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Saturday, January 30, 2010

StLGS GROUP ON GENEALOGYWISE

There’s a St. Louis Genealogical Society Group on Genealogywise.com- 32 members so far:

LINK

CALL HIM BRUCE

Did you know that Nigel Bruce (he played Dr. Watson in the Sherlock Holmes movies) was a descendant of Robert the Bruce?

LINK

Note: Nigel Bruce was wounded during WWI-- eleven bullets in his left leg:

LINK

EFFIGIES AND BRASSES

From their website:

“EffigiesAndBrasses.com is a collection of images of and links to medieval monumental iconography. Most of the monuments listed here are either effigies or brasses. The remainder are incised slabs, half-reliefs, and other miscellaneous representations. The current collection is focused on armoured European monuments, from the 12th to 15th centuries. The majority date from the 14th century.”

LINK

CACHED WEB PAGES

Not familiar with how to use cached web pages? This article explains how to use them:

LINK

Note: Why can a cached web page be important? Because sometimes it can bring a "dead" web page back to life, that's why...

DRED & HARRIET SCOTT: THEIR FAMILY STORY

Update received from the author:

A number of you asked about an order form for Dred & Harriet Scott: Their Family Story. It is now available here.

Feel free to forward or share this with anyone you think might be interested.

Thanks,
Ruth Ann

*******************************************
Ruth Ann (Abels) Hager, CG, CGL
Special Collections Department
St. Louis County Library

THE SECOND DAY AT GETTYSBURG

These guys think that Lee, who wanted to charge straight at the Union line, had it right, while Longstreet and Hood, who wanted to angle around the left flank of the Union line, had it all wrong. These gentlemen also feel that the accomplishments of Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain and the 20th Maine on the Second Day have been somewhat overrated:

LINK

Friday, January 29, 2010

NEW YORK STATE CEMETERY DIRECTORY

Just what it says-- with links to those cemeteries that have a web presence:

LINK

ST. LOUIS PALLADIUM

Online issues of this newspaper for St. Louis black Americans (1904):

LINK

NATIONAL CIVIL WAR CHAPLAINS MUSEUM

From their website:

“The mission of the National Civil War Chaplains Museum is to educate the public about the role of chaplains, priests, and rabbis, and religious organizations in the Civil War; to promote the continuing study of the many methods of dissemination of religious doctrine and moral teachings during the War; to preserve religious artifacts; and to present interpretive programs that show the influence of religion on the lives of political and military personnel.”

LINK

HEIDI ERASES YOUR TRACES

If you thought that erasing a file makes it go away forever, you are sadly mistaken. It’s still there on your hard drive until the day that your hard drive feels the need to overwrite that disk sector (but you've got no guarantee that day will ever come). Therefore, you should make sure that a hard drive you are selling / donating / recycling has been completely overwritten before saying goodbye. There are a number of ways to “zero out” a hard drive-- Heidi is a free alternative:

LINK

Thursday, January 28, 2010

RETRACING THE GROVE WESTWARD MIGRATION

Interesting blog-- John M. Grove’s attempt to follow in the footsteps of his ancestors, and to file ongoing posts about his progress:

LINK

DRED & HARRIETT SCOTT: THEIR FAMILY STORY

Received from the author:

I am pleased to announce that my book, Dred & Harriet Scott: Their Family Story, has arrived from the printer and copies are now available for sale. The book is being published by St. Louis County Library and will be sold at all of our library branches. The price of the book is $25.00 + $3 shipping & handling. Ordering information should be available on the Special Collections Department’s home page later this week at www.slcl.org/branches/hq/sc/. If the library also signs with a distributor, then the book could also be available through bookstores. I’m still waiting to hear about that.

Although I am starting to do radio and print media interviews, the initial author event/book signing will be held Friday, February 5th at 7:00 p.m. in St. Louis County Library Headquarters’ Main Reading Room. Lynne Jackson, great-great-granddaughter of Dred and Harriet and President of the Dred Scott Heritage Foundation will offer introductory remarks and then introduce me. I will talk briefly about the book that evening, show some key documents via PowerPoint, do a question and answer session, and then sign books. For more information, check the library’s website www.slcl.org/events/hager.htm, the library’s foundation blog http://slclfoundation.wordpress.com (scroll down to Feb. 5th), or call the library (314) 994-3300.

Please feel free to share forward this information to anyone who you think may be interested.

Ruth Ann Hager, CG, CGL

BEFORE THE ARCH

Jefferson National Expansion Memorial in St. Louis will be hosting an art exhibit by local artist Sheila Harris that consists of 40 watercolor paintings of buildings that stood on the Arch grounds prior to construction of the Arch:

LINK

ROOTSMAGIC ESSENTIALS

Dick Eastman’s column explains why you may wish to upgrade to this very useful free genealogy program or its more powerful (but not so free) big brother:

LINK

WORLD’S LARGEST BOOK

It’s the Klencke Atlas, and it measures a whopping 5 feet tall by 6 feet wide. It was presented to Charles II of England by Dutch merchants 350 years ago:

LINK

Wednesday, January 27, 2010

ASK GRANNY

"Ask Granny"© is a set of free computer files that we can send to genealogical societies with outreach programs. These specially created materials are used to help senior citizens capture their memories of family names, dates, and places so that no one in their family will ever have to say "Why didn't we ask Granny about this?"

The program is now one year old. We have presented the idea to the state meeting of the South Carolina Genealogical Society, and to many senior citizen groups in our community and around the state. The program has been featured in our local press:

http://www.onlineathens.com/stories/092009/liv_494985802.shtml

It has also been written up in the Atlanta "Journal/Constitution" and in "Reunions" magazine. It has been adopted in 12 states and in Australia, Canada, and the United Kingdom.

We would be glad to send our materials to genealogical societies for review, or to answer any questions about the program.

Thank you very much,

Judy Russell and Greg Crane
"Ask Granny"©
Free Genealogical Materials for Senior Citizens

www.askgranny.us
ask.granny.us@gmail.com

NOORVIK OF THE NORTH

You’ve already been counted for the 2010 Census-- if you live in Noorvik, Alaska, that is:

LINK

CTC AT WEST POINT

CTC is the Combating Terrorism Center at West Point. CTC has been publishing a monthly magazine since December 2007, and back issues are available full-text online:

LINK

APPLE TABLET

If you receive an unsolicited email about the new Apple Tablet device in the next few days, it’s probably best to ignore it. Chances are it’s news you really DON’T NEED. Go to Google News or another trusted news source to see the latest about Apple’s newest tech toy!

Tuesday, January 26, 2010

FGS ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2011

Why start thinking about it now? Because it’s going to be held in Springfield, Illinois, is why—- it will be relatively easy for genealogists in MO, IL, IN, and KY to attend:

Start saving now-- the Federation of Genealogical Societies will hold their annual conference 2011 in Springfield, Illinois (September 7, 8, 9 & 10, 2011).

Springfield is home to the Illinois State Archives, the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library, the Illinois State Library, the Illinois State Museum, the Illinois State Military Museum, the Lincoln Library (Springfield’s public library), University of Illinois-Springfield, and the Sangamon County Courthouse. If you are researching Illinois ancestors, this will be a not-to-be-missed opportunity for you:

LINK

Their conference this year is in Knoxville, TN (18-21 August 2010):

LINK

MISSOURI HISTORIC NEWSPAPERS

A very nice (and steadily growing) collection of online newspapers from Columbia, Hannibal, Kansas City, Liberty, Rolla, and St. Louis:

LINK

FREE CLASSES AT FAMILYSEARCH.ORG

Yes, they’re offering some interesting free online classes:

· England Beginning Research
· Germany Research New!
· Ireland Research New!
· Italy Research
· Principios básicos para la investigación genealógica en Hispanoamérica (México)
· Research Principles and Tools New!
· Russia Research
· U.S. Research New!

LINK

U.S. GOVERNMENT SUBSCRIPTIONS CATALOG

Your federal government publishes A LOT of magazines:

“This online catalog lists Government periodicals and subscription services offered for sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO). These materials represent a wealth of timely information from many areas of interest, published by a wide variety of Federal agencies in print, microfiche, and electronic formats.

The Superintendent of Documents offers three types of subscriptions:

Dated periodicals are issued on a regular basis, such as daily, weekly, monthly, or quarterly. These subscriptions begin with the next issue after your order has been processed.

Irregular subscriptions have no fixed date of issuance. These subscriptions begin with the next issue after your order has been processed.

Basic manuals with supplements begin with the issuance of the basic material and continue with subsequent supplements.”

LINK

U.S. GRANT PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY AT JEFFERSON BARRACKS?

Nothing definite yet, but it’s part of a proposal to turn Jefferson Barracks into a national tourist attraction:

LINK

Saturday, January 23, 2010

GENEALOGY AND LOCAL HISTORY INDEX

The Missouri History Museum’s Genealogy & Local History Index currently indexes more than 125 different sources. You can check out these sources by category here:

LINK

ANOTHER MILESTONE!

Well, folks, you've done it again! This blog now has had 75,000 visitors! Not bad for a toddler (MoSGA Messenger first drew breath on 4 November 2007).

Many thanks for your continuing support of MoSGA Messenger!

WHO DO YOU THINK YOU ARE?

The new NBC series with a genealogy theme premieres on March 5, 2010, after the Winter Olympics have concluded:

LINK

WHEN IN SPRINGFIELD

Nice list of Springfield, Missouri area libraries and museums with genealogical & historical collections:

LINK

ONLINE NEWSPAPERS

Free access to online newspapers for Adair, Boone, Buchanan, Jackson, and Jasper counties:

LINK

DUMP IE NOW

Are you sure you want to continue relying on Internet Explorer? The Chinese have found a way to take advantage of an IE design flaw to read dissidents’ emails. Several foreign governments are advising their citizens to switch from IE to a more secure browser. This article tells you how easy it would be to switch to Firefox:

LINK

STATEWIDE ILLINOIS LIBRARY CATALOG

I'm making special mention of the Illinois statewide catalog because I grew up and got my master's degree there!

The Statewide Illinois Library Catalog, known as SILC, is Illinois' first all inclusive statewide union catalog that integrates WorldCat and the Illinois Library Systems' local consortial OPACs, to provide both shelf status and interlibrary loan capabilities in a single searchable interface:

LINK

STATEWIDE LIBRARY CATALOGS

Links to the statewide library catalog for various states:

ALASKA
Statewide Library Electronic Doorway

ARIZONA
Arizona Statewide Library Catalog

CALIFORNIA
CalCat

CONNECTICUT
IConn.org- Connecticut’s Re-Search Engine

Note: There is a Guest login section for non-residents.

DELAWARE
Delaware Library Catalog

FLORIDA
Your Electronic Library on the Web

ILLINOIS
Statewide Illinois Library Catalog

IOWA
The Locator

LOUISIANA
State Library of Louisiana

MAINE
MaineCat

MASSACHUSETTS
Statewide Virtual Catalog

MICHIGAN
MeL

MINNESOTA
MnLink

MISSOURI
Arthur Library Catalog

NEW YORK STATE
The Research Library

NORTH CAROLINA
WebVoyager

NORTH DAKOTA
ODIN

OKLAHOMA
Oklahoma Digital Prairie

PENNSYLVANIA
Access Pennsylvania

SOUTH DAKOTA
SDLN

TEXAS
Library Catalog of Texas State Agencies

WASHINGTON STATE
Wayfinder

WYOMING
WYLDCat

THEY'RE COMING TO AMERICA

They're Coming to America--Immigration Records

On March 13 and 14, John Philip Colletta will be joining local teachers to present information about immigration records for colonial times through the 19th century. Currently living in Washington, DC, John Colletta has been studying the immigration and emigration patterns of our ancestors for a number of years. Contact Midwest Genealogy Center (816) 252-7228 to register for this conference. Before January 31st the price is $55. After the 31st, $65. Payment can be made by cash, check, or charge (Charge can be taken over the phone.) Optional Saturday lunch is $8, with a choice of beef, chicken salad, or vegetarian.

Angela McComas
Reference Assistant, Programming
Midwest Genealogy Center
Mid-Continent Public Library
3440 S Lee's Summit Road
Independence, MO 64055

Phone (816) 252-7228
Fax: (816) 254-7146

Friday, January 22, 2010

MILITARY ASPECTS OF THE SPANISH CIVIL WAR

Interested in this lesser-known 20th century military conflict (1936-1939)? Then’ll you’ll want to take a look at this blog on just that topic:

LINK

Note: Here's the Wikipedia article on the Spanish Civil War!

BRITISH BATTLES

Interested in a British battle of the 18th or 19th centuries? Then you’ll probably love BritishBattles.com:

LINK

PREVENTING PTSD

Looks like one way to prevent post-traumatic stress disorder is to give injured troops morphine ASAP:

LINK

WALL STREET AND MAIN STREET

The State Historical Society of Missouri and Western Historical Manuscript Collection will hold the second annual Day at the Capitol in Jefferson City, January 26, 2010, from 8:30 a.m. to 12:00 noon on the third floor of the Capitol Rotunda. The artistry and social commentary of Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist Daniel Fitzpatrick will be on display in “Wall Street and Main Street: the Economic Crisis of the 1930s." The exhibit demonstrates Fitzpatrick’s talents and the continued relevance of his work, after seventy-five years, in documenting the political, economic, and social milestones of the depression era. His drawings comment on the policies of Herbert Hoover, the election of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, the New Deal, and additional issues from the period. Viewers can draw many parallels with the current economic crisis as they ponder the bold drawings, poignant images, and wry wit of “Fitz.” The exhibit also includes photos, diary entries, newspaper articles and letters to reveal how Missourians weathered this difficult period in history.

Visitors will also see original copies of the Canton, Missouri, newspaper, Canton Press (July 21, 1864-July 13, 1865), which include issues dealing with the assassination of President Lincoln.

State Historical Society staff will be available to discuss the exhibit and explain the Society’s work promoting greater understanding and appreciation of our cultural heritage. Preserved documents and artworks are not just for scholars and historians; they are resources to be used and enjoyed by schoolchildren, genealogists, private citizens, and public servants—all those with an interest in our shared past.

About The State Historical Society of Missouri:

Founded in 1898 by the Missouri Press Association and a trustee of the state since 1899, the Society is the preeminent research facility for the study of the Show Me State’s heritage and a leader in programming designed to share that heritage with the public. The Society not only brings Missouri history to the state’s citizens, but also gives Missourians the tools to uncover the history in their own lives.

NOTE: Please note their $75 Challenge. Their budget has been drastically cut, and they need your help!

R.I.P. ART CLOKEY

Who was Art Clokey, you ask? Well, if you’ve ever heard of Gumby and Pokey, or Davey and Goliath, you already know a lot about him:

LINK

R.I.P GEORGE MICHAEL

Who was George Michael, you ask? Why, he was a well-known sportscaster who was born right here in St. Louis:

LINK

Thursday, January 21, 2010

STORIES AND FOLKLORE OF WEST CORNWALL by WILLIAM BOTTRELL (1880)

Free online book at the Online Books Page website:

LINK

THE ENGLISH CONVICT: A STATISTICAL STUDY (1913) by CHARLES BUCKMAN GORING

If any of your English ancestors were light-fingered (or just unlucky), this free online book may prove of interest:

LINK

NON-FEDERAL CENSUSES OF FLORIDA, 1784-1945

Karen Packard Rhodes, genealogical speaker and writer from Middleburg, Florida, is pleased to announce the publication of her latest book:

Non-Federal Censuses of Florida, 1784-1945: a Guide to Sources, by McFarland & Company.

The paperback book covers the colonial, territorial, and state censuses of Florida and documents which constitute supplements or substitutes for them. Finding aids and original and derivative sources for these censuses are covered, with critical evaluations and indications of where these books may be found in many Florida libraries. There is also information about such repositories as the Florida State Archives, the National Archives and Records Administration, and the General Archive of the Indies in Seville, Spain. The book may be ordered via amazon.com or directly from the publisher. www.mcfarlandpub.com.

Submitted by
Carla Mellott
SGES Librarian

Note: What is SGES, you ask? Why, it's the Southern Genealogist's Exchange Society, of course...

ENGULF AND DEVOUR HAS A FULL PLATTER IN 2010…

What Ancestry.com is planning to add to its already lengthy list of databases during 2010:

LINK

1940 & 1950 CENSUS SUBSTITUTES

Ancestry.com now includes the above-named databases. They give you a shot at finding limited information about persons in census years that have not yet been released to the public. Database entries consist mostly of city directory listings. What this means is that your odds of finding an ancestor you seek in one of these databases are greatly improved if that ancestor was an adult wage-earner who lived in a medium-sized to large-sized city:

LINK

Note No. 1: Successful searches return an image of the city directory page on which your ancestor’s name appears.

Note No. 2: Ancestry.com also provides a database that it calls the 1890 Census Substitute. This database is useful because most of the 1890 federal census was destroyed in a 1921 fire. This database also consists largely of city directory listings, but does provides access to voter lists for some localities.

FREE TAX ASSISTANCE

Yes, my friends, it's that saddest time of year once more-- time to appease the Feds. Here’s an easy way to find out if you qualify for free tax assistance, and where to find a free tax preparation center if you do:

LINK

Note: Website is called MoTax: Missouri Taxpayer Education, but you can search for free tax preparation sites in every state.

DOES YOUR COMPUTER HAVE THE SLOWS?

If your computer just doesn’t seem to run as quickly as it used to, you may need to clear out the unnecessary junk files that accumulate in any computer over time as a matter of course. A free and easy way to clean your electronic house is to download CCleaner:

LINK

Note No. 1: When downloading any file from the Internet, you should choose “Save” rather than “Install” that file. Then scan that file with your anti-virus software (you are running anti-virus software, aren’t you?) before installing on your computer.

Note No. 2: A reader has asked if there’s a quick way to scan a downloaded file. The answer is yes. Place the cursor on that downloaded file, then right-click your mouse. One of the choices you see should be “Scan”. Select “Scan,” and wait for the all-clear from your anti-virus software!

Tuesday, January 19, 2010

VICTORIAN SPIRITS IN THE CEMETERY

Interesting blog post about Victorian era funeral and burial customs:

LINK

Note: many of her 2009 blog posts feature cemetery photos from western Missouri / eastern Kansas cemeteries, including this one about Mt. Moriah Cemetery in Kansas City, Missouri:

LINK

THE ONLY GOOD SNAKE IS A LIVE SNAKE

You may not agree, but don’t try telling it to doctoral student Rod Wittenberg, who discusses common snakes of the Ozarks in this podcast:

LINK

CAVING IN THE OZARKS

Terry Mitchell discusses cave exploration in the Arkansas Ozarks in this podcast:

LINK

THE CCC AT DEVIL’S DEN

Assistant Superintendent Tim Scott discusses construction projects accomplished by the Civilian Conservation Corps at this Arkansas state park during the 1930s in this podcast:

LINK

ARTIFICIAL LIMBS FURNISHED TO CIVIL WAR SOLDIERS

From Genealogy Gems: News from the Fort Wayne Library
No. 70, December 31, 2009

by Dawn Slater-Putt

Many patrons visit the Genealogy Center with a list of specific books to consult. Such preparation before a research trip is to be lauded, but don’t overlook the benefits of casually browsing the stacks for that unexpected or interesting find! For example, “Artificial Limbs Furnished to Soldiers” (973.74 Aa1uw) is a photocopy of an 1866 Surgeon General’s Office report listing Union Civil War soldiers who received prosthetics. Arranged alphabetically, it includes each soldier’s rank, company, regiment, state, residence, date, type of limb received, its cost, and the manufacturer.

It might interest his descendants to know that Private W. B. Kress of Fort Wayne, Indiana, a member of Co. H, 75th Indiana Infantry, received an artificial arm on 11 February 1865. Kress’s prosthetic arm cost $50 and was made by the Marvin Lincoln company of Boston, Massachusetts.

By 11 May 1866, when the Surgeon General’s report was filed, the federal government had furnished its Union veterans with 2,134 prosthetic arms, 3,784 legs, 14 hands, 9 feet and 104 “apparatus” at a total cost of $357,728.

Providing prosthetics for Confederate veterans was not a function of the federal government, but of the individual former Confederate states. Some state-specific lists of Confederate soldiers who applied for artificial limbs exist, such as “Artificial Limbs for Confederate Soldiers” by Patrick J. McCawley of the South Carolina Department of Archives and History (973.74 So8mc). McCawley’s book describes the South Carolina General Assembly’s actions to furnish Confederate veterans with prosthetics from 1866 through 1909, followed by an alphabetical index to veterans’ applications for limbs that includes veteran’s name, county, year of record series, folder and item number.

Ansley Herring Wegner’s “Phantom Pain: North Carolina’s Artificial-Limbs Program for Confederate Veterans” (973.74 N81weg) is a combination history and index to records at the North Carolina State Archives. The index portion of the book lists the soldier’s name, county, unit, date, type of limb, and record citation.

Digitized images of Virginia Confederate soldiers’ applications for artificial limbs are in the Confederate Disability Applications and Receipts database on the Library of Virginia’s website. Genealogists may search the database most efficiently by cutting and pasting

http://ajax.lva.lib.va.us/F/?func=file&file_name=find-b-clas11

into their computer browser, and combining the search term “artificial” with the soldier’s surname in the top search box. Most applications include the veteran’s place of residence and affidavits describing where and how he was wounded. Rejected as well as approved applications are included among the images.

Researchers may be able to find similar record indexes or digitized images for other Confederate veterans by using keyword searching in the online catalogs of individual state libraries and state archives, or via Internet search engines.

Publishing Note:

This electronic newsletter is published by the Allen County Public Library's Genealogy Center, and is intended to enlighten readers about genealogical research methods as well as inform them about the vast resources of the Allen County Public Library. We welcome the wide distribution of this newsletter and encourage readers to forward it to their friends and societies.

To subscribe to “Genealogy Gems,” simply use your browser to go to the website:

www.GenealogyCenter.Info.

Scroll down toward the bottom of the first screen where it says, "Enter Your Email Address to Subscribe to "Genealogy Gems." Enter your email address in the yellow box and click on "Subscribe." You will be notified with a confirmation email.

Steve Myers & Curt Witcher, co-editors

EARLYWORD

Want to keep track of upcoming books and movies? Go no further:

LINK

ST. CLAIR COUNTY (IL) GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY NEWS

Please join us on Thursday, February 4, 2010, when scrapbookers Johnnie Baxter Weber and Terry Stillman will demonstrate techniques to preserve photos and documents, plus some of the latest tools to preserve your family history.

Thursday, March 4, 2010-- Tom Pearson will present "On Beyond Google: Effective Use of Search Engines by the Genealogist." Tom will illustrate how to use search engines, meta-search engines, specialty search engines; search statements; searchable concepts; keywords; Boolean operators; and queries-- all with an eye towards helping genealogists perform better and smarter searches!

Thursday, April 1, 2010-- TBA.

Thursday, May 6, 2010-- Dana Prusacki will tell us about What's New at the Belleville Public Library.

Our monthly meetings begin at 7:30 pm at the St. Luke's Parish Hall, 226 N. Church St., Belleville, Illinois 62220.

We are always looking for good speakers on genealogical topics. Let us know if you can recommend any speaker(s) from the St. Louis Metro Area, or if you can speak on a topic of interest to our Society.

For more information, program suggestions or inclement weather, please contact Karen LaCroix, Program Chairperson by e-mail or call (618) 286-4392.

Visitors and Guests are Always Welcome!

Sincerely,
Diane Auth
Membership Chairperson
St Clair County Genealogical Society

Thursday, January 14, 2010

HOW YOU CAN HELP HAITIAN EARTHQUAKE VICTIMS

Provides list of options available to persons who want to help:

LINK

CHIMBORAZO

Review of a new book about the Confederacy’s largest hospital:

LINK

Note: For a time, it was the largest military hospital in the world...

POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER, 1860s STYLE

Did Civil War vets suffer from PTSD? New book argues that many did (although few discussed it with their families):

LINK

PHANTOM LIMBS, PHANTOM PAINS

Seems many Civil War amputees continued to feel pain in the amputated limb long after the amputation had occurred. A new book covers that topic and other topics of interest in Civil War medicine:

LINK

DRED AND HARRIET SCOTT: THEIR FAMILY STORY

Event Type: Author Events
Date: Friday, February 05, 2010
Start Time: 7:00 PM
Place: St. Louis County Library Headquarters, 1640 S. Lindbergh, St. Louis, MO 63131

Description: Ruth Ann (Abels) Hager, St. Louis County Library reference specialist and genealogist, will discuss her new book "Dred and Harriet Scott: Their Family Story." Since her discovery of new information about Harriet Scott in 2006, Hager has researched the family's story with the support and endorsement of descendants and the Dred Scott Heritage Foundation. Her groundbreaking research opens up a new chapter of St. Louis history. Lynn Jackson, great-great-grand-daughter of Dred and Harriet and President of the Dred Scott Heritage Foundation, will offer introductory remarks.

LINK

CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL DISASTER INFORMATION

I didn’t know it existed, either:

LINK

U.S. AID TO HAITIAN EARTHQUAKE VICTIMS

How the U.S. military is responding:

LINK

UNDERSTANDING ENCRYPTION

Cyber Security Tip ST04-019

Encrypting data is a good way to protect sensitive information. It ensures that the data can only be read by the person who is authorized to have access to it.

What is encryption?

In very basic terms, encryption is a way to send a message in code. The only person who can decode the message is the person with the correct key; to anyone else, the message looks like a random series of letters, numbers, and characters.

Encryption is especially important if you are trying to send sensitive information that other people should not be able to access. Because email messages are sent over the internet and might be intercepted by an attacker, it is important to add an additional layer of security to sensitive information.

How is it different from digital signatures?

Like digital signatures, public-key encryption utilizes software such as PGP, converts information with mathematical algorithms, and relies on public and private keys, but there are differences:

* The purpose of encryption is confidentiality-- concealing the content of the message by translating it into a code. The purpose of digital signatures is integrity and authenticity-- verifying the sender of a message and indicating that the content has not been changed. Although encryption and digital signatures can be used independently, you can also sign an encrypted message.

* When you sign a message, you use your private key, and anybody who has your public key can verify that the signature is valid (see Understanding Digital Signatures for more information). When you encrypt a message, you use the public key for the person you're sending it to, and his or her private key is used to decrypt the message. Because people should keep their private keys confidential and should protect them with passwords, the intended recipient should be the only one who is able to view the information.

How does encryption work?

1. Obtain the public key for the person you want to be able to read the information. If you get the key from a public key ring, contact the person directly to confirm that the series of letters and numbers associated with the key is the correct fingerprint.

2. Encrypt the email message using their public key. Most email clients have a feature to easily perform this task.

3. When the person receives the message, he or she will be able to decrypt it.

Authors Mindi McDowell

Produced 2004 by US-CERT, a government organization.

Note: This tip was previously published and is being re-distributed to increase awareness.

Terms of use: http://www.us-cert.gov/legal.html

This document can also be found here.

Wednesday, January 13, 2010

LEBANON EVENTS CALENDAR

Events calendar for Lebanon, Missouri for January-June 2010:

LINK

COMPILED MILITARY SERVICE RECORDS, WINNEBAGO INDIAN DISTURBANCES OF 1827

From Genealogy Gems: News from the Fort Wayne Library
No. 70, December 31, 2009

by Cynthia Theusch

After four Winnebago braves attacked a farmhouse in June 1827 near Prairie du Chien in what is now Wisconsin, volunteers from Illinois and Michigan were called up to help federal troops quell the ensuing “disturbances.” Only a few skirmishes took place and most of the 1,000 volunteers had served less than two months before the Winnebago surrendered in September. Available at the Genealogy Center, “Compiled Military Service Records of Michigan and Illinois Volunteers Who Served During Winnebago Indian Disturbances of 1827” is a three-roll National Archives microfilm set pertaining to these troops.

Records are arranged by company and then in alphabetical order by the name of the soldier. Volunteers from Illinois may have served in the Mounted Riflemen or in companies commanded by Captains Field, Hamilton, Nair, Strode or Whiteside. Michigan volunteers served in companies under Captains Dickinson, Johnston, Smith and McNair. Captain Smith’s company consisted of volunteers from the Menominee tribe who were assigned the rank of “Warrior.” In front of each company’s records is a record-of-events jacket that highlights the stations, movements and activities of the unit. One such jacket provides this description: “Muster Roll of a Company of mounted Riflemen Commanded by Capt. Achillis Morgan who at the special request of Alexander Wolcott, Jr., Esqr., Indian Agent at Chicago, Volunteered their services for the defence of Fort Dearborn on the 28th day of July 1827 and were discharged on the 16th day of August 1827.”

Each soldier’s record consists of muster roll abstracts in a jacket-envelope noting the volunteer’s name, unit and incoming and outgoing rank. Because of the short period of service, most jackets contain only one card abstract of a muster roll entry relating to the soldier. Each abstract shows the soldier’s name, unit, period of service, whether present or absent on particular days, name of the person who completed the muster roll jacket, and remarks such as “served with his own arms” or “served with public arms.” The records of Menominee warriors who served provide an English translation of their name, as with May-aw-ko-may, “The Straight Nose Warrior” and Pe-de-dah, “The one who comes making a noise.” The identification of parentage for some of the warriors is an added genealogical bonus, as with O-me-gw-on, “The Feather,” son of O-shaw-wo-nim.

These military records may help fill a gap in your ancestor’s life. For those with Menominee forebears, they may add another generation to the family tree in a time period that is difficult to research.

Publishing Note:

This electronic newsletter is published by the Allen County Public Library's Genealogy Center, and is intended to enlighten readers about genealogical research methods as well as inform them about the vast resources of the Allen County Public Library. We welcome the wide distribution of this newsletter and encourage readers to forward it to their friends and societies.

To subscribe to “Genealogy Gems,” simply use your browser to go to the website:

www.GenealogyCenter.Info.

Scroll down toward the bottom of the first screen where it says, "Enter Your Email Address to Subscribe to "Genealogy Gems." Enter your email address in the yellow box and click on "Subscribe." You will be notified with a confirmation email.

Steve Myers & Curt Witcher, co-editors

GENEALOGY WEBSITES YOU CAN USE

Randy Seaver of Genea-Musings put together this nice list (PDF format) of useful genealogical websites:

LINK

Note: It includes this blog, of course

HISTORY TO MYSTERY

O’Fallon, Illinois resident Andree Swanson will talk about how the local area features in her debut novel, “A Family to Die For”, at 1 p.m. at the main branch of the Belleville (IL) Library on January 23, 2010.

Her talk, “History to Mystery (or How a Quiet, Respectable Interest in Genealogy and History Turned into Murder in St. Clair County),” focuses on how she used the local area and a lifelong interest in genealogy and history to create a romantic suspense novel that uses St. Clair County as its backdrop. The main characters in her book have to solve a century-old identity theft before a murderer strikes again.

Swanson, who writes under the penname A.J. Brower, places her first novel in St. Clair County, at the imaginary Swansea High School and a Victorian mansion on the bluffs overlooking St. Louis. Mike Garretson, the high school’s baseball coach, has one month to prove an ancestor was an imposter to get his inheritance. With historian Jennie Foster’s help, he might do it— unless they end up as dead as his murdered grandmother.

The website “Long and Short Reviews” gave the novel five stars:

“If you love a great who-done-it mystery that involves a lot of family history that’s also a great romantic read with memorable characters told by a dynamic wordsmith, look no farther that this wonderful tale. I think Ms. Swanson has a definite hit on her hands.”

Published by the Wild Rose Press, *A Family to Die For*, was released in both print and digital formats in November. Copies of the book will be available following the presentation.

For additional information and to register for this event, contact Dana L. Prusacki, Archivist, Belleville Public Library, at 618-234-0441 or via email.

THE LAND OF FLOWERS

This 400-year old map puts China at the center of the world, and calls Florida “The Land of Flowers”:

LINK

Tuesday, January 12, 2010

18 AWESOME TECH ITEMS WE DIDN’T HAVE TEN YEARS AGO

Interesting blog post, with additional didn’t haves provided in the comments section:

LINK

WESTERNERS IN GRAY

A review of this book history of the 5th Missouri Infantry Regiment (CSA). The reviewer liked the book a lot, but has several suggestions for the author:

LINK

SOFTWARE PRICED TO SELL…

OK, it’s actually a list of ten great FREE programs:

LINK

NGS AWARDS AND COMPETITIONS

DEADLINE for entries is 31 January 2010

NGS Rubincam Youth Award

This award recognizes youth in two categories based on age and grade level.

Senior - Students in grades 10 to 12, or between the ages of 16 to 18 years.

Junior - Students in grades 7 to 9, or between the ages of 13 to 15 years.

NGS Membership is not required. Students must submit an original unpublished work written in English and include email contact information. Complete details and submission forms are available here.

NGS Home Study Course Scholarship Award

The award is a scholarship for the NGS American Genealogy: A Home Study Course. It presented to an individual who demonstrates a serious interest in furthering their genealogical education, has attended national/regional or local conferences, and subscribes to genealogical publications. NGS Membership is required.

NOTE: Ineligible are those who have previously enrolled in the Home Study Course and those with genealogical accreditation or certification. Details and submission forms are available here.

NGS Genealogical Writing Competitions program recognizes excellence, scholarship, and achievements in the field of genealogy by presenting two awards to individuals and nonprofit organizations for significant contributions to the field of genealogy or for a specific, significant, single contribution in the form of an article or book, or other publication which serves to foster scholarship and/or otherwise advance or promote excellence in genealogy. Nominees need not be a member of NGS. The publication must have been published during the past three years. The two categories are:

1. Award for Excellence: Genealogical Methods and Sources is selected for a specific, significant single contribution in the form of a book, an article or a series of articles published during the last three years that discuss genealogical methods and sources and serves to foster scholarship and/or otherwise advances or promotes excellence in genealogy. All nominations must include e-mail contact information. Instructions and the nominating forms are available here.

2. Award for Excellence: Genealogy and Family History Book is presented to the person who has made a specific, significant single contribution in the form of a family genealogy or family history book published during the past three years which serves to foster scholarship and/or otherwise advances or promotes excellence in genealogy. All nominations must include e-mail contact information. Instructions and the nominating forms are available here.

NGS Filby Award for Genealogical Librarianship Sponsored by ProQuest

An outstanding librarian will be honored during the 2010 NGS Conference in Salt Lake City 28 April - 1 May. The Filby Award is $1000 sponsored by ProQuest and is awarded to a librarian who has made significant contributions in the field of genealogy. If you know a worthy librarian, please nominate them today. Criteria for judging and nominating forms are available here.

Award of Merit

NGS will present awards to individuals or institutions who, over a period of five years or more, have made outstanding contributions to NGS programs or who have performed outstanding work in the field of genealogy, history or biography. The nominee need not be a member of NGS. If you know someone worthy, nominate them today. Forms are available here.

Distinguished Service Award

NGS will present awards to individuals who have made outstanding contributions to NGS programs or who have performed outstanding work in the field of genealogy, history, biography, or heraldry. A nominee must have been an NGS member for at least one year when nominated. The submission form is online here.

National Genealogy Hall of Fame

NGS Hall of Fame honors individuals of the past who made significant contributions to genealogy and set high standards by which we work today. A nominee need not have been an NGS member. They must have been actively engaged in genealogy in the United States for at least ten years, must have been deceased for at least five years at the time of nomination, and must have made a contribution to the field of genealogy judged to be of lasting significance in ways that were unique, pioneering, or exemplary. Submission forms are available online here.

Fellow of the National Genealogical Society

The NGS Fellow Award recognizes outstanding work in the field of genealogy, or the related fields of history, biography or heraldry, in addition to outstanding service to NGS. The nominee must have been an NGS member for at least five years. The nominating form is online here.

Lynda Childers Suffridge
Awards Committee Chair

Monday, January 11, 2010

MASTERING WEB SEARCHING

If you want to get REALLY good at it (and don’t mind paying for your new-found expertise) the University of Toronto offers a seven-week, online course:

LINK

NOTE: If you have already taken this course at some point, you can also audit it to update your web searching skills.

A MODERN HISTORY OF NEW LONDON, CONNECTICUT

Full-text online version of A Modern History of New London, Connecticut (1922), 3 vols.:

LINK

BECOMING DIGITAL

In the last decade, most of us have become a lot more digital than we were before:

LINK

REPEATING RIFLES IN THE CIVIL WAR

Would widespread use of repeating rifles by Union soldiers (as opposed to the actual limited use made of them) have made a dramatic difference during the Civil War? I think this excerpt from the diary of a Virginia Confederate soldier who was present at Chickamauga makes it clear that it would have:

LINK

LIBRARY DE-MOUSER

If your library is host to the pitter-patter of little feet not belonging to children, what do you do? Why, you get a cat, of course! Then you find out that your cat is such a great mouser that she’s making the news:

LINK

Note: And what do you name a library cat? Why, Stacks, of course…

Saturday, January 09, 2010

MASKS AROUND THE WORLD

Maybe not strictly genealogical, but a most interesting collection nevertheless:

LINK

Note: You may also enjoy viewing Loom Beadwork of the Plains Indians:

LINK

Or Osage Ceremonial Garments:

LINK

ROBOT HUT

This guy REALLY likes robots-- there are thousands of them in his collection, and he even makes his own robots-- but you can only see his collection if your email to him convinces him that you love robots every bit as much as he does:

LINK

DOES MISSOURI NEED ITS OWN NESSIE?

If you think we need our own Loch Ness Monster, and you’ve got enough spare cash to meet the seller’s reserve price, you can buy a 60-foot-long sea serpent model on eBay:

LINK

NARAations

A blog about online public access to the records of the U.S. National Archives:

LINK

Note: In one post, KC Archives staffer Kimberlee Ried talks about a favorite Archives photo of the Wonderland Arcade:

LINK

THE DIGITAL CEMETERY

Addresses, maps, and GPS info for various western Missouri / eastern Kansas cemeteries:

LINK

JEFFERSON CITY PRISON REDEVELOPMENT PLANS

Big things are apparently in store for the former Missouri State Penitentiary:

LINK

BOOK BURNING 2010 STYLE

It seems that rising UK fuel costs have led many cash-strapped senior citizens to begin utilizing a new, inexpensive fuel source: used books. Seems that a good, thick hardback book like an encyclopedia or almanac will burn most of the night. Seniors are swarming charity shops like Goodwill and Salvation Army bookshops to find their “fuel” at the cheapest price possible:

LINK

Note: If this post has inspired you to start burning "book logs," please ask yourself these questions before consigning that book to the fire:

Would any person I know like this book as a gift?

Would any library I use appreciate this book as a donation to its collection?

If the answer to either question is yes, DON'T burn that book!

TOO MUCH INFORMATION?

How would you feel about having a photograph of your Civil War ancestor lying dead on a battlefield? Descendents of Colonel William Rogers of the 2nd Texas Infantry Regiment are in that position, as this CDV illustrates:

LINK

Note: The blog post in question is labeled "Gruesome Original CDV of Confederate Dead" for a reason, so you have been warned...

THE BLOEDNER MONUMENT

WASHINGTON (Dec. 30, 2009) - Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric K. Shinseki announced today the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has selected the Frazier International History Museum in Louisville, Ky., as the new home of the Bloedner Monument, the nation's oldest Civil War memorial.

The Bloedner Monument was removed from Cave Hill National Cemetery in Louisville in December 2008 and taken to a temporary facility where it was professionally conserved by Conservation Solutions Inc. to arrest further damage.

"The removal of an important monument from a national cemetery is rare and was not undertaken without great deliberation," said Secretary Shinseki. "However, the overwhelming significance of the Bloedner Monument and its failing condition warranted this unusual step."

The monument was carved in January 1862 by Pvt August Bloedner to commemorate his fellow soldiers of the 32nd Indiana Infantry, all of them German immigrants who fell in the Battle of Rowlett's Station near Munfordville, Ky. The monument's original location was on the battlefield, marking the graves of 13 soldiers who perished there. When most of these remains were removed to Cave Hill National Cemetery in 1867, the Bloedner Monument was moved there as well.

VA historians, in collaboration with the Kentucky Heritage Council and Heritage Preservation Inc., selected the Frazier International Museum as the new home from three interested facilities based on Civil War exhibit plans, controlled environment and security, financial stability, annual visitation and proximity to Cave Hill National Cemetery.

The monument was fabricated from St. Genevieve limestone, with a base of Bedford limestone added in 1867. It measures approximately 5 feet long, 1 foot deep and 3 feet high. The monument is carved on one side with a relief of an eagle and an inscription in German in a rustic script. The text was approximately 300 words and 2,500 characters long at the time it was carved. Because of the poor quality of the limestone and effects of the environment, the monument has lost a significant amount of material. Only about 50 percent of the original carving and inscription remains.

The monument was temporarily relocated to a University of Louisville facility for treatment while VA conducted a thorough evaluation of potential sites. The evaluation process included written proposals and site visits. VA posted information on the Internet, mailed information to Veterans and Civil War heritage groups and held a public information meeting to solicit suggestions.

A new monument, with an interpretive sign explaining the significance of the original Bloedner Monument and indicating its location, will be placed at Cave Hill National Cemetery in 2010.

LINK

ILLINOIS WOMEN ARTISTS PROJECT

If you’re researching a female artist from Illinois (active 1840-1940), you’ll want to start here:

LINK

Friday, January 08, 2010

UPCOMING EXHIBITS AT NARA-KC

Mapping Missouri: Maps from the Collection of the Missouri State Archives
February 9 - May 29, 2010

Mapping Missouri: Maps from the Collections of the Missouri State Archives features more than 100 examples of cartography from the Missouri State Archives' collection and is supplemented by maps from the National Archives at Kansas City. This exhibit includes historical maps from the 19th century that show how surveying and cartography were key to European American settlement of present-day Missouri. Drawing from diverse examples as the land survey maps made by Antoine Soulard from 1796-1806 and computer generated census maps made in the year 2000, this exhibit explores the history of cartographic images of Missouri and the role they play in our everyday world. This exhibition is appropriate for grades four and up.

Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race
March 16 - June 10, 2010

From 1933-1945, Nazi Germany enlisted the help of physicians, scientists, public health officials and academic experts to develop racial policies aimed at "cleansing" German society of individuals viewed as biological threats to the nation's "health". What begin with the mass sterilization of "genetically diseased" persons resulted in the near annihilation of European Jewry.

To relate this history and explore its contemporary implications, the National Archives at Kansas City in partnership with the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education and in cooperation with the Center for Practical Bioethics, will present the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum's traveling exhibition Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race. Featuring original artifacts, photographs, documents and historic film footage, the exhibit illustrates how Hitler's Nazi regime attempted to implement its vision of an ethnically homogeneous community through a program of racial eugenics that culminated in the Holocaust. This exhibition is appropriate for high school age and above.

All exhibit tours are free of charge. To schedule a guided tour of either exhibit please contact Lori Cox-Paul, Education Specialist, at 816-268-8017 or email her here.

JANUARY EVENTS AT NARA-KC

11 - 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. - U.S. Census Mobile Tour and 10:00 a.m. press conference onsite. Includes interactives for the public to view and information about the Census which will be taken during 2010. The gift shop and research rooms will be open today.

12 - 1:00 p.m.(CST) Know Your Records session via IDL - National Archives Online resources AAD and ARC with Lynn Goodsell - learn how to search online records on the National Archives' Access to Archival Databases (AAD) and Archival Resource Catalog (ARC). Lynn Goodsell and Rebecca Warlow will demonstrate how to use these online resources and the types of records available such as archived databases and computerized records as well as selected historical documents, photographs, and images.

13 - 10:00 a.m. Computers 101 using NARA records - Never touched a computer? Our staff will assist you in understanding basic computer skills while also teaching how to search U.S. Federal Census records found on the subscription based web site Ancestry.com. Following the class, volunteers and staff members will be available to help you with your genealogical research on the Internet. Reservations are required. Space is limited.

23 - Last day for viewing The Kansas-Nebraska Act and It's Big exhibits.

26 - 2:30 p.m.(CST) Know Your Records session via IDL, Famous Patent Records - join Ashley Bucciferro, archivist at the National Archives, discusses some of the more famous patent records held at the National Archives on the 130th anniversary of the 1880 patent for Thomas Edison's light bulb.

27 - 10:00 a.m. Computers 102 using NARA records - Looking to improve your computer skills? Join the National Archives staff as we cover basic Internet navigation and how-to-print by learning how to use immigration databases on Ancestry.com. Reservations are required. Space is limited.

LINK

CONTINGENCIES IN CIVIL WAR HISTORY

I firmly believe that there were any number of pivotal events during the Civil War. If any of these pivotal events had been resolved differently, the effect on the war (and / or the peace afterwards) would have been enormous. It only took me 20 minutes or so to come up with these potential deal-breakers:

1. TN, VA, or TX fail to secede (1861)
2. Secessionist forces seize St. Louis Arsenal prior to arrival of N. Lyon and U.S. regulars (1861)
3. R. E. Lee accepts field command of U.S. Forces (1861)
4. J. Johnston not wounded, so R. E. Lee does not take command (1862)
5. G. McClellan fully commits reserves to fight at Antietam (1862)
6. J. Davis overrules R. E. Lee and sends substantial reinforcements to J. Pemberton at Vicksburg (1863)
7. R. E. issues an unambiguous order to R. Ewell to attack Cemetery Hill on first day at Gettysburg (1863)
8. J. L. Chamberlain orders retreat rather than bayonet charge on second day at Gettysburg (1863)
9. G. Granger obeys orders and waits in reserve rather than reinforcing G. Thomas on Snodgrass Hill at Chickamauga (1863)
10. G. Thomas's Army of the Cumberland waits at foot of Missionary Ridge for orders to advance instead of advancing without authorization (1863)
11. J. Longstreet not wounded at Battle of the Wilderness (1864)
12. Confederate authorities accept P. Cleburne's proposal to arm slaves (1864)
13. W. T. Sherman captures Atlanta two weeks after presidential election; McClellan elected president (1864)
14. L. Powell kills W. Seward and / or G. Atzerodt kills A. Johnson and/ or General & Mrs. Grant attend theater with Lincolns (1865)
15. A. Johnson commutes death sentence of Mrs. Surratt (1865)

What pivotal events occur to you?

SNOW DAY!

St. Louis received a fair amount of snow Wednesday evening / Thursday morning, so my employer called a Snow Day. Hooray! This was the view out my front door Thursday morning:



Today we're back at it, though- and it's COLD out there!

Wednesday, January 06, 2010

ISGS SPRING TOURS & WORKSHOPS

Illinois State Genealogical Society
Saturday, 10 April 2010
Springfield, Illinois

Note: Times listed are start times.

TOURS

Archives Tour: See what’s available at the Illinois State Archives. 9 AM ___.

ALPL Tour: Two tours to help genealogists discover what’s available at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library. 9:30 AM ___ 11 AM ___.

WORKSHOPS

Workshop-- Military Records: Tracing ancestors using records available at the Illinois State Archives. 11 AM ___.

Workshop-- General Land office Records & Federal Township Plats: Find out about the Public Lands Survey, General Land Office records, and several ways to use these records online. 1 PM ___.

Workshops-- Illinois Death Certificate Assistance: Learn how to find and copy death certificates, 1916-1947. 9 AM ___, 11 AM ___, & 1 PM ___.

COST

Cost per session: $10, members; $12, non-members. Please select a first and second choice (when available) for each session you are planning to attend. Send check payable to ISGS to ISGS, P.O. Box 10195, Springfield, IL 62791-0195.

MORE INFO

Need more info? Contact their Newsletter Editor at isgsnewsletter@yahoo.com.

And don’t forget- their Fall Conference this year is in Peoria, Illinois, at the historic Hotel Pere Marquette. The date is 23 October 2010 (a Saturday). This year’s conference includes a Youth Workshop for children ages 12-15.

Need more info? Go here.

ROME OF THE WEST

A blog about Catholicism in St. Louis, including St. Louis Catholic history, culture, manners, and morals by a guy who takes his faith very seriously:

LINK

NOTE: Post linked to above includes 20 beautiful photographs of various St. Louis area attractions.

STLGS SPECIAL EVENTS CALENDAR

St. Louis Genealogical Society has a number of special events planned for 2010:

You are cordially invited to the 2010 St. Louis Genealogical Society Open House which will take place on Sunday, January 24 at the STLGS office from 1:00 - 3:00 pm. You can: tour the office and meet the volunteer staff, meet the Special Interest Group (SIG) leaders, Talk with experienced genealogists, examine genealogical software, learn about current projects, use the office reading room and reference materials.

Other StLGS special events planned for 2010 are:

March 12-- Trivia Night at the Maryland Heights Community Centre
May 15-- Family History Conference at the Maryland Heights Community Centre
July 31-- Summer Seminar at the Viking Conference Center
Sept. 13-17-- St. Louis Research Week at the STLGS office
Oct. 23-- Speaker Series at the Viking Conference Center
Nov. 14-21-- Salt Lake City Research Trip
Dec. 5-- Book Jamboree at the STLGS office

For more information and/or directions, visit the Society's website or call 314-647-8547.

THE SEARCH FOR MOSGA JOURNAL AUTHORS

The Genealogy Guys on their podcasts page mention MoSGA’s ongoing search for authors of articles that have appeared in our Journal. We need their permissions so that we can digitize the Journal and make it available on our website. If you have written one or more articles for the Journal, or know someone who has, please ask them to contact us here . Thanks!

Genealogy Guys Podcasts page

ST. LOUIS PUBLIC LIBRARY 2010 PROGRAMS

PLEASE NOTE: All programs are sponsored or co-sponsored by St. Louis Public Library. All programs are free and open to the public. Program location is noted for each program.

January 16 10 a.m.-Noon. Research at the Illinois State Archives. Join us as we discuss the wealth of resources for the genealogist and historian available at this Springfield, Illinois institution. Buder Branch. To register or for more information, call 314-539-0381 or email tpearson@slpl.org.

January 20 6:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m. Illinois 24/7: the Best Internet Sources for Researching Illinois Ancestors. Join us as we discuss the very best sources for researching Illinois ancestors on the Internet (a few pay, most free). Hayner Public Library, 326 Belle Street, Alton, Illinois 62202. To register or for more information, call 314-539-0381 or email tpearson@slpl.org .

February 11 7:00 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Researching War of 1812 Ancestors. Join us as we discuss book, microfilm, manuscript, and Internet resources for researching our War of 1812 ancestors. Edwardsville Public Library, 112 S. Kansas St., Edwardsville, Illinois 62025. To register or for more information, call 314-539-0381 or email tpearson@slpl.org.

February 20 10 a.m.-Noon. The Last Full Measure of Devotion: Researching American Military Casualties. Join us as we discuss sources of Information about American soldiers, sailors, Marines, and airmen who died while in uniform, 1775-present. Central Library. To register or for more information, call 314-539-0381or email tpearson@slpl.org .

March 3 7:30 p.m.-9 p.m. On Beyond Google: Search Engines Made Simple for the Befuddled Genealogist. Learn to search smarter and faster. We'll cover search engines (Google isn't the only one!); metasearch engines; advanced search; specialty search engines; searchable concepts; keywords; Boolean operators; and framing search queries. St. Luke's Parish Hall, 301 N. Church St., Belleville, IL 62220. To register or for more information, call 314-539-0381or email tpearson@slpl.org .

March 13 10 a.m.-Noon. Spring Cleaning Your Computer: Routine Maintenance Tips and Tricks for the Befuddled Genealogist. Simple ways to declutter your computer; speed up your operating system; keep track of files and folders; manage email, downloads, and bookmarks; and stay one step ahead of hackers and other online predators. Note: Primarily for users of Windows operating systems. Buder Branch. To register or for more information, call 314-539-0381 or email tpearson@slpl.org .

April 10 10 a.m.-Noon. Bullets, Breastworks, and Bayonets: Weapons and Tactics of the Civil War. Join us as we discuss weapons and tactics used by Civil War soldiers and armies. Central Library. To register or for more information, call 314-539-0381 or email tpearson@slpl.org.

Central Library
1301 Olive Street
St. Louis, MO 63103
(314) 539-0381

Buder Branch Library
4401 Hampton Avenue
St. Louis, MO 63109
(314) 352-2900

Pre-registration is recommended but not required. Should room fill up, registered persons are seated first. To register or for more information, please call 539-0381. Parking at Central Library is free on Saturdays, and parking on the Buder Branch Library lot is always free.

It’s easy to add you to my programs notification list. Just email me at tpearson@slpl.org and use NOTIFY in the subject line- that’s all you need to do!

Tuesday, January 05, 2010

WHERE PAPER COMES FROM

You probably already know about rag paper and wood pulp paper, but you probably didn’t know that paper can also be made from hemp, kenaf, mulberry bark, sugar cane, bananas, wheat, rice, and elephant dung:

LINK

THE LIBRARY OF DUST

3,500 copper canisters containing the ashes of inmates of the Oregon State Asylum:

LINK

NOTE: Hope this story doesn't inspire thieves to steal the valuable copper canisters!

69 COOLEST WEB APPS OF 2009

I’d never heard of most of them prior to seeing this list:

LINK

RECONNECT

If you’ve got computer equipment that you need to recycle (and wouldn’t mind getting a tax credit for), here’s your answer:

LINK

Saturday, January 02, 2010

ALLEN COUNTY GENEALOGY CENTER BLOG & FACEBOOK PAGE

From Genealogy Gems: News from the Fort Wayne Library
No. 70, December 31, 2009

On January 1, 2010, the Genealogy Center will debut its Facebook page and a new blog. Both are designed to be conduits through which you can easily and quickly stay in-touch with programs and activities in the Center. The official Genealogy Center blog is located at:

http://genealogycenter.wordpress.com.

The Center’s genealogy librarians will post announcements, upcoming programs, and research tips to keep you informed. Through the comments section, we hope to offer another avenue for dialogue with our customers.

You can become a fan of the Genealogy Center on Facebook by searching for "Genealogy Center" within http://www.facebook.com. On our Facebook page you can learn up-to-date information about the Center and connect with other researchers.

With both the Genealogy Center blog and Facebook, we hope to network with the genealogy community and provide timely information on the variety of offerings of the Genealogy Center.

MIDWEST FAMILY HISTORY EXPO 2010

LET YOUR LIGHT SHINE!

Family History Expos are fun, exciting, amazing opportunities to learn about the techniques and technology available to trace your roots. You will be so enlightened here you'll want to come back again and again.

Family History Expos has become a beacon of light for those trying to find their way through the sea of information in which their deepest family roots are buried. Every event is another lighthouse strategically placed to guide you through this journey.

We invite you to come kindle your own light of understanding and share what you have learned with friends and family so they too can navigate the exciting high seas of family history research!

WHO: Brought to you by Family History Expos.com and sponsors: FamilySearch, RootsMagic, and Generation Maps.

WHAT: Midwest Family History Expo 2010

WHERE:

Holiday Inn KCI Airport & KCI Expo Center
11728 NW Ambassador Drive
Kansas City, MO

WHEN:

Friday July 30th, 2010. 8 AM to 6 PM
Saturday July 31st, 2010. 8 AM to 6 PM
At the door registration begins at: 7 AM Friday & 7:30 AM Saturday

COST:

Exhibit Hall: $3

Keynote Address: Open free to the public

Classes and Workshops:

Early Bird Cost: $55 (ends May 31, 2010)
Pre-Registration: $65 (ends July 17th, 2010)
Single Day Registration: $40
At the Door: $75 for both days or $12 per session

Register right now online and receive immediate access to all class syllabi!

Note: Online class syllabi are available only to those who register online.

Your paid registration includes:

· Printed Event Program
· Name Tag
· CD syllabus (to print your syllabus in advance, register online now and get immediate access!) Note: Family History Expos will print your syllabus for an additional $25.00. Printed syllabi will be available at the event and can be shipped after the event. Purchaser pays shipping.
· Goody Bag stuffed full of coupons, discount offers, information and free trials
· Opportunity to have a FREE research consultation with a professional researcher at the Family History Expos Ask-the-Pros booth (be sure to bring your research questions and sign up at the booth)

Exhibit Hall

Imagine, a room full of exhibitors with amazing products and services all designed to make your family history research faster, easier, more productive and fun. Here you will find hundreds of people just like you who share your passion for family history. Network and learn.The public is invited to visit our exhibitors absolutely free.

Keynote Address

On the opening day of every event, the public is invited to participate in our Family History Expos keynote address. There's no charge to listen to and learn from our prestigious keynote speaker.

Presenter Bios

Professional genealogists, technological experts and seasoned family historians will shed light on the newest and most successful techniques and technology to assist you in your family history research. Please join us.

Classes and Workshops

Get the most out of our Family History Expos by registering at a minimal cost for our family history and genealogy workshops. These classes and workshops are taught by and facilitated by experienced, successful researchers who have the best and easiest ways to:

· Research family history
· Document family history
· Share family history

More info? Go here.

MISSOURI GENEALOGY PAGE

On GenealogyWise, the social networking site:

LINK

There’s also an Illinois Genealogy Page:

LINK

And pages for various other states:

North Carolina

Alabama

Iowa

And countries:

Germany

Etc.

USING GOOGLE ALERTS TO FIND YOUR ANCESTORS

Seen on a genealogy listserve:

Use Google Alerts to find your ancestor - **be sure to use quotes around a phrase** to limit 'hits' to a specific person:

"Elizabeth Barker"

Google will forward email updates of the latest relevant Google results (web, news, blogs, videos, etc.) based on this phrase. So, all Elizabeth Barker webpage appearances would be forwarded (but not all pages with just “Barker” on them)

Here is the link to the FAQ to learn more, with sign up info:

http://www.google.com/support/alerts/

NOTE: You can also set up alerts for “Pearson family” or other families of interest. I set up one alert to pull in “Pearson family” Web items, and a second alert to pull in “Pearson family” blog items (merely a matter of personal preference). Here again, be sure to include the quotes when setting up family alerts.

HAPPY NEW YEAR!

We at MoSGA Messenger would like to wish all our regular readers a happy, healthy, and prosperous New Year!

GOVERNOR’S HUMANITIES AWARDS

Each year the Governor of Missouri and the Missouri Humanities Council confer the Governor's Humanities Awards on individuals and organizations whose achievements set an example worthy of statewide attention. The awards recognize outstanding teaching in Missouri schools, outstanding community outreach activities by individuals and humanities institutions, and exemplary interpretive practices in libraries, history organizations, or other humanities organizations. In addition, the Governor's Humanities Awards recognize outstanding books that have increased our understanding and appreciation of Missouri's history and culture.

Nominations are being accepted for the following awards categories:

Excellence in Education: recognizes one or more teachers of English, history, languages, or social studies, grades K-12, in Missouri's public or private schools.

Exemplary Community Achievement: recognizes an individual or group who has made a special contribution to a community's understanding of and support for humanities-related endeavors on the local and/or state level.

Distinguished Literary Achievement: recognizes an individual or group whose book or publication (fiction, non-fiction, or poetry) has increased our understanding and appreciation of Missouri's history and culture.

Nominations will be accepted until February 15, 2010. All nominations must be submitted using the nomination form and have supporting materials, including a minimum of two letters of support; resume, Curriculum Vita, or summary of achievements (3-page maximum); 1 to 2 page summary describing the reason the nominee is deserving of the award and how the nominee fits the category; additional support materials. For the book award nomination, at least three copies of the book or publication must accompany nomination materials.

LINK