Archives:

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NAVY BEGINS PURGING OF PAPER ENLISTMENT RECORDS

I know that genealogists everywhere are cringing as they read this post title, but read the article in Stars and Stripes before making up your mind:

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BUSINESS AS USUAL AT ARLINGTON

It’s business as usual at Arlington National Cemetery, despite thigh-high snowdrifts-- err, more or less:

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Friday, February 12, 2010

ST. LOUIS PUBLIC LIBRARY RECEIVES $4 MILLION GIFT

As part of its Central Library renovation campaign:

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WHO DO YOU THINK YOU ARE?

Latest info on the genealogy-themed TV show that premieres after the Winter Olympics are over:

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Ancestry.com has put up a web page devoted to the new show. Here’s their press release:

I thought you might be interested in a Who Do You Think You Are? web page that Ancestry.com launched today: www.ancestry.com/spreadtheword. This web page includes simple ideas and tools that everyone can use to help get the word out about this new television show: downloadable flyers, an email to easily forward to friends, even wallpaper for your computer.

Excitement for Who Do You Think You Are? is already mounting. Here’s what people are saying about the show:

·“This is the opportunity of a lifetime for genealogical organizations to advertise themselves and build their membership. This will do for genealogy what Roots did for it in the late 1970s.” — Pat Oxley, President, The Federation of Genealogical Societies

·"Many people are interested in knowing more about their heritage, but have no idea how to begin. I hope Who Do You Think You Are? will encourage people to move from interest to action and take advantage of the many resources available.” —Janet A. Alpert, President, National Genealogical Society

·"Everyone has a story to tell—everyone has a history to discover! Now, Who Do You Think You Are? brings real family stories to life, enticing and encouraging all of us to do the same. " —Curt B Witcher, Senior Manager of Special Collections, Allen County Public Library

Who Do You Think You Are? is a golden opportunity to introduce your family and friends to family history and to show people how to successfully research their heritage. Ancestry.com partnered with NBC on this show for the same reasons - because Who Do You Think You Are? inspires people to begin searching for their own roots and presents new opportunities for the entire genealogy community.

Here are some quick ideas to let your friends and family know about the show – which premieres Friday, March 5 at 8/7c:

· Share the Who Do You Think You Are? trailer. Consider posting a link to one of the Who Do You Think You Are? trailers on your Facebook page, Twitter account, or personal website. Email the trailer to your friends, family and co-workers-– in fact the pass-along email mentioned above includes a video with the trailer and Lisa Kudrow talking about what prompted her to produce the series.

· Host a Who Do You Think You Are? premiere party on Friday, March 5th, 2010. Invite family, friends, members of your genealogy society, and anyone else to enjoy the show at your home or even the headquarters of your local genealogy society. Thomas MacEntee of GeneaBloggers provided some great tips on hosting a viewing party. You can view those tips here.

http://www.geneabloggers.com/plan-wdytya-viewing-party

So spread the word – and don’t for get to tune in to NBC on Fridays beginning March 5 at 8/7c.

Thanks!

Anastasia

LINK

THE GUINEA PIG CLUB

Badly burned RAF fighter pilots formed this club during WWII:

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FREE GENEALOGY SOFTWARE

CNet.com has a nice selection of free genealogy software that you can download:

LINK

Note: You should always select SAVE rather than INSTALL when downloading items from the Internet. Then check that item with your computer’s Internet security software before installing on your computer-- better safe than sorry!

ST. LOUIS AFRICAN-AMERICAN GENEALOGY CONFERENCE

1st annual conference, sponsored by the St. Louis African-American History & Genealogy Society:

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Date: Saturday, 20 February 2010
Place: Harris-Stowe State University, St. Louis (MO)

Thursday, February 11, 2010

WISE UP AND VOLUNTEER!

Blog post about how volunteering can make you a better genealogist:

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ALABAMA ONLINE ARCHIVES

Researching Alabama ancestors? This blog post includes numerous helpful links to online archives:

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Or maybe you are researching Arkansas ancestors:

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ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF THE MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN

Take a stroll through 150 years of MOBOT history (1859-2009):

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MISSOURI: HISTORY, GEOLOGY, CULTURE

Various digitized books (available full-text) on the above-named subjects:

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TENNESSEE CIVIL WAR SOURCEBOOK

Info about Civil War events in the Volunteer State:

LINK

Wednesday, February 10, 2010

STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY RETURNS TO 6-DAY WEEK

From their press release:

The State Historical Society of Missouri announced today (2 February 2010) that the Society’s Board of Trustees has voted unanimously to return the organization to its normal hours of operation, 8:00 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. Monday through Friday and 8:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Saturday. This new schedule is effective Friday, February 5, 2010. The Society has been closed on Fridays and Saturdays since November 1, due to a 25% reduction in its FY 2010 state appropriation that occurred in late October 2009.

The State Historical Society is able to return to a six-day week due to the more than $90,000 in private funds which has been raised to support its public purpose. This amount is enough to supplement the Society’s state appropriation for at least four months. In making this announcement, Executive Director Gary Kremer emphasized that the Society’s governing board understands that money raised thus far represents less than one-third the amount needed to restore the Society to the level of activity it was engaged in prior to the budget cut. The fund-raising effort will need to continue if the Society is to remain open six days a week.

Kremer further emphasized that the announcement that the Society will return to its normal hours of operation does not mean all Society programs have been restored. For example, there are still no funds for the Society’s popular Missouri History Speakers’ Bureau, and its newspaper microfilming project will be only partially funded. Likewise, there are no funds to restore the four full-time positions eliminated over the past year.

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PARISH RECORDS: BAPTISM, MARRIAGES, BURIALS, 1538-1900

From their press release:

Familyrelatives.com is pleased to announce the release of 5 million Parish records online. The database is a collection of historical parish and probate registers from many Counties of England and Wales dating from the early 1500s to the middle to late 19th Century. The records are available for viewing online and using new search technology, it allows leading genealogy website Familyrelatives.com to provide 5 million parish records which document baptisms, marriages and burials dating from 1538 to be searched more easily.

The Parish Registers are the Church’s official records of local baptisms, marriages and burials. The Registers date from Tudor times when a law of Henry VIII ordered all clergy to record this information in a register in church. Centralised Civil Registration was introduced in 1837 to provide one location covering all the parishes in the area, however the parish church registers provide the original source data to this day.

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NOTE: Familyrelatives.com is a subscription service, but you can browse some of their records for free.

VIETNAM WAR COLLECTION

You can use the Footnote collection of Vietnam War photos, records, etc. free now through February 2010:

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BYGONE ST. LOUIS

A blog of historical images of St. Louis, Missouri: from sketches to panoramas, and postcards to photographs:

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TOPEKA GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Date: Saturday, 24 April 2010
Place: Kansas State History Center, Topeka, KS
Speaker: Michael John Neill
Topic: Our Elusive Female Ancestors

More info here.

NEWS FROM TRI-COUNTY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY

Hello:

I hope that you are taking advantage of all of this bad weather to work on your family history research.

The January 2010 newsletter is now available online.

Our next meeting is Tuesday, Feb 16, and I hope to see you there.

Regards,

Nancy Thompson
Tri-County Genealogical Society
218 W. Walnut St.
Nevada, MO 64772

Tuesday, February 09, 2010

TREASURE TROVE DREAMS

When I was a boy, I sometimes daydreamed about finding a lost treasure. This guy never stopped dreaming:

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RUHLEBEN INTERNMENT CAMP ARCHIVE (1914-1918)

Finding aid for this Harvard University collection of materials produced by members of the Ruhleben Civilian Internment Camp. This camp’s occupants included 4,500 Allied civilians interned by the German government when WWI began:

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SERIAL KILLER ONCE REMOVED

Looks like we may not need a sample of a suspect’s DNA in order to match him to crime scene DNA—we can always match it to a sample from one of his close relatives:

LINK

GRANDMA DID USE A LOT OF NAIR…

Looks like chimps and ancestral humans split into two distinct species a lot more recently than was previously believed. Oh, and some of our early ancestors weren’t too finicky about species when it came to making a love connection:

LINK

Friday, February 05, 2010

MISSOURI CENSUS RECORDS

A guide to federal and state census records available for Missouri, courtesy of the Missouri State Archives:

LINK

EVOLUTION OF A MISSOURI ASYLUM: FULTON STATE HOSPITAL, 1851-2006

A video presentation on the first mental hospital west of the Mississippi:

LINK

ASSORTED VIEWS OF KANSAS CITY

599 images made available on the Web by the Missouri Valley Special Collections Department of the Kansas City Public Library:

LINK

ST. CHARLES COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY PHOTO GALLERY

They’ve got over 15,000 photos in their collection, and they are currently engaged in the process of cataloguing and digitizing them so that we can all enjoy them. View their work to this point here:

LINK

THE MISSOURI MORMON WAR

Mormon efforts to establish a “new Zion” in western Missouri weren’t appreciated by most “Old Settlers” (many of whom fairly obviously hadn’t been here very long themselves), and disagreements in time led to violence:

LINK

THE DECISION TO DROP THE ATOMIC BOMB

A digital collection courtesy of the Harry S. Truman Presidential Library:

LINK

ENCYCLOPEDIA OF CHICAGO

Chicago History Museum has made an online Encyclopedia of Chicago available on its website:

LINK

VIRTUAL CIVIL WAR CEMETERY

This industrious gentleman has been posting on Flickr numerous photos of tombstones in western Missouri and eastern Kansas cemeteries. He is especially interested in the tombstones of Civil War veterans:

LINK

Thursday, February 04, 2010

SELECTED INTERNET RESOURCES IN GENEALOGY

Nice list put together by staff at the New York Public Library:

LINK

HISTORIC BROOKLYN PHOTOGRAPHS

A finding aid to photos in the collection of Brooklyn Public library:

LINK

Note: You can view many photos online!

CRIME IN NEW YORK CITY, 1850-1950

A collection of photos, manuscripts, court transcripts, and other documents on this topic:

LINK

CIVIL WAR PHOTOGRAPHY

If you teach high schoolers (or if you would like to talk to your local genealogical society about Civil War photography), you may be interested in this CW Photography lesson plan:

LINK

LEARN OUT LOUD

Another source of free audio books and podcasts:

LINK

Wednesday, February 03, 2010

TO THE MEMORY OF SWEET INFANTS

How people reacted to the loss of a child in 18th century Virginia:

LINK

SCANDALOUS BEGINNINGS: WITCH TRIALS TO WITCH CITY

What happened in Salem, Massachusetts after the infamous witch trials of 1692:

LINK

Note: An introductory section does discuss the witch trials.

ENOUGH ABOUT WARGAMING, ALREADY…

Except that I love this guy’s blog name:

Starving Crazed Weasels Miniatures and Wargames Page

Don’t believe me? Take a look:

LINK

Note: Animal lovers, rest easy: no weasels were harmed during the creation of his blog

ROMAN SEAS

Did you know that there’s a website designed for folks interested in Roman naval wargaming? I didn’t, either:

LINK

40TH ANNUAL StLGS FAMILY HISTORY CONFERENCE

In case you haven't seen their announcement yet- very promising lineup of classes!

40TH ANNUAL StLGS FAMILY HISTORY CONFERENCE
Saturday, 15 May 2010
Maryland Heights Centre
2344 McKelvey Road

Again this year, we are pleased to be able to offer audio CDs will be made of selected lectures for those who were unable to attend. These CDs are available May 15th through September 1st 2010.

40A: Balancing on North Carolina
Understanding the geographical and migration patterns can improve your success with North Carolina research. Learn about locating records, repositories, and the resources you need to find a Tarheel ancestor. (J. Mark Lowe, CG, FUGAs)

40B: What’s New in RootsMagic 4, Part 1
An introduction to RootsMagic 4, the newest version of this award-winning genealogy software. Learn about new features like Web search, shared events (witnesses), person and place mapping, Evidence Explained-based SourceWizard, and much more. (Bruce Buzbee)

40C: Connecting with Your Czech and German-Bohemian Ancestors
This presentation is designed to help you identify an approach to locating your ancestors’ place of origin in today’s Czech Republic and tracing them in that country. (Dan Vornberg)

40D: Getting Started in Genealogy
If you are just getting started, you will want to know basic concepts of family history research, how to document your research, and the tools needed for best results. (Ann Barberis Wittenberg)

40E: Tennessee, the Road to the WestTennessee became a crossroads for travelers between the East and the frontier. Learn about the abundant records that exist for genealogists researching Tennessee. Strategies, repositories, and examples will be presented. (J. Mark Lowe, CG, FUGAs)

40F: Everything You Need to Know About Footnote.com
Learn about Footnote.com, an up-and-coming genealogical website, and the never-before-seen online historic documents they provide. (Russ Wilding)

40G: Irish Research—Climbing the Family Tree
Analyze information on your Irish family and develop a game plan to find ancestors across “the Pond.” (Sandra M. Brunsmann-Hughes)

40H: Published Histories, City Directories, and Sanborn Maps: A Trifecta of Sources
A wealth of information can be obtained in published histories, especially county histories. In addition, learn how to find and use city directories to locate the residences and businesses of families. Beginning in the 1800s and varying by location, Sanborn Insurance Maps may help you to locate buildings in historical settings. (Bob Goode)

40I: Siege Warfare: the Mo. State Archives Prepares for the Civil War Sesquicentennial (John Dougan)

40J: Why Send Germans to Missouri, Of All Places? Gottfried Duden and His (Many) Enemies (Steven W. Rowan)

40K: Using American Church Records in Genealogy
This lecture is designed for relative newcomers to explore what church records may exist in America and what useful information they may have for your family research. (Dan Vornberg)

40L: Kentucky, The First State to the West
The Commonwealth of Kentucky was the first state west of the mountains. Learn about the record types, where to find them, and how to use them in your research. (J. Mark Lowe, CG, FUGA)

40M: What’s New in RootsMagic 4, Part 2
Continue learning about the new features of RootsMagic. The To-Go feature makes it easy to run the program directly from a flash drive and much more. (Bruce Buzbee)

40N: How to Crack the Case on Your Family History—Missouri Laws and Judicial Records
Historic court records offer tremendous insight into the lives of Missourians and provide a valuable window into the past. Understanding the history of Missouri’s judicial records helps you to use and value them in family history research. (Patricia M. Luebbert)

40O: Finding My Way Home Again … OR A Closer Look at Migration Trails
Early settlers of North Carolina, Kentucky, and Tennessee followed pathways through the mountains that continue to be traveled today. This lecture focuses on the major trails and migration patterns that led our ancestors to the frontier South. (J. Mark Lowe, CG, FUGA)

40P: Footnote Presents: History is Biography—Making History Personal
Footnote.com helps you to find and share historic documents. See how this can help make history personal. (Eric Keith)

For more information, or to register, go here.

Tuesday, February 02, 2010

CHARGE! CIVIL WAR WARGAMING

The blog of a Civil War nut who likes to think small:

LINK
Note: Photos of his game terrain set-up look great!

FINDING GENEALOGICAL TREASURES IN UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES

Interesting article from the Family Tree Magazine blog:

LINK

NEW AT THE MISSOURI HISTORY MUSEUM

The following sources have recently been indexed and added to the
Missouri History Museum's Genealogy and Local History Index:


1. Valley Trust Magazine (1926-1930) (published monthly for the customers of the Mississippi Valley Trust Company of St. Louis).


2. Mound City Coupe, Livery and Messenger Co. Circular, [1896?].


3. Grace School of Dancing program for "The Woman in the Shoe," May 20, 1938.

4. History of St. Louis County, Missouri, volume II (by William L. Thomas; published in 1911).

5. Commercial and Architectural St. Louis (published in 1891).

In addition, the following finding aids have been added to the Archives Collection Guides page:

(look for the collection name alphabetically under the "Other finding aids and guides" heading):

1. Baldwin Family Papers

2. Bostick-Sprinkel Family Papers

3. Faust-Busch Family Papers

4. Flickinger Family Papers

5. Hoefle-Scholl Family Papers

6. Charles W. Logan Papers

7. Mary E. McKinney Papers

8. Oregon-California Collection

9. George Brown Randolph Papers

10. Ephraim Ellis Sparks Diary (Civil War diary)

11. Spoeri Family Papers

12. Walsh-Yore Family Papers

13. Wells Family Papers

To receive regular updates when new indexes and finding aids are posted to the Missouri History Museum website, sign up to receive our monthly Genealogy and House History News e-newsletter. To sign up, send an email to dpn@mohistory.org, with the word "subscribe" in the subject field and your name in the body of the email.

Or, for more frequent updates, follow the Missouri History Museum on Twitter @mohistorymuseum.

Sincerely,
Dennis Northcott
Associate Archivist for Reference
Missouri History Museum