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MoSGA Messenger, The Official Blog of the Missouri State Genealogical Association
Serving Missouri ancestor seekers since 7 November 2007

Tom Pearson, Editor

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Thursday, December 31, 2009

GREENWOOD CEMETERY FUNERARY ART

Cemetery art? If you consider yourself a genealogist, you won’t be able to resist looking at this website:

LINK

Note: Greenwood Cemetery is a traditionally African-American cemetery in St. Louis, Missouri. Many of these images are truly eye-catching!

AUSSIE ARISTOCRATS

Australians are more likely to descend from the nobility or a military man than they are to have a convict ancestor:

LINK

Note: Err-- but only a bit more likely

R.I.P. ROBERT G. HEFT

Robert G. Heft has died. Who was he, you ask? Why, he designed the 50-star flag:

LINK

SAY GOODBYE TO A HERO

Robert L. Howard has died. Don’t recall the name? Well, you should:

LINK

MILBLOGGING

Interested in military blogs and bloggers? Go no further:

LINK

DISCOVER YOUR FAMILY WITH MISSOURI DIGITAL HERITAGE

An article by Secretary of State Robin Carnahan:

LINK

WHICH FORMER PRESIDENT HAS THE BIGGEST ONE?

We’re talking presidential libraries, of course:

LINK

DR. SAUGRAIN AND 19TH CENTURY ST. LOUIS

New blog to take a look at:

LINK

Wednesday, December 30, 2009

VELOCIRAPTORS WEREN’T SO TOUGH…

The humor magazine, The Onion, has posted the following article:

Dinosaurs Sadly Extinct Before the Invention of the Bazooka

LINK

Note: Animal lovers will definitely prefer to gaze at a “Cute Kitties” calendar rather than read this (tongue-in-cheek) article…

RETURN OF THE FLAGS

Story on Mass Moments website about return of Massachusetts Civil War regimental flags to the Massachusetts Statehouse:

LINK

ILLINOIS HISTORY CALENDAR

Calendar of exhibits and programs sponsored by Illinois historical societies and museums:

LINK

ILLINOIS HISTORICAL MARKERS

Search them by county or by title:

LINK

WORLD WAR I PHOTOGRAPHS

A collection of nearly 100 photographs from the J. Patras Collection:

LINK

Tuesday, December 29, 2009

FOREIGN SERVICE INSTITUTE LANGUAGE COURSES

Quickly learn the basics of numerous foreign languages (for free) using courses developed by the U.S. Foreign Service in the 1960s. These courses won’t make you a scholar in your chosen language- they were designed to enable students to easily carry out basic activities like sightseeing, eating, renting a car or hotel room, etc., in the language of that foreign country. Courses include text and audio sections:

LINK

GOVERNMENT COMIC BOOKS

Our U.S. Government, as part of its efforts to educate its citizens, has produced hundreds of comic books on various topics. The University of Nebraska at Lincoln has a large collection of these items, many of which it has digitized:

LINK

NSA DECLASSIFICATION INITIATIVES

Who says government agencies are immune to public pressure? Even the spooks at the National Security Agency declassify some documents and document finding aids as a result of continued public interest in certain topics:

LINK

SPLIT VIDEO

A free download that allows you to employ split screen effects in movies you create using Windows Movie Maker:

LINK

Saturday, December 26, 2009

THE PRIVATE HISTORY OF A CAMPAIGN THAT FAILED

Mark Twain tried to be a Confederate soldier, but he was born a writer, not a fighter:

LINK

SEVEN CIVIL WAR STORIES YOU DIDN’T LEARN IN HIGH SCHOOL

The Wall Street Journal ran an article on this topic, but this blogger has produced an even more intriguing list:

LINK

MILITARY COLLECTIONS AT ANCESTRY.COM:

A guide to what’s available:

LINK

PROLOGUE MAGAZINE

I’ve praised Prologue magazine here before, but here’s another blogger weighing in on Prologue’s wonderful online articles about doing Civil War research using materials from the National Archives:

LINK

FREE 2010 CALENDAR

From their website:

Free 2010 Calendar. Fully editable calendar to print in Microsoft Word Doc format. Use them to print or to edit as a: planner, school calendar, schedule calendar, church calendar etc.:

LINK

Thursday, December 24, 2009

HOW BUSY IS THE INTERNET?

Very, very busy- and this graphic shows you just how busy it is every single day:

LINK

Note: For example: more than 210 billion (yes, billion) emails are sent every day…

2,400 REASONS TO SWITCH...

If you’re using IE8, here are 2,400 reasons why you should probably switch to a different browser:

LINK

IF NEGLECTED CEMETERIES GET YOUR GOAT…

If you or your genealogical society is faced with the prospect of rescuing a neglected cemetery, perhaps you need to get yourself some goats. That’s what they did in one North Carolina county. Seems they heard that goats will eat anything, and they’re putting that theory to the test:

LINK

PASS THE PRESBYTERIAN, PLEASE…

Everybody’s family has a skeleton in its closet, but it usually isn’t the skeleton of a missionary that our forebears cooked and ate for dinner:

LINK

WELL, ADAM AND EVE ARE ON PAGE 932…

You may think you put a lot of work into your family history book, but unless it’s 13,070 pages long this guy has you beat:

LINK

Tuesday, December 22, 2009

BEST FREE MAC DOWNLOADS FOR 2009

Lifehacker also has a list of best free downloads for all you Mac users:

LINK

BEST FREE WINDOWS DOWNLOADS FOR 2009

Lifehacker’s list of best free downloads for people using a Windows OS:

LINK

A SUMMER AT THE FAIR

Walter C. Richards visited the 1904 World’s Fair many times-- and often brought his camera with him:

LINK

Note: Includes some interior views of Fair buildings.

WELCOME TO 1890s KIRKSVILLE

Travel in time to take a stroll through this northeastern Missouri city, courtesy of Pickler Memorial Library (Truman State University):

LINK

Note: Includes city map and guide, photos, and a portrait gallery.

SHAKE YOUR FAMILY TREE DAY

It’s an event being held at each capital city branch of the National Archives (Australia) on 23 February 2010:

LINK

Saturday, December 19, 2009

STARSTRUCK

The Ronald Davis Oral History Collection on the Performing Arts includes:

“…interviews with writers, directors, actors, producers, singers, composers, and vaudeville and burlesque performers. The typed transcripts are housed in DeGolyer Library. A published guide to the collection is also available (for a free copy, please contact us). Among the hundreds of performers featured in the Davis Collection are Lucille Ball, Rosemary Clooney, Rock Hudson, Mary Martin, and Gregory Peck.”

This collection is housed in the DeGolyer Library at Southern Methodist University:

LINK

A BIG PHOTO COLLECTION FOR A VERY BIG STATE

The Lawrence T. Jones III Texas Photographs Collection includes around 5,000 photographs of Texas persons, places, and things, ca. 1846-1945. Southern Methodist University has digitized these images and made them available for viewing on their website:

LINK

MISSOURI JUDICIAL RECORDS

From the Missouri State Archives website:

“For many years, the Missouri State Archives has worked with local court officials to help preserve, index and microfilm their records. Now, through the Missouri Digital Heritage Initiative, digitized collections of court files are available to researchers online. Records are available by county, court and year; and are searchable by name and keyword. At this time, the digital collections include:

· Greene County Circuit Court (1856-1873, non-inclusive)
· Jasper County Circuit Court (1860-1876, non-inclusive)
· New Madrid County Probate Court (1805-1830)
· Saint Charles County Circuit Court (1805-1835)
· Saint Louis City Probate Court (1876-1900, separated from county in 1876)
· Saint Louis County Probate Court (1804-1876) “

Interested? Go here:

LINK

HANNIBAL CITY DIRECTORIES

Directories for the period 1859-1929 (various years) available online for use by anybody, courtesy of Hannibal Free Public Library:

LINK

MISSOURI CORONERS INQUEST DATABASE

Abstracts of coroner / medical examiner records for various Missouri counties for the time period 1849-1932 (years available varies by county). Counties currently included:

Andrew
Cape Girardeau
Clinton’Perry
St. Francois
St. Louis City
St. Louis County

Abstracted info includes:

Case number
Name of deceased
Age or date of birth
Race
Gender
Date of death
Cause of death
Location of death
Microfilm reel number
Box and file number for original record

LINK

Friday, December 18, 2009

THIS YEAR IN GOOGLE

What did the Googlers do during 2009? Plenty—- check out this list in case you need convincing:

LINK

TENNESSEE CIVIL WAR SOURCEBOOK

Guide to Civil War related institutions and activities in the Volunteer State:

LINK

NASHVILLE BELLES SEE THE ELEPHANT

Notes: “Fancy woman” is 19th century slang for a mistress or prostitute. “Seeing the elephant” is Civil War slang for the first experience of combat.

From: H-Net US Civil War History discussion list:
Date: Thursday, December 17, 2009 8:34 AM

A Little Known Story about the Battle of Nashville (December 15-16, 1864)

Two of the fancy women of College Street went out on Friday [16th] to see the fight. By some means their carriage got outside of the picket lines and inside the rebel lines before they were aware of the fact. Seeing Rebel soldiers about, they ordered the hackman to “bout ship” and put for town, but before he could do so, the carriage was surrounded by Rebel cavalry, who took the establishment in charge, believing the occupants were spies.

They were sent to the rear and placed under guard, where they remained until the retreat commenced, and then they were ordered to move southward, another nymph du pave having in the meantime been picked up and placed in the same hack. At length the horses gave out -- they could no longer draw the load through the mud; so three cavalrymen were ordered to take them in charge. The women protested, and begged consideration for their laces and valuable silk dresses, but without avail. They were compelled to evacuate the carriage and mount in front or behind the riders as each preferred, and thus they entered Franklin, literally covered with mud. They were placed under guard at a hotel, and closely questioned by an officer, who seemed at a loss t know what to do with them, whether to send them south as spies, or send them adrift.

At length, on Saturday [17th], the Federal cavalry came thundering along, and the women were left in their room. On Sunday night [18th] they arrived here, one of them riding behind a Federal guard, and the other two riding an old mule, and thus they were landed at the door of the Provost Marshal’s office, who, after taking evidence of their identity, discharged them.

[Nashville Dispatch, December 22, 1864.]

James B. Jones, Jr. D.A.
Public Historian
Editor, The Courier
Tennessee Historical Commission
2941 Lebanon Rd.
Nashville, TN 37243-0442
615-532-1550 ext. 115
http://www.tennessee.civilwarsourcebook.com

GOOGLE BOOKS ISN’T JUST BOOKS…

It also provides access to quite a few magazines, including quite a few very recent publications:

LINK

MOSGA AWARDS 21ST CENTURY FUND GRANTS

The Missouri State Genealogical Association recently awarded two grants from its 21st Century Fund. Established in 2005, the fund offers grants up to $1,000 to Missouri societies, libraries and/or archives to promote preservation and publication of Missouri genealogical data.

Butler County Archive in Poplar Bluff, Missouri received a grant to purchase acid free pamphlet files and associated supplies to organize the growing number of donated genealogical materials. Local volunteers will assist in organizing family histories, genealogy magazines, research books and pamphlets. Once processed, these materials will be available to researchers.

Scott County Historical and Genealogy Society in Benton, Missouri received a grant to support the research and preparation for a publication on county landmarks. The book will cover the period from 1822, when the county was established, to the present. The Society plans to interview senior citizens, search local newspapers and probate records for pertinent documentation on the estimated 75 county landmarks.

January 1, 2010 begins a new grant cycle. Grant applications and guidelines are available on MoSGAs Web site www.mosga.org Application deadline is April 30, 2010 with grants awarded prior to July 1, 2010.

The 21st Century Fund is supported by generous donations from the genealogical community. If you wish to make a tax-deductible contribution, please send it to MoSGA, 21st Century Fund, PO Box 833, Columbia MO 65205-0833. Thank you for your continuing support.

Martha L. Henderson, Chair
21st Century Fund Committee
Missouri State Genealogical Association

Thursday, December 17, 2009

PHOTO STORY 3

Those of you in the St. Louis area may find this of interest:

The St Clair County Genealogical Society will meet Thursday, January 7, 7:30 p.m., St Luke’s Parish, 226 N. Church Street, Belleville (IL). Topic will be using slideshows to tell your genealogical story. Speaker Mark Bauer will demonstrate how to use Microsoft’s free Photo Story 3 software to create family slideshows using your digital photos. Burn your slideshow to DVD and share with family and friends in six simple steps. For more information on SCCGS, visit our web site at http://www.stclair-ilgs.org/stchome.htm.

Jacque Devine
SCCGS Publicity Chairman

EVERYTHING IS RELATIVE

From: Anastasia Tyler
Sent: Tuesday, December 15, 2009 8:55 AM

Leading Family History Web Site Discovers Family Connection between Two of the World’s Most Influential Men

PROVO, UTAH – Dec. 15, 2009 – Ancestry.com, the world’s largest online resource for family history, confirmed today that President Barack Obama and billionaire financial investor Warren Buffett are more than just political allies -- they are actually related. The discovery, made by Ancestry.com family history experts, determined that the men are 7th cousins three times removed, related through a 17th-century Frenchman named Mareen Duvall.

The No.1 family history Web site revealed that Duvall, who immigrated to Maryland from France in the 1650s, is Pres. Obama’s 9th great-grandfather and Buffett’s 6th great-grandfather. Duvall arrived in America as an indentured servant. By 1659, he had purchased property in Anne Arundel County, Maryland, which he later named “Middle Plantation.” According to historical records, Duvall belonged to a religious sect called the Jacobites, was a planter and merchant and was “conservative in his political life.” And while Obama and Buffett may not share the political views of their great-grandfather, Duvall’s servant-to-landowner life journey may offer clues into the successes of his influential grandsons.

“We’ve all watched Pres. Obama and Warren Buffett’s ongoing association, from Buffett’s official endorsement of Obama’s 2008 presidential campaign to their sometimes differing views on economic policy,” said Anastasia Tyler, a genealogist at Ancestry.com. “Like most family members, the President and Buffett may not always agree on everything, but this latest discovery confirming they are related may shed light on why the two seem to see eye-to-eye on many issues.”

The new-found connection between Pres. Obama and Warren Buffett is one of many fascinating discoveries Ancestry.com uncovered within the President’s family tree:

German Roots – Earlier this year, Ancestry.com confirmed that Pres. Obama has German roots through his 6th great-grandfather Johann Conrad Wolfley from Besigheim, Wuerttemberg, Germany.

Pres. O’Bama? – In 2007, Ancestry.com uncovered the President’s family history connection to Moneygall, Ireland. Pres. Obama’s 3rd great-grandfather Falmouth Kearney left his hometown of Moneygall for the New World, landing in New York harbor in 1850.

Celebrity Connection – In 2007, Ancestry.con linked the leader of the Free World to one of Hollywood’s leading men-– Brad Pitt. The family history Web site confirmed the two are 9th cousins.

For anyone interested in discovering who might be a long-lost relative or a famous figure in the family tree, visit www.ancestry.com.

FENCES

If you've got so many icons on your desktop that you're losing track of what all you've got, you may want to take a look at this free desktop organizer:

LINK

MICROSOFT SECURITY ESSENTIALS

Need a free virus checker for your computer? Microsoft is offering one that’s receiving some favorable publicity from independent evaluators:

LINK

And go here to download MS Security Essentials:

LINK

Wednesday, December 16, 2009

REQUEST FOR 2010 CONFERENCE SPEAKERS

Request for proposals for supporting speakers for the 2010 MoSGA Conference.

$100 plus conference registration per 1-hour lecture or $200 plus conference registration per 2-hour workshop. Our keynote speaker, Roger Minert, will be lecturing on German research. Proposals must be submitted by January 30, 2010 by email attachment to:

jschultz@mcpl.lib.mo.us;

or by postal mail to:

Missouri State Genealogical Society
PO Box 833
Columbia, Missouri 65205

The conference will be held August 13 and 14, 2010 in Jefferson City, Missouri. Please designate preferred date in your proposal.


Janice Schultz
Genealogy Librarian
Midwest Genealogy Center
Mid-Continent Public Library
3440 S. Lee's Summit Rd.
Independence, MO 64055
http://www.mcpl.lib.mo.us
Phone (816) 252-7228
Fax (816) 254-7146

TAKING THE MYSTERY OUT OF COPYRIGHT

Site specially designed for students and teachers:

LINK

QUESTIONS ABOUT COPYRIGHT?

Get your answers here, including a Very nice “Copyright Basics” PDF that can be read online or downloaded:

LINK

ANCESTRY.COM LAUNCHES ENHANCED U.S. CENSUS COLLECTION

From: Anastasia Tyler
Sent: Thursday, December 10, 2009

In a survey last year, top on the wish list of Ancestry.com members was improved images for U.S. Federal Censuses, one of the richest sources of information for family history searches. Improving this collection has been a top priority at Ancestry.com throughout 2009.

Today we’ve launched enhancements for six U.S. Census collections-– in addition to the improvements on six censuses released a few months ago. In all, we’ve gone through more than 200 million records to improve images and many indexes.

Enhanced and clearer images are now available for the 1790-1900 censuses, and indexes have been improved for the 1850, 1860, 1870, and 1900 censuses. All of the images have a cleaner, crisper look. And occasionally names can be read that were illegible before—- either because they were too light, too dark, too blurry, too faded, or covered in tape, etc.

If you have had a hard time finding your ancestors in these censuses, it’s time to search again. Images already attached to family trees will be automatically updated, so census records saved there can easily be revisited.

http://www.ancestry.com/

A REAL LONG SHOT

If you’re interested in military history and get the History Channel, this upcoming program may well be of interest:

Sunday, December 20, 2009-- 9-11pm -- Sniper: Inside the Crosshairs.

The deadliest weapon on the battlefield is neither bullet nor gun; it's the lone sniper. Journey inside the science and psychology behind the greatest shots in military history, through the scope of the world's most extreme marksmen. Deconstruct the missions, ranging from Vietnam to Iraq to Afghanistan, presented by the men who were there and pulled the trigger. For the first time on American television, Canadian sniper Robert Furlong tells the story of his history-making shot in Afghanistan--striking a Taliban fighter from 1.5 miles away. Ballistics... Tactics... Weaponry... Stalking... This two-hour special examines these critical components in vivid detail, combining interviews with cinematic reenactments, CGI and present day shooting demonstrations to put the viewer squarely inside the crosshairs.

Link to History Channel

SNOWCRYSTALS.COM

If you live in a place that gets little or no snow (or if you just happen to love snow and cold weather), you’ll be fascinated by the photographs of snowflakes and snow crystals on this website:

LINK

Note: Includes a “Snowflake Primer” if you’re curious about where the white stuff comes from!

Tuesday, December 15, 2009

LETTERS FROM GRATIOT STREET PRISON

Boone County Historical Society’s Online Archives has posted transcripts of some Civil War letters written by Joseph Cooper Babb, a young Confederate who contracted smallpox while at the St. Louis Civil War prison:

LINK

Saturday, December 12, 2009

THE INTERNET IS A WONDERFUL THING

I was interested in your article on social networking in last month's RootsWeb Review and thought I'd share my story with you.

My Mum died unexpectedly of tuberculosis just before my first birthday and I was brought up by my paternal grandparents. As I aged, I became interested in genealogy and dug up a lot of family history about my father's side. But I never really sought out my Mum's family, and having lost touch with them, things were at a standstill.

The internet of course provided some help in tracing certificates and census records, but only a few months ago I found on a family group message board a note from someone who seemed to mention a familiar name. The author of the post had no linking e-mail address, but had used a joined forename and surname as a user name. So I looked on Facebook and there was just one person with that name, living in Australia. I dropped them an e-mail asking, "Was your maiden name xxxx by any chance?"

"Yes" they replied. "Do I know you?"

It was the daughter of one of my Mum's brothers. She had the phone number of other siblings of my Mum, who lived about half an hour away from me. I have had a great time meeting my newly discovered uncles and aunts. My uncle even took me to my great-grandfather's grave-- which I'd never have found.

The final crunch. I only had one studio portrait picture of my Mum, which I thought was the only photo in existence. My newly found uncle had a picture of her holding me as a tiny baby, just before she died. Not a dry eye in the house!

The internet is a wonderful thing.

George in England

Previously published in RootsWeb Review: 9 December 2009, Vol. 12, No. 12

HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS

Genealogy Tip
by Anna Fechter

Home for the Holidays

What comes to the top of your mind when you think of the holidays? When I asked my co-worker this question she replied, "Family of course!" Now this may be due to the fact that we work for a family oriented company but I would like to think that most people would have answered the same way. During the holiday season generally families gather together so use this time to add to your family history research.

There are a few things that I like to have with me when we are attending family events,

1. Camera
2. Digital recorder or video recorder
3. Pen and paper
4. My research binder
5. My laptop (if I can)

Here's the why:

1. If you have a camera on hand not only can you take pictures of family members but you can also take pictures of their pictures, or family belongings. On one trip I took a picture of the front page of a family bible that contained a lot of great information.
2. Having a digital or video recorder will allow you to record family stories and if the opportunity arises you can also conduct an interview with a family member. This past summer we interviewed my husband's grandfather who is now at a stage where he is not able to talk much - having the interview where he tells stories, sings songs and just talks about the past is priceless!
3. It never fails that I wish I had Aunt Nancy's email address or my cousin's mailing address. Bringing a pen and paper to events gives me a place to write these things down and I can also distribute my email address or contact information to them.
4. My research binder contains a calendar, a recent copy of the family tree, my research log and the questions that I have not been able to answer. When I am around family I inevitably can add a few names to the tree, cross a few items off my list of questions and I love having the calendar with me to record new additions to the family.
5. My laptop is obviously a great resource for various reasons - and if I have it I don't need many of the other items on my list. The greatest benefit of having my laptop (other than not having to bring anything else) is being able to share all of the cool things I am working on - my family book, the online family tree, records I have located, etc - and not only have them look at these things but I can send them notes, or invite them to the tree right then and there. I have found that when my family members realize that there is something to family history beyond sitting in dusty archives that they want to get involved and it gets them excited.

I hope you are as fortunate as I am and that you are able to visit with family over the next month. Before you gather think of how they can help you with your research and what you could accomplish by bringing a few simple items along.

Happy Holidays!

Previously published in RootsWeb Review: 9 December 2009, Vol. 12, No. 12

BEN'S GUIDE TO U.S. GOVERNMENT

Kid-friendly (grades K-12) guide to the U.S. Government that uses Ben Franklin as its spokesperson-- great starting point for a term paper or class report:

LINK

U.S. GPO WINTER CATALOG

They've issued a special winter catalog, with items like the following still available to give as Christmas gifts:

* National Park Service posters, displaying the talents of noted American graphic artist Charley Harper, whose works are highly collectible.
* Borden's Dream: the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, DC, an engaging history-memoir covering Walter Reed Army Medical Center's early history, filled with stories about the people and events that shaped its evolution as an institution.
* The FBI: A Centennial History, 1908-2008. This new coffee-table history of the FBI, celebrating the Bureau's 100th anniversary, is something anyone would enjoy giving or receiving as gift.
* A Botanic Garden for the Nation: the United States Botanic Garden, a beautifully illustrated publication presenting the first comprehensive look at the U.S. Botanic Garden in Washington, D.C.
* The Healthy Woman, which includes comprehensive coverage of key health topics affecting women, the latest recommendations for health screenings, exams, and immunizations by age and health risk profile, and much more.
* The U.S. Government Printing Office Style Manual, a major reference source for professionals involved in the field of printing and publishing.

LINK

Friday, December 11, 2009

TRANSPORTATION TO AUSTRALIA

A podcast from the National Archives (UK):

Transportation to Australia, 1787-1868:

LINK

METROPOLITAN POLICE

A podcast from the National Archives (UK):

Metropolitan Police: Its Creation & Records of Service:

LINK

GREETINGS FROM MYHERITAGE.COM

Dear friends,

On behalf of everyone at MyHeritage.com and myself, I would like to wish you and your family a happy and peaceful holiday season, surrounded by your loved ones.

These special days-- when family gatherings bring together several generations-- are the best time for family historians and genealogists to take photographs, record video, talk about family history and gather more information about our families, so it can be preserved for the future.

In the new year, we wish you success in achieving breakthroughs in challenging research "brick walls."

With best wishes,

Daniel Horowitz
Genealogy and Translation Manager
MyHeritage.com

NEWS FROM TRI-COUNTY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY

Our latest newsletter has been posted on our website at:

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~motcogs/

Regards,
Nancy Thompson
Tri-County Genealogical Society
218 W. Walnut St., Nevada, MO 64772

web: http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~motcogs/
email: tricountygenealogy@centurytel.net

Thursday, December 10, 2009

ARMY HERITAGE & EDUCATION CENTER CIVIL WAR PHOTOS COLLECTION

This collection of digitized photos was unveiled in November 2009:

LINK

Note: Click on “What’s New in Our Online Collection: MOLLUS- Massachusetts Photograph Collection.”

FREE ACCESS TO WWII RECORDS ON FOOTNOTE

Now through the end of December:

LINK

NARA PROPOSED RENOVATIONS

Dear researchers,

Proposed renovations at the National Archives will affect all NARA researchers. As you have probably heard, if the changes materialize, some research space at the downtown facility will be converted to offices, exhibits, and other uses, and research services will have to be reconfigured. To assure that research resources are enhanced, rather than diminished, we again appeal— urgently-- for your help.

Several notices have circulated about an extremely important congressional subcommittee hearing later this month. The hearing of the Subcommittee on Information Policy, Census, and National Archives, which oversees NARA, will examine the National Archives mission. The proposed changes at Archives-1 will be discussed. The new Archivist of the United States, David Ferriero, will testify.

This is our opportunity to voice concerns and priorities to congressional leaders. Please participate by 1) writing to the members of the subcommittee (details below); and 2) attending the hearing if you are in the Washington DC area (details below).

1. CONTACT SUBCOMMITTEE MEMBERS: It is critical that we contact every member of the subcommittee in advance, to 1) encourage them to attend and participate in the meeting, 2) to express our concerns, and 3) to urge them to make researcher services a priority. Please take time now to send each of them a note. It is especially important for constituents of the subcommittee members to contact those members. (See below for list of subcommittee members, and suggestions for writing.)

2. ATTEND THE HEARING: If you are in the Washington DC area on 16 December, please attend the hearing. Members of Congress take careful note of attendance at such hearings. A well-attended meeting will communicate that researchers care about what happens at NARA.Wednesday, 16 December 2009; 2 p.m. Rayburn House Office Building, room 2154

ALSO, if you are in the DC area, a public meeting will be held the following day, 17 December 2009, at 1:00 p.m. at NARA specifically to discuss the proposed changes. If you can make that meeting also, please put it on your calendar.

SUGGESTIONS FOR WRITING TO SUBCOMMITTEE MEMBERS:

Keep your message to one page.

At the TOP of thee message, identify your reason for writing. For example: “Re: Information Policy Subcommittee Hearing on National Archives, December 16.”

If at all possible, write an individualized letter (you can cite some issues below, or add others; a sample letter appears below).

Contact each member only once about the hearing.

Be succinct. Readers should be able to read and understood the message in one minute. Specify your request in the first or second sentence. In another two or three sentences explain how important it is for the member to attend and participate in the hearing.

Specify if you are writing as an individual or representing a group.

Issues you may wish to address (among others you might include):

Renovations at Archives-1 (downtown) should aim to make it a world-class research facility.

Reconsider decisions already made (on the Constitution side of the building) so the result will optimally serve the public and researchers without compromising the latter.

Upgrade services, personnel, hardware, and software to bring the research facility in line with other first-rate research facilities in the world.

HOW TO CONTACT SUBCOMMITTEE MEMBERS:


If you live in a member’s district, use the “Write your Representative” site, which provides direct email contact for constituents. Users enter a state +zip code. Use this link:

http://www.house.gov/writerep/

To contact other members, use email if an address appears below (many do not provide email addresses for non-constituents). Otherwise FAX letters. Do not use USPS mail as postal delivery to congressional offices takes very long. (See below.)

If you represent an organization, follow up with a reminder fax the morning of December 15.

SAMPLE LETTER (PLEASE VARY AND PERSONALIZE)

Date
Addressee / address

Re: Information Policy Subcommittee Hearing on National Archives, December 16

Dear ______:

The proposed renovation at the National Archives (Washington, DC facility) is a major concern for all researchers. As [a frequent researcher at NARA, a representative of…] I hope the work being considered will result in upgraded, enhanced research facilities that make it a world-class research facility. Many of us are worried that some changes appear to aggrandize exhibits, the gift shop, and other tourist attractions in the building at the expense of resources serving researchers.

First and foremost, the public documents preserved at NARA should be made accessible to scholars, historians, educators, journalists, artists, family historians, scientists, and other researchers—via up-to-date technology, facilities, and expert archival assistance. In your oversight role, please assure that this is the top priority as renovations proceed. I hope you will be at the subcommittee meeting and take an active role in the proceedings. [I plan to attend the hearing.]

Congressional oversight and support for research services is critical if NARA is to remain a renowned research institution, fulfilling its mission to the American public, and in line with similar facilities in other countries.

Thank you, in advance, for your support. If you wish additional information, please feel free to contact me.

Sincerely,

_______________________________ (Signature)

Name / Affiliation (if any)


LIST OF SUBCOMMITTEE MEMBERS TO CONTACT:

Clay, William Lacy (D-MO, 1st D.)-- Chairman-- phone: (202) 225-2406-- fax: (202) 226-3717

Kanjorski, Paul-- (D-PA, 11th D.)-- phone: 202-225-6511-- fax (202) 225-0764

Maloney, Carolyn-- (D- NY, 14th D.)-- http://tinyurl.com/yzfttfn-- fax: (202) 225-4709

Norton, Eleanor Holmes-- (D--DC)-- phone: (202) 225-8050-- fax: (202) 225-3002

Davis, Danny-- (D-Chicago, 7th D.)-- http://tinyurl.com/yzs8gl6-- fax (202) 225-5641

Driehaus, Steve-- (D-OH, 1st D.)-- http://tinyurl.com/yz637fg-- Fax: (202) 225-3012

Watson, Diane-- (D-CA, 33rd D.)-- phone: 202-225-7084-- fax: (202) 225-2422

Cuellar, Henry-- (D-TX, 28th D.)-- phone: 202-225-1640-- fax: (202) 225-1641

McHenry, Patrick-- (R-NC, 10th D)-- Ranking minority-- phone: (202) 225.2576-- Fax: (202) 225.0316

Westmoreland, Lynn-- (R-GA, 3rd D.)-- Vice Ranking minority-- Phone (202) 225-5901-- Fax (202) 225-2515

Mica, John-- (R-FL, 7th D.)-- http://tinyurl.com/y9bxwuf-- Fax: (202) 226-0821

Chaffetz, Jason-- R-UT, 3rd D.)-- Phone: (202) 225-7751-- Fax: (202) 225-5629

Claire Bettag
1685 34th Street NW
Washington, DC 20007
(202) 625-2598

Wednesday, December 09, 2009

UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE LIBRARY CIVIL WAR DIGITAL COLLECTIONS

From their website:

“The University of Delaware Library announces three new additions to its digital collection of materials related to the American Civil War. All materials were digitized from originals in the Special Collections Department of the University of Delaware Library.

The three new collections are the Pierce Family Papers, the Rosenthal lithographic prints, and the Alexander Gardner photographs.”

LINK

NEWS@ARCHIVES

The free e-newsletter of the National Archives of Australia:

LINK

MAPPING OUR ANZACS

Helpful guide to tracing the service of Australians in World War I from the National Archives of Australia:

LINK

WORLD WAR II ARMY CASUALTIES

Army Battle Casualties and Non-Battle Deaths: Final Report (includes Army Air Corps):

LINK

Note: This is a detailed statistical report-- it does not list individual soldiers & airmen.

Tuesday, December 08, 2009

HOLIDAY READS ON DAILYLIT

They’ll send you any of these items in easy-to-read installments (and it’s a free service):

The holiday season is in full swing, so why not get some cheer by email with one of our holiday reads:

A Christmas Carol
The Little Match Girl
The Gift of the Magi
The Night Before Christmas

LINK

U.S. MARINE CORPS MUSTER ROLLS, 1798-1940

From Ancestry.com Weekly Spotlight:

The muster rolls of the men, women, and apprentices who served in the Marines and Marine Band can be found in the U.S. Marine Corps Muster Rolls, 1798-1940 collection on Ancestry.com.

Whats in the Records?

The muster rolls typically include the Marines name, name of the ship or post, rank, date of enlistment/reenlistment, and where applicable, discharge, death, injury, illness, desertion, apprehension, and court-martial information.

LINK

Saturday, December 05, 2009

ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY HISTORY CENTER DIGITAL COLLECTIONS

Thousands of digitized photos, maps, documents, and manuscripts from the collection of the Allen County (IN) History Center:

LINK

EDINBURGH PASS

A nice list of other Edinburgh attractions covered by the Edinburgh Pass:

LINK

ANATOMY OF AN AAS CATALOG RECORD

If you've ever been curious about what a library catalog record consists of, this diagram should prove very helpful, indeed:

LINK

NOTE: AAS is the American Antiquarian Society!

LAKE CREEK CEMETERY

Listings for Lake Creek Cemetery in Pettis County, Missouri:

LINK

ST. LOUIS GLOBE-DEMOCRAT RETURNS FROM NEWSPAPER LIMBO!

The new online St. Louis Globe-Democrat, which will launch on Tuesday, Dec. 8, has hired several veteran reporters and editors to lead the website's news coverage of the metro area.

Dan Barger has been named the Globe-Democrat's News Editor. Barger is a lifelong resident of St. Louis with 30 years of newspaper experience, including stints as a reporter, editor, and editorial director of the Suburban Journals of greater St. Louis and as Publisher of the Monroe County, Ill., Journals and the Jefferson County, Mo., Journals. He has won numerous awards for editorial writing and was recognized for his work in covering the presidential campaign of Richard Gephardt in 1988.

Named as Senior Online Editor, Gabrielle Biondo, also a St. Louis native who has 10 years of television news experience. She most recently worked as an Online News Producer, Reporter and Anchor for KPLR-TV, Channel 11.

Leading the Globe-Democrat's reporting staff is Steve Birmingham, who brings more than 20 years of experience to the newspaper. Birmingham also is a native of St. Louis and will be responsible for coverage of local and state government, crime and the courts.

In addition to its full-time staff, Globe-Democrat.com readers will recognize the names of several St. Louisians who will serve as contributing writers in the fields of Business, Real Estate, Legal Issues, Health and Medicine, Education, Food, Travel, Entertainment, Fashion and other topics.

"Our readers will be well served not only by our full-time reporters and editors but also by the contributions of all of our contributing writers," said publisher Dan Rositano. "Each is an expert in his or her field and we are happy they are willing to share their expertise with our readers. Each of their columns will be devoted to a timely and interesting topic that would otherwise not be available to our readers."

For more information about the new St. Louis Globe-Democrat or to sign up for our email alerts, please visit our website at www.globe-democrat.com.

(For more information, please contact Dan Rositano at 314-714-2904)

XXIXTH INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS OF THE GENEALOGICAL & HERALDIC SCIENCES

If I had the time (and money) I would go:

XXIXth International Congress of the Genealogical and Heraldic Sciences
12-17 September 2010 in Stuttgart, Germany

Please mind the time for applications (reserve by 28 February 2010 to receive a substantial discount) and send this e-mail to your friends, acquaintances and colleagues of your organization as well.

From now you can make the following bookings:

1. Congress participation
2. Participation in the festive banquet

Furthermore you can:

3. apply for a lecture
4. announce your interest in an exhibition

Find more detailed information on the congress website:

http://www.congress2010.info/
Menu item: Registration

The website will be updated regularly. You will be informed of every update by e-mail. We expect a large number of guests. So, If you make your reservations promptly, you have the best chance to take part in this event.

Best regards

Dipl. Wirt. Ing. Harald Heimbach
Dr. Rolf Sutter

Note: The website is auf Deutsch, but there are flags on the right-hand side of the page that you can use to select German, English, or French as your language of choice.

Friday, December 04, 2009

COUNTDOWN TO THE 1940 CENSUS

Yes, folks, only 850 days until the release of the 1940 census!

LINK

The link takes you to a National Archives countdown page, where you can actually sit and watch the seconds tick by until release day finally arrives!

ARE THERE ERRORS IN THE SOCIAL SECURITY DEATH INDEX?

Randy Seaver says yes, of course-- there always are, in any database THAT big-- but not nearly as many as you may have guessed:

LINK

A VERY LINCOLN CHRISTMAS

Is there an "Honest Abe" admirer on your Christmas list? You can now buy him or her gift certificates that allow free admission to the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum in Springfield, Illinois. There are discounts for tickets for children, seniors, and military. Don't know when that person might be able to go to the museum? No problem-- these gift certificates NEVER expire:

LINK

Note: Gift certificates is your first choice on the page the link above takes you to-- click on "Tix + Info" to give your recipient the gift of Lincoln!

GOOGLE’S NOT THE ONLY GAME IN TOWN

Need a search engine or meta-search engine? Google’s not your only choice, my friends:

Alta Vista: http://www.altavista.com/

Ask.com: http://www.ask.com/

Bing.com: http://www.bing.com/

Clusty: http://clusty.com/

Dogpile: http://www.dogpile.com/

Exalead: http://www.exalead.com/search/

Mamma: http://www.mamma.com/

And, just to be fair:

Google: http://www.google.com/

Thursday, December 03, 2009

ROSTER OF WISCONSIN VOLUNTEERS

Wisconsin Historical Society has put a roster of Wisconsin Civil War volunteers online:

LINK

Index image provided shows name, rank, and regiment. You can then look at the images for pages covering that regiment, which generally also provide enlistment date, muster out date or date of death, and remarks.

SERGEANT YORK

The National World War I Museum earlier this year (sorry, I just found out, too)displayed the Academy Award that Gary Cooper won for his portrayal of Sergeant Alvin York, an American hero from Tennessee. There’s still a great story about it on their website to enjoy:

LINK

THE FIRST WORLD WAR IN COLOR

The National First World War Museum in Kansas City is hosting a year-long exhibit of stunning artifacts from its extensive collection:

LINK

CHANGES AT COLORADO HISTORIC NEWSPAPERS COLLECTION

Received from Denver Public Library:

We have moved the Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection to a new server and updated software. We hope you will appreciate these improvements and we welcome your feedback.

Historic Newspapers

Newspapers are one of the most versatile and heavily used sources of information for researchers, genealogists, students and the general public. Feature stories, society news, classified and picture advertisements, school and church announcements, news from surrounding towns, editorials and cartoons, all give the reader the sense of "being there." Often the papers contain historical information that is not available in any other source.

About Colorado Historic Newspapers

The Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection (CHNC) currently includes 147 newspapers published in Colorado from 1859 to 1923. CHNC contains over 477,000 digitized pages and is a joint endeavor of the Colorado State Library, the Colorado Historical Society, and generous donors throughout the state.

LINK

James K. Jeffrey
Collection Specialist in Genealogy
Western History and Genealogy
Denver Public Library

Wednesday, December 02, 2009

ALL I WANT FOR CHRISTMAS

If you’re a good, forward-thinking genealogist, your answer should be a good digital camera. Dick Eastman lists the reasons why:

LINK

GENEALOGICAL RESOURCES IN NEW YORK

The following book (418 pages) is currently selling for just $12.00. If you or someone you know is researching ancestors who spent any time at all in NY State, it’s a real bargain. You may also want to tell your local librarian about the availability of this item:

The Definitive Key to Genealogical Resources in New York, Including New York City and Albany

Between the years 1880 and 1924, more than 12 million immigrants entered the United States through New York. The city, state and federal governments hold vast amounts of information that can unlock the mysteries of your family’s history. But where do you go in the maze of repositories, institutions, and municipal and state agencies?

Details on More than 80 Facilities

Building on Genealogical Resources in the New York Metropolitan Area, published in 1989 by the Jewish Genealogical Society, this handsome, hardcover volume puts the details of more than 80 facilities at your fingertips, including:·

32 Government Agencies

County Clerks, Courts, and Board of Elections
NYC Municipal Archives
National Archives
New York City and State vital records

60 Libraries and Archives

New York Public Library
Academic libraries and archives
Genealogical and historical societies
Jewish institutional resources
New York State Archives and Library

For each facility, you'll find:

Facility name · Address · Phone number · E-mail address ·
Hours of operation · Description of holdings · Geographic scope · Finding aids · Access · Copying facilities

What’s more, you’ll know which repositories hold genealogical and biographical materials, local historical and newspaper collections, maps and gazetteers, census records, probate records, naturalizations, name changes, vital records (birth, death, marriage), voter registrations, and more— all helping to make your visit or requests most productive.

Save Time – Quicker Research Results

Whether you’re planning a visit or requesting information by mail, knowing which repositories hold which types of information will save both your time and that of the research staff. The listing of available finding aids as well as application forms for genealogical records will enable you to get faster results. Genealogical Resources in New York takes the guesswork and complexity out of a seemingly daunting and overwhelming task.

Keep Up to Date

In recent years, new sources of genealogical information have emerged and are described for the first time in Genealogical Resources in New York in a concise, consistent format. These include:

· Ellis Island—American Family Immigration History Center
· Ellis Island—National Park Service Archives and Library
· American Jewish Historical Society
· Center for Jewish History
· American Sephardi Federation
· John Jay College of Criminal Justice Library
· Museum of Jewish Heritage
· New York Public Library—Manuscript and Archives Division
· New York Public Library—Science, Industry and Business Library
· New York State Department of State
· Old York Library

Editor's Bio

Estelle M. Guzik, editor of Genealogical Resources in New York, served as President of the Jewish Genealogical Society, Inc. from 1996 to 2001 and Vice-President from 1985 to 1990. Estelle has been a member of the JGS almost from its inception in 1977. Estelle began to research her own family history in 1970 when she realized that she did not know the names of aunts, uncles and cousins killed in the Holocaust.

Purchase your copy securely online by clicking the link below, or by calling us toll free at 1-800-247-6553:

LINK

ST. LOUIS SMALL ARMS PLANT

Several daredevils from the Underground Ozarks blog snuck into the old Army Small Arms Plant on Goodfellow Boulevard here in St. Louis and took photos of what's left in the buildings there:

LINK

The Small Arms Plant was in operation during WWII, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. Don't miss the comments-- many are from persons whose mothers / fathers worked at the Plant!

Tuesday, December 01, 2009

IRISH CASUALTIES OF WORLD WAR I

Ancestry.com recently added this subscription database, and as they point out, Irish regiments did include men of other nationalities (plus, there were also some female casualties):

LINK

LEARNING CENTER ARTICLE ARCHIVES

You can access numerous free articles on various aspects of family research at the Ancestry.com Learning Center Archives:

LINK

FAMILY TREE MAKER

If you own this commercial software, you should know that Ancestry.com provides a free online tutorial designed to help you make the most of this program:

LINK

READING FOREIGN DOCUMENTS

Did you know that Ancestry.com has free sections designed to aid persons trying to decipher documents in German, French, Italian, and Swedish?

LINK