YOU ARE VISITOR:

You are visitor:

Thanks for stopping by!

Thursday, April 30, 2009

ROOTSWEB MAILBAG

Mixed Feelings

Several years ago, on a whim, I drove to the part of the country where I knew my relatives had grown up, married and my parents died. I had exhausted Rootsweb.com and Ancestry.com. So, during my trip I stopped at tiny little towns and asked the police department where the marriage and death records would be held. At one small town, the gal at the desk asked me casually if I wanted police records, too. I thought; sure, why not, not believing for a minute that my wonderful, delightful, and pristine family would be found there. Much to my horror, I found reams of records concerning my great grandfather and his brothers and his soon to be wife's brother as well-- all listed on police blotters of 1900 or so!! In one fell swoop I found my great grandfather, an unknown cousin and a future brother-in-law all in jail for public drunkenness. I followed this group and a few more cohorts on the police blotters in two states. I'm sure their mother wasn't proud, but I was delighted!!

Rosie Fuller in Oregon

The Missing Grandpa

Although I approached my dad a number of times about his father, he never shared any information about him with me. Nearly 20 years after my dad's death, I felt a need to find details about my missing grandfather. I contacted my aunt (my dad's oldest sister) and asked about her father. She was only 13 when he apparently left home, but she readily told me what little she knew about him. Her scant information was the spark that kindled my interest in Genealogy, and it still burns today at nearly 80 years of age.

Yes, I found my grandfather, dead of course, but his story was one I knew my aunt would not want widely known. I omitted the unpleasant portion, and told her I knew where he was buried and when he died. She immediately began making plans to visit his grave, but she became ill, and died shortly thereafter. She was in her 90's.

Jack Lamphier in Florida

Thanks to RootsWeb Review for permission to reprint RWR items. Have a story, question, genealogy resource, or tip you'd like to share with RootsWeb Review readers? Send it to Editor-RWR@rootsweb.com.

SETTING THE RECORD STRAIGHT

It wasn’t the guns of Eliot Ness and his Untouchables that finally brought down Al Capone-- it was the adding machine of Treasury Department accountant Frank J. Wilson:

LINK

Note: Was Capone aware of Wilson and what he was trying to do? Since Big Al ordered “a hit” on Wilson, it’s safe to assume that he did

Note No. 2: Wilson also played a part in the apprehension of the Lindbergh baby's kidnapper…

CIVIL WAR ROUND TABLE OF THE OZARKS

A list of upcoming meetings of this Springfield, Missouri group:

LINK

Wednesday, April 29, 2009

HE DIDN”T GET HIS NICKNAME BECAUSE OF HIS REPORTS…

Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson’s official report on the activities of his brigade at First Manassas (21 July 1861) is a model of conciseness, and Jackson was very generous about giving credit to subordinates he felt were deserving:

LINK

MOTHER’S DAY IDEAS FROM YOUR FRIENDS AT ALPL

"All that I am or hope ever to be I get from my mother, God bless
her." --Abraham Lincoln.


Mother-s Day is only three weeks away, but do not fear! Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum has assembled a list of gift ideas to help you honor your mother in a positively presidential manner.

· White House china in the Museum Store

· The A. Lincoln Cookbook assembled by the Museum Volunteers, available in the Museum Store

· Tickets to “The Civil War, A Musical” on sale now - playing in July

· Seats at the intimate “My Grandmother's Apron” high tea on May 16 in the Library

· 30 to 40 of her closest friends gathering for a “Luncheon or Tea” in the
Library


· A gift membership to the Foundation, so that Mom can get in free every day for a year, get discounts in the Museum Store and to ticketed events along with other members-only perks

Visit us on Mother's Day, May 10, for a special theatrical performance of “One Destiny.”

Note: You can find other Mother’s Day ideas at the MoSGA Bookstore on our homepage: http://mosga.org/. There’s a link to it in the left-hand navigation bar on the start page.

JEWS AND THE SPANISH CIVIL WAR

This item may be of interest to anyone who fought in (or had an ancestor of any faith or nationality who fought in) the Spanish Civil War:

ABSTRACT OF LECTURE ON JEWS & THE SPANISH CIVIL WAR by Prof. Michael Alpert-- President of the Jewish Historical Society of England (JHSE) on Sunday, 26 April 2009 at the Manchester Jewish Museum, Cheetham Hill Road at 8.00 pm.

JHSE website

Professor Alpert will outline the events surrounding the outbreak and course of the Spanish Civil War of 1936-1939, and attempt to calculate the number of Jewish men and women who went to Spain to aid the Spanish Republic in its resistance to General Franco's military uprising, discussing the reasons that attracted them.

Professor Michael Alpert holds degrees from Cambridge in Modern Languages, from Reading University in History and from University College London in Jewish Studies. He is Emeritus Professor of the Modern and Contemporary History of Spain at the University of Westminster, in London.

Most of his research work has concentrated on the Spanish Civil War [which ended 70 years ago] on which he has published three books, one of them in English called A New International History of the Spanish Civil War 1936-1939 with a 2nd edition in paperback, published by Palgrave in 2004.

He has also published on Jewish History in Spain, in particular his Secret Judaism and the Spanish Inquisition, of 2008, published in paperback by Five Leaves Publishers (Nottingham). He hopes that by now his translation of a Ladino novel, Elia Karmona's The Chaste Wife, first published in Constantinople in 1925 will have appeared, also by Five Leaves Publishers in paperback form. His inaugural lecture as President of the JHSE was on Spain's aid to Jewish refugees in the Second World War. It is due to appear in the next issue of Jewish Historical Studies.

Tuesday, April 28, 2009

WHAT HAPPENED AT ANTIETAM?

What you think happened on 17 September 1862 depends to some extent on whether you read the official report of:

Confederate commander General Robert E. Lee:

LINK

or Union Army commander General George B. McClellan:

LINK

Note: McClellan’s (some would say highly characteristic) report manages to say almost nothing about the battle itself—- it is mainly a recitation of the damage he claims to have done to the rebel army!

GRANT ON SHILOH

General Ulysses S. Grant’s official report on two days of action at Pittsburg Landing, Tennessee (6-7 April 1862):

LINK

AN OPPOSING VIEW

The official report of Confederate General James Longstreet on the involvement of his corps in the Gettysburg Campaign:

LINK

CHAMBERLAIN ON LITTLE ROUND TOP

Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain’s official report on the role of the 20th Maine Regiment in the fighting on Little Round Top, 2 July 1863:

LINK

Note: We can’t always be certain to what extant an official report is the work of a Civil War general, and to what extent it is really the work of his adjutant-- but Chamberlain, a gifted educator, scholar, and linguist, would have had no trouble writing his own reports!

YOU'VE DONE IT AGAIN!

Well, you've done it again! Thanks to you, this blog has passed the 50,000 visitors mark! Thanks for your continuing interest in MoSGA Messenger-- we'll try to keep supplying you with interesting and informative news about genie events and publications, digital books and online exhibits, free software, and other news likely to be of interest to genealogists in Missouri and elsewhere!

Saturday, April 25, 2009

MEMOIRS OF THREE CIVIL WAR GREATS

The memoirs of three great Civil War Union generals (Grant, Sherman, and Sheridan) are available via Project Gutenberg:

LINK

EHISTORY PRIMARY SOURCES

Ohio State University is digitizing many primary sources and is making them available online. Items include The Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, numerous Civil War diaries, and numerous WWII oral histories:

LINK

CITIES AROUND THE WORLD

More than 6000 digital images of 450 cities worldwide. Photos were taken during the period 1942-1994:

LINK

FINDING PRIMARY SOURCES ON THE CIVIL WAR

Of interest if you’re researching a Civil War soldier, regiment, or battle:

LINK

GAMES OF THE NORTH AMERICAN INDIAN

Available as a free download from the Internet Archive:

LINK

Friday, April 24, 2009

THE LINCOLN TOMB

Official State of Illinois website of the Lincoln Tomb in Springfield, Illinois:

LINK

The Little Giant, Stephen A. Douglas, was Lincoln’s opponent in seven 1858 Illinois Senatorial debates. The Little Giant died in 1861, and is buried in Chicago, Illinois. As it happens, Douglas’s tomb also has an official State of Illinois website:

LINK

IF YOU LIVE IN ILLINOIS…

You may be able to visit the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum in Springfield, Illinois for half-price. The Museum is offering half-price admissions to residents of particular Illinois counties each month during 2009 and 2010. For example, residents of Cook County can visit for half-price during July 2009. A complete list of counties and half-price months is available here:

LINK

The same page provides details of a special offer- sign up now and receive a free password you can use to get a free Lincoln bicentennial poster for each child who accompanies you on your visit to the Library and Museum!

MISSOURI CIVIL WAR MUSEUM UPDATE

In 2002, a grassroots group of Missouri businessmen and citizens formed the "Missouri Civil War Museum, Library and Research Center", a 501(c)(3) non-profit, charitable organization. This organization is dedicated to the preservation and study of Missouri and its involvement in the American Civil War, and we are committed to telling both sides of the story in an impartial manner. Attempts were made to locate centrally in the state, but an opportunity we could not pass up arose to locate instead at Historic Jefferson Barracks near St. Louis-- the oldest active military base west of the Mississippi River (established 1826). To learn more about the history of Jefferson Barracks, go here:

http://www.mcwm.org/history_jbtimeline.html.

In 2003, we acquired the old "Officer's Post Exchange and Gymnasium Building" at Jefferson Barracks, a beautiful old Federal-style building built between 1903 and 1905, which is currently being refurbished to its original state. It is this building that will become the Missouri Civil War Museum. The group also acquired the neighboring, smaller officers’ post exchange building, which was built during World War I (1918), and which is being refurbished to its original state for use as the Missouri Civil War Library and Research Center. To date, over 2000 volumes have already been collected for the library. Membership in the organization is quickly growing and is now over 400 members. To learn more about the Missouri Civil War Museum, Library and Research Center, please go here: http://www.mcwm.org.

Big plans are underway throughout the State of Missouri and at Jefferson Barracks in anticipation of the many ceremonies and commemorations being planned for the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War in 2011 (only 2 short years away). The Civil War is still considered to be one of the most popular subjects in America, and State Tourism has confirmed that Civil War sites are still one of the biggest tourist draws. Jefferson Barracks is currently going through a great renovation / revamping phase. The whole of the approximately 2000-acre Jefferson Barracks campus will become a destination for military historians from all over the country, with museums throughout Jefferson Barracks dedicated to all our various wars. Thus, once the expected influx of domestic and international visitors to Jefferson Barracks, the Missouri Civil War Museum Library and Research Center will be in a vital position to help direct visitors interested in Civil War history to other key Civil War sites located throughout the State of Missouri, including well-known sites at Wilson's Creek (Springfield), Pilot Knob (Fort Davidson), Westport (Kansas City), Cape Girardeau, Belmont, Palmyra, Lexington, Carthage, Nevada, Jefferson City, St. Louis and other Civil War sites throughout the State of Missouri.

The Missouri Civil War Museum (MCWM) wants every county in our state accounted for and represented at the museum. We are working on creating links from our website to the Civil War link of every County in the Missouri GENWEB system. As you know, soldiers’ military records and pension records can sometimes contain a great wealth of family and genealogical information, often solving many of those "brick walls" and "dead ends". The MCWM hopes to some day have a file created for every Missouri soldier from every county, including military records and pension records, and this will include soldiers from other states who served in Missouri, or who lived in Missouri after the war, and / or who are buried in Missouri soil. If you would like to help, please send any information or pictures you have about any Civil War soldiers to the MCWM. Also, if you, or anyone you know, has Civil War artifacts or books (including Civil War books about your particular county), please consider donating or loaning them to the MCWM. All donations are tax-deductible and appropriate paperwork is supplied to the donor, and staff members will make arrangements to pick these items up from you, if you can't deliver or ship them.

Despite these tough economic times, good things are happening, and this memorial to our Show-Me State Civil War ancestors is long overdue. Here's a chance to make Missouri history and help preserve the memory of our Civil War ancestors. Please consider spreading the word about the Missouri Civil War Museum, and please consider becoming a member:

http://www.mcwm.org/imgs/Museum%20Membership%20Form.pdf

If you’ll send us the names of persons who might be interested who don't have computer access, we'll be glad to mail MCWM information to them.

Thanks for posting this on the MoSGA blog.

Sincerely,

John Maurath
Missouri Civil War Museum at Historic Jefferson Barracks
222 Worth Rd
Jefferson Barracks, MO 63125
MCWM phone number 314-845-1861

PS MCWM Chairman Mark Trout has been invited to speak at the Gasconade County Historical Society in Owensville, MO on Sunday, April 26, 2009. Please contact the MCWM or the Gasconade County Historical Society for further information.

Thursday, April 23, 2009

BETTER LATE THAN NEVER

A book removed from the Washington and Lee University Library has been returned-- 144 years after being "borrowed" by a Union soldier who was just passing through:

LINK

SLAVE INSURANCE

The laws of the early 19th century considered slaves to be property, and insurance companies allowed slaveholders to insure their property against possible financial losses due to the death or serious injury of that property. Now a number of states are requiring insurance companies to compile information databases using their records of these 19th century insurance policies:

LINK

THE EXCEL DATA TRICK

If you need to convert data from an Excel file to a Web ready HTML file, you may want to examine this fairly straightforward-looking method of doing so:

LINK

GREATER ST. LOUIS BOOK FAIR

For those who live in or will be visiting the St. Louis area this weekend--

The 2009 Greater St. Louis Book Fair at West County Center (intersection of I-270 and Manchester Road in Des Peres) opens at 4 :00 p.m. Thursday April 23rd and runs through Sunday April 26th. For complete information, please check their web site.

Note: Don't forget... they typically offer lots of genealogy-related materials like maps, atlases, dictionaries, history books, travel books, etc.

Wednesday, April 22, 2009

A TOUCH OF CLASS

YouTube, the video file-sharing website, isn’t just Star Wars fanboys and singing house pets anymore: Library of Congress now has a presence on the site:

LINK

Note: You may also wish to try searching YouTube with Genealogy as your keyword…

LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES CANADA VIRTUAL EXHIBITS

They’ve created more than 100 during an eight-year period:

LINK

NEW ZEALAND RAILWAYS

Persons with Kiwi relatives past and present may wish to browse the free online archive (1926-1940) of this colorful magazine:

LINK

SLIDEBOOM

Find and share presentations online. If your email provider makes it difficult to send or receive large files, you might also find this site useful for that reason:

LINK

Saturday, April 18, 2009

2,000 AND COUNTING...

MoSGA Messenger just marked another milestone. 2,000 posts have been added to this blog since it first appeared on 4 November 2007! Thanks to our many readers for sticking with us all this time, with a special thanks going out to our thirteen Followers (check the left-hand navigation bar on this blog if you're not familiar with the Follower concept). We hope to keep entertaining loyal fans and casual readers with interesting (and sometimes useful) posts for years to come!

SOUTH CAROLINA COLLECTION CURIOSITIES

Includes photos of various state correctional facilities that may interest you if you or an ancestor worked in (or otherwise spent time in) such a place:

LINK

MAKING OF MODERN MICHIGAN

Collaboration of more than 50 Michigan libraries that brings together 4,500 digital images of items associated with the history of the Wolverine State:

LINK

SPOTLIGHT ON WELSH GENEALOGY AT GENEALOGY.COM

From the friendly folks at Genealogical.com:

For years, researchers have lamented the difficulty of tracing their roots in Wales, particularly in view of the commonality of Welsh surnames like Jones, Evans, Roberts, or Hughes, and of the uncommonality of the Welsh language itself.

Much of the mythology and some of the genuine obstacles to Welsh research have been eliminated in recent years, thanks to the work of John and Sheila Rowlands and their colleagues at the University of Wales in Aberystwyth. In their three pioneering books, "Welsh Family History," "Second Stages in Researching Welsh Ancestry," and "The Surnames of Wales," the Rowlands have laid the framework for a modern approach to Welsh genealogy and to the study of Welsh naming patterns and practices. They have also stressed the importance of acquiring knowledge of specialized Welsh genealogical methods and sources, plus some understanding of the social, cultural, religious, and economic backgrounds of the communities in which Welsh ancestors lived.

Whether you are just beginning research in Welsh genealogy or have hit a brick wall, you can do yourself a service by following the Rowlands' suggestions. You'll also find many valuable clues in the other titles in our collection on Welsh genealogy. Scroll down and see for yourself!

WELSH FAMILY HISTORY: A Guide to Research. Second Edition.

This handbook on Welsh genealogy deals primarily with those aspects of family history research that are unique to Wales. Originally published by the Association of Family History Societies of Wales, it is considered to be the best book ever written on Welsh genealogy. It is certainly a very comprehensive handbook, with more than 20 chapters treating the essential elements of Welsh genealogy.

SECOND STAGES in Researching Welsh Ancestry.

Anyone who has had any success in researching their Welsh ancestry will know that a grasp of specialized Welsh genealogical methods and sources is only one of several factors that contributed to that success. They will know, for example, how important it is in Welsh research to have some understanding of the social, cultural, religious, and economic backgrounds of the communities in which those ancestors lived. This book attempts to broaden that understanding, especially for the period prior to 1800, when most researchers begin to experience difficulties. In addition, it aims to make readers more aware of some little-known sources and the special uses that may be applied to the information found in these sources.

THE SURNAMES OF WALES for Family Historians and Others.

This book provides the reader with detailed insight into the origins and occurrence of common Welsh surnames, together with some consideration of those surnames that are associated with particular locales, thus helping to suggest a likely place of origin within Wales.

ANNALS AND ANTIQUITIES of the Counties and County Families of Wales. In Two Volumes.

First published in 1872, with a second edition in 1875, Nicholas's ANNALS AND ANTIQUITIES is still the standard work on Welsh family history and the chief source of genealogical data on the counties and families of the principality. Unlike other books on the subject, it combines histories of the ancient counties of Wales with family lineages, integrating the two to show the social and genealogical evolution of the country.

THE CYMRY OF 76; or Welshmen and Their Descendants of the American Revolution. Second Edition.

This is one of the few printed sources on the role played by the Welsh population during the Revolutionary War. A good deal of space is devoted to notices of prominent persons of Welsh ancestry, and there is, in addition, a section on Welsh surnames.

WELSH FOUNDERS OF PENNSYLVANIA. Two Volumes in One.

Based on years of extensive research conducted in Wales, this work consists of genealogical notices of Welsh emigrants to Pennsylvania, mainly between 1682 and 1700. Alphabetically arranged, it relates to nearly 300 families and 2,000 individuals, with pedigrees and charts of the first arrivals.

Our Complete Collection of Welsh Titles:

http://www.genealogical.com/countries/Wales/Welsh.html

THE 9th BOMBARDMENT GROUP

If you (or your dad, or your grandfather) was a part of this WWII Army Air Corps unit, you’ll want to download this out-of-print history of the 9th:

LINK

Note: The 9th participated in the aerial campaign against the Japanese.

HIT THE DIRT!

And you just might make a discovery like the archaeologist who’s uncovered the exact spot near San Jacinto, Texas where hundreds of Mexican soldiers surrendered to Sam Houston in 1836:

LINK

Note: Mexican soldiers who tried to escape were shot and/or bayoneted by the Texans, who clearly remembered both the Alamo and the massacre at Goliad...

LINK

Friday, April 17, 2009

INDIANA CIVIL WAR DIARY

Those of you with ancestors in this Indiana regiment may wish to track down a copy of this periodical (hint-- try http://www.Worldcat.org/):

Indiana Magazine of History 105:1 (March 2009) has an article entitled, "The 1863 Diary of William H. Carroll, Mess No. 2, Company D, 24th Indiana Volunteers" (pp. 31-80).

Suggested by:
Michael Maben
Indiana University
Maurer School of Law
Bloomington, Indiana 47405

OZARKSWATCH

An online archive of this magazine that includes volumes I through IX (a handful of issues are not available online):

LINK

THE FRISCO MAGAZINE

Did you have an ancestor who worked for the St. Louis-San Francisco Railroad? Then you’ll want to have a look at this archive of The Frisco, a magazine for Frisco RR employees:

LINK

BONE BIOGRAPHIES

The bones of our ancestors can speak volumes about the hardships they endured during “the good old days”:

LINK

Thursday, April 16, 2009

MEDIEVAL CHIC

Fabulous photos of beautiful replicas of the attire of the well to do and the not-doing-so-well in medieval times (also includes digitized pages from illustrated medieval manuscripts):

LINK

ONLY THE SMART SURVIVE...

In this economy, business owners need all the help they can get. If you own a genealogy-related business of some sort (or any other sort of business), you'll want to know about this list of thirty books that every business owner should read:

LINK

CIVIL WAR PHOTOS

Need Civil War photos? NARA also wants to help with that:

LINK

RESEARCHING A CIVIL WAR ANCESTOR

Ready to research a Civil War Ancestor? NARA wants to help:

LINK

Wednesday, April 15, 2009

IRAQ WAR ARCHIVES

A new initiative by the Library of Congress to document the invasion of Iraq (2003) by the United States and allied forces:

LINK

TOPPING OFF YOUR SHOPPING TANK

You've ordered what genie books you need from Amazon.com, but your order doesn't quite equal $25, the magic number you need to get free shipping. What do you do?

Why, you make a beeline for Superfiller. On this site you just fill in your Amazon.com total purchase price so far, and Superfiller tells you what products you can buy that will just nudge you over that $25 magic number:

LINK

LOOK, UP IN THE SKY...

They may not have believed in UFOs, but the British government certainly investigated sightings of unidentified lying objects:

LINK

VETJOBS

If you're a veteran looking for work, if you know a veteran looking for work, or if you're an employer who would like to offer employment to veterans, then you'll really like this site:

LINK

Tuesday, April 14, 2009

WINDOWS XP GOES THE WAY OF THE DODO...

At least, Microsoft wishes it would... They're ending all support for it (except essential security fixes) on April 14, 2009:

LINK

Note: No need to toss that XP desktop or laptop in the landfill just yet-- all the XP bugs have pretty much been worked out already...

BE CAREFUL WHAT YOU POST...

Posts on blogs and social networking sites that are critical of other people (and even posts that have unkind things to say about places) can come back to haunt you and your family, as this Cal Berkeley student found out the hard way:

LINK

MIRAGE BOOKMARKS

If you love books and reading, you'll want to visit Mirage Bookmarks. The site provides images of dozens of beautiful bookmarks:

LINK

GENEALOGY AND THE RELATIVE CONNECTION

An interesting post by a guest blogger on our fascination with famous (and infamous) ancestors:

We’ve moved from large joint families to nuclear ones these days, some of which contain only a single parent. It seems that there’s little room in our lives for uncles, aunts, grandparents and others, at least on a regular basis. But with the advent of genealogy, there’s a new interest in discovering who our ancestors were, and more specifically, in finding out if we’re related to someone famous, even remotely so.

This is proved emphatically by the fact that the application We’re Related, a popular tool on the social networking site Facebook, recorded a gigantic jump in its traffic soon after their April Fools’ Day joke filled the inboxes of around 19 million people with the message that they were related to none other than Barack Obama. Never mind that the mail told them that the President had confirmed them to
be only his fourth cousin once removed: the news got hundreds of thousands of users excited (there were angry and confused ones, too), with many people getting ahead of themselves and dreaming of invitations to use the Lincoln bedroom at the White House.

What is this fixation we seem to have with connections to the rich and famous, either by blood or emotional ties? We love to be seen in the company of people who are perceived to be stars; we love to rub shoulders with those who are influential and loaded; and we are proud to throw around the names of people we’re barely connected to but who have powerful connections.

As long as this obsession is a part of human nature, people will be interested in genealogy, in discovering if they’re related to someone historically or currently famous. What they often don’t realize is that genealogy can also turn up some unwanted connections-- including relations that you don’t want to know and definitely don’t want publicized, like (for example) the fact that you are related to Adolf Hitler.

If you’re looking at genealogy as a genuine way of tracing your roots and discovering who your ancestors really were, it’s not going to be too much of a problem for you. But if you’re not prepared to make a discovery that could possibly boomerang on you, you may want to rethink your decision to explore your roots and just leave well enough alone.

This post was contributed by Courtney Phillips, who writes a blog about the cheapest online degrees. She welcomes your feedback at CourtneyPhillips80 at gmail.com

Saturday, April 11, 2009

THE IRON SERGEANT

Earlier this week, the St. Louis metro area lost a real hero. Army T/Sgt. Russell Dunham of Godfrey, Illinois won the Medal of Honor for an unbelievable display of bravery in Germany in January 1945:

LINK

DICK EASTMAN’S EASTER BUGGY

He calls it a car, but you could only squeeze me into it if you used a crowbar and a full can of WD/40:

LINK

DIGITIZE WHILE YOU STILL CAN…

Dick Eastman thinks that the recent collapse of the city archive at Cologne and the recent catastrophic earthquake in Italy should be causing many decision makers at archives large and small to start rethinking their priorities:

LINK

MAINE MEMORY NETWORK

Digital images of thousands of historical items belonging to nearly 200 Maine institutions:

LINK

HOOSIER HERITAGE

Various digitized materials relating to Indiana history and genealogy:

LINK

WESTERN HEMISPHERE TRAVEL INITIATIVE

If you don’t know what it is, and are planning to travel via land routes to Canada or Mexico this summer or fall, you NEED to visit this website:

LINK

INTERNATIONAL NUCLEAR INFORMATION SYSTEM

File it under “Not sure I like the sound of this!”

The International Nuclear Information System (INIS) is now available online for free to the general public. This means that three million bibliographic records and 850,000 full-text documents with scientific and nuclear information are now at your fingertips (and those of any angry loner countries with a yen to really “put the hurt” on somebody):

LINK

Note: I’m sure it will only-- ahem—- be used for peaceful purposes…

Friday, April 10, 2009

ANNOUNCING MOSGA'S 2009 ANNUAL CONFERENCE!

August 7-8, 2009
Capitol Plaza Hotel
Jefferson City, Missouri

Featured Speaker: Julie Miller, CGSM

Julie Miller is a Certified Genealogist with more than 30 years of genealogy experience. She is a newspaper columnist for the Broomfield Enterprise and is on the Board of Directors for the Nation al Genealogical Society, Association of Professional Genealogists, and International Society of Family History Writers and Editors. Ms. Miller is the President of the Colorado Chapter of the Association of Professional Genealogists and Past President of the Colorado Genealogical Society.

Supporting Speakers

Supporting speakers include Gene Block, Evie Bresette, Marian G. Davis, Angela McComas, Tom Pearson, and Michael L. Strauss.

Preconference Workshops

Preconference workshops ($20) include:

1. Show-Me Soldiers: Researching Missouri Civil War Militia and Volunteer Soldiers

2. Life in Captions: Writing Family Stories

Scheduled Classes

Scheduled classes include:

3. Google’s Not the Only Game in Town

4. Whatever Happened to Uncle Joe: How to Find a Living Person

5. Historical Maps

6. Records of the Great War

7. How to Find What Was Unique About Your Ancestors’ Lives

8. When Grandpa Went Off to War: U.S. Military Records

9. Photographing Andrew County Tombstones: Creating a Digitization Project

10. Forms and Analysis: Intermediate Research Techniques

11. Becoming American: Naturalization Records

12. Roosevelt’s Tree Army: Genealogical Research in the CCC

13. Getting to Know Father Abraham: Sources of Information About Our 16th President

Vendor Area

Vendor area will be open: Friday, 9:00 AM-6 PM
Saturday, 7:30 AM-3 PM

Vendor tables are $18 (full table); non-profit table rates are $12 (full table) or $6 (half-table). Need more vendor info? Email Janice Schultz at jschultz@mcpl.lib.mo.us.

Registration

Full registration is $80 ($90 for non-members). Pre-conferences are extra ($20 for members or non-members). You can also register for partial conference attendance.

Conference Hotel

You can reserve a room at the conference hotel (Capitol Plaza Hotel, 415 W. McCarty Street, Jefferson City, MO) by calling 573-635-1234. Mention you will be attending the MoSGA Conference to get the special conference room rate ($86.68 per night—- the room rate plus taxes).

More Info

Need more information, or a conference brochure? Call Janice Schultz 816-252-7228, or email her at jschultz@mcpl.lib.mo.us.

SERIAL SPOUSES (MASTER CLASS)…

The National Archives (UK) has digitized a selection of documents that show how Henry VIII managed to acquire both his vast wealth and his corresponding large collection of spouses:

LINK

DRESSED TO KILL

The Royal Armoury at the Tower of London just opened an exhibit about Henry VIII called “Dressed to Kill.” Why that name for the exhibit? Just ask a couple of his wives that question, and you’ll certainly get an earful…

LINK

PERSONAL ANCESTRAL FILE

Need software to help organize your genealogical records, but the economy has taken its toll on your pocketbook? Personal Ancestral File is a free download, as is PAF Companion (colorful ancestor and descendant charts):

LINK

WARS AIN’T CHEAP, MY FRIENDS…

So how did North and South finance the Civil War?

LINK

IF PILES ARE A PROBLEM…

If you’re reading this post, piles probably ARE a problem for you-- huge, precariously balanced piles of printer paper, that is. Printer ink isn’t cheap, either, so how can you cut the cost of printing off all that stuff from the Net? Read on, my friend:

LINK

FIRST PHISHING, NOW VISHING…

There might be a sucker born every minute, but that doesn’t mean you need to be one. You should know that some of the people who’ve been trying to sucker you with online scams are now trying to use the telephone to accomplish the same thing:

LINK

How can you protect yourself?

1. If you get a call from a company you’ve never heard of that either is demanding a payment of some sort, or telling you that you’ve won a really great prize in a contest you don’t recall entering, be extremely wary-- it’s most likely a scam. Rule of thumb: if it sounds unreal, it’s a very bad deal…
2. If you need to send money for whatever reason before the caller can send you a prize you’ve allegedly won, it’s most likely a scam. Rule of thumb: if you need to send loot, give the caller the boot…
3. If you have to do whatever the caller wants immediately, or else lose the wonderful whatever they’ve promised you, it’s most likely a scam. Rule of thumb: if they say it can’t wait, the cost to you will be great…
4. If someone calling you out of the blue demands that you immediately provide critical personal information like Social Security number or credit card or bank account numbers over the phone, it’s most likely a scam. Rule of thumb: if the caller’s in a hurry, you really need to worry…
5. If an unknown caller provides you with number to call, or a website URL to visit—- it’s most likely a scam. Look up the phone number or website address for that company or person yourself-- the phone number or web address they gave you is probably a phishing site…

Thursday, April 09, 2009

OKLAHOMA CROSSROADS

From their website:

"Oklahoma Crossroads: Documents and Images consists of selected digital collections of the Oklahoma Department of Libraries spanning more than 100 years of rich, vibrant history. These collections include documents, photographs, newspapers, reports, pamphlets, posters, maps, and an author database ranging in date from the late 1800s to present."

LINK

FLORIDA MEMORY PROJECT

Over 156,000 digitized photos illustrating all aspects of life in the Sunshine State:

LINK

ARCHIVES OF MARYLAND ONLINE

Images of more than 471,000 historical documents pertaining to the history of the Old Line State:

LINK

Wednesday, April 08, 2009

ROCKY MOUNTAIN ONLINE ARCHIVE

A cooperative effort by various Colorado, New Mexico, and Wyoming institutions to put digital images and various other audio-visual materials on the Web:

LINK

LOUISIANA DIGITAL LIBRARY

More than 84,000 digital images of items having to do with Louisiana’s people, places, history, and culture:

LINK

CONNECTICUT HISTORY ONLINE

14,000+ photos, drawings, and prints of scenes from Connecticut history:

LINK

FLIGHTGEAR

If you’ve always wanted to be able to fly your private jet to family reunions, but couldn’t afford / didn’t have time to take flying lessons, FlightGear is the next best thing to actually being airborne-- and it’s free:

LINK

Note: You get your choice of airports to fly to and from, and your choice of types of aircraft to fly: commercial jets, personal aircraft, trainers, fighters, bombers, biplanes, helicopters, gliders-- shall I go on?

Tuesday, April 07, 2009

BOOK SIGNING

On Saturday, April 18th, 2009, at 2:30 p.m., Cheryl Eichar Jett will be at Belleville (IL) Public Library for a brief talk and book signing for her new book titled Alton (a well-illustrated history of that Illinois community). Alton was published by the Arcadia Publishing Company for their Images of America series. Books will be available for sale during the program. Pre-registration is encouraged. Please call the library at 618-234-0441, ext.22 to reserve a seat!

BOOK SALE-- at both Belleville Library Locations April 23-25, 2009.
(held quarterly)

Belleville Public Library (Main)
121 East Washington St.
Belleville, IL 62220
phone: 618-234-0441 ext. 22
fax: 618-234-9474
www.bellevillepubliclibrary.org

SHE GETS AROUND, PT. II...

Seems these Wilkinson ladies like to be where the action is:

LETTERS OF ELIZA WILKINSON DURING THE INVASION AND POSSESSION OF CHARLESTON, SC BY THE BRITISH IN THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR

LINK

SHE GETS AROUND...

Mrs. Annie Margaret Green Wilkinson really got around, and she left a record of her travels that’s available for free at Google Books:

A LADY’S LIFE AND TRAVELS IN ZULULAND AND THE TRANSVAAL DURING CETEWAYO’S REIGN (1882)

LINK

REDISCOVERING NEW YORK

From their website intro:

“Here you can access links to digitized photographs, documents and online exhibits from New York's archives, historical societies, libraries and museums. The images reveal a tiny fraction of the documents, photographs, maps, and other archival records held by historical record respositories throughout New York and hint at the richness and variety of the collections that tell the stories of New York's communities and people.”

LINK

VOLUNTEER VOICES

The Tennessee Electronic Library:

LINK

MISSOURI HISTORY MUSEUM UPDATE

The three sources described below were added to the Missouri History Museum Genealogy and Local History Index in March:

http://www.mohistory.org/genealogy

1. St. Louis Volunteer Fire Department portraits, circa 1850s-1903. Most of these photographs are portraits of veterans of the St. Louis volunteer fire department. The volunteer fire companies disbanded in the late 1850s when a paid fire department was established. The bulk of these photographs appear to have been taken circa 1890s. Most of the photographs include a notation indicating the name of the fire company in which he served. Some of the photographs contain brief biographical notes on back.

2. One Hundredth Anniversary, Holy Cross Lutheran Church, 1858-1958 (St. Louis, Mo., 1958). This church history contains group photographs of church groups (such as the Board of Trustees, tellers, and bookkeepers), which include current members (i.e., 1958) and past members. The history also includes portraits of church pastors, usually accompanied by a biographical sketch; portraits of the current teaching staff; brief notes about church members; and a few images of past church buildings.

3. Old and New St. Louis: A Concise History of the Metropolis of the
West and Southwest, with a Review of Its Present Greatness and Immediate
Prospects
// by James Cox (St. Louis: Central Biographical Pub. Co.,
1894). This book contains biographical sketches of prominent St. Louisans, many of which are accompanied by their portrait. These sketches often include the man’s exact place and date of birth, parents’ names (including the mother’s maiden name), wife’s maiden name, and children’s names. Please note that the index entries refer not only to the name of the man who is profiled, but also the names of those within each biographical sketch (i.e., wife’s name, children's names, parents’ names, names of business associates).

Also, please take a look at our new Genealogy Links page:
http://www.mohistory.org/lrc/family-history/genealogy-links


Dennis Northcott
Associate Archivist for Reference
Missouri History Museum

Monday, April 06, 2009

HISTORY AND GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY FAIR

The National Archives Central Plains Region Branch invites the public to its dedication ceremony on Saturday, 23 May 2009, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. They’re calling it their “History and Genealogical Society Fair,” and they’re inviting genealogical and historical societies to man display tables at this function. Space is limited, so societies are limited to one table only on a first-come, first-served basis. If interested, reserve your table immediately by calling Reed Whitaker at (816) 268-8071.

History and Genealogical Society Fair Schedule
8 a.m. -- 9 a.m. -- Set-up
10 a.m.-- 4 p.m. -- Fair
4 p.m.-- 5 p.m.-- Clean-up

National Archives Central Plains Region Branch, 400 W. Pershing Road, Kansas City, MO 64108 (new address as of 16 March 2009).

Note: They’re celebrating their 75th Anniversary this year, and there will be a big exhibit of documents, maps, and photos at the Archives that runs from 22 May 2009- 23 January 2010. There will also be a Kansas-Nebraska Act Exhibit that focuses on the act’s impact on the region, its role in the “Bleeding Kansas” conflict, and how it affected the national debate on slavery and the spread of slavery into the territories. That exhibit runs from 30 May 2009- 31 December 2009.

DROP, STOP, AND DANGLE…

The Stalker 29:1 (2009) includes an article about a Montana cowboy who was hanged as a train robber in 1889. The cowboy had done time in the territorial prison for horse thievery prior to his death. As it happens, the only photo of this man in the possession of the family is a shot of him standing on the gallows awaiting his appointment with eternity! The article notes that a biographical sketch of the cowboy written by a relative managed to put a positive spin on his life and death:

“Remus Reid was a famous cowboy in the Montana Territory. His business empire grew to include acquisition of valuable equestrian assets and intimate dealings with the Montana railroad. Beginning in 1883, he devoted several years of his life to government service, finally taking leave to resume his dealings with the railroad. In 1887, he was a key player in a vital investigation run by the renowned Pinkerton Detective Agency. In 1889, Remus passed away during an important civic function held in his honor when the platform upon which he was standing collapsed.”

Note: Periodicals mentioned in posts on this blog are part of the collection of the Midwest Genealogy Center in Independence, Missouri.

CARONDELET ARCHITECTURE EXHIBIT

The Carondelet Historical Society is sponsoring an exhibit on the architecture of Carondelet. The exhibit, which is scheduled to run from 1 May 2009- 1 September 2009, will include paintings, photographs, and newspaper depictions of Carondelet buildings, boats, and trains. The extensive exhibit will include displays on all three floors of the Historic Center.

Hours: Tues, Weds, Fri- 9:30 a.m. – 3 p.m; Sat – 10:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. You can also call 314-481-6303 to schedule a tour.

Carondelet Historical Society, 6303 Michigan Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63111

ASSOCIATE EDITOR FOR MOSGA JOURNAL

Seeking Associate Editor for the MoSGA Journal. Associate Editor will be familiarized with the duties of the Journal Editor, and will assume that position no later than 1 January 2011. Prefer someone with previous writing / editing experience; also prefer someone with a proven track record for meeting deadlines. Need not be a member of MoSGA at present, but must be willing to join upon appointment as Associate Editor. Prefer someone who will be able to attend quarterly Board meetings in Columbia, Missouri on a fairly regular basis. This is a volunteer position with reimbursement for expenses. If interested, please contact Associate Journal Editor Search Committee Chair Tom Pearson at 314-389-6231 or 89ilguy@gmail.com.

Saturday, April 04, 2009

GEN DISASTERS

“Over 12,000 Disaster Articles Added. Browse by type of Disaster, State or Year.
New - Canada Disasters!”

LINK

What types of disasters are covered? I certainly noticed a lot of private plane crashes, and numerous train collisions, but natural disasters also receive coverage. Here’s a link to a story on the September 1927 St. Louis tornado that includes a number of photos of the devastation caused by that twister:

LINK

VIGILANTES OF MONTANA

The subtitle says it all: Secret Trials & Midnight Hangings, 1863-1864:

LINK

OHIO MEMORY

Over 75,000 images from the collections of more than 300 Ohio institutions:

LINK

TEXAS TIDES

Documentation of the impacts of five different cultures (African, Anglo, Mexican, Spanish, and Native) on the Lone Star State-- starting well before statehood:

LINK

SCHMIDT STING PAIN INDEX

Have you ever been stung / bitten by an insect, or have ancestors who were? How does a bite from a fire ant compare to a bite from a bullet ant? Justin O. Schmidt found out the hard way- he’s been stung by more than 150 different kinds of insects on six continents:

LINK

Note: He rates insect stings on a scale from 1 to 4-- one is annoying but easily tolerated, while four is “please kill me now” off-the-charts agony.

MISSOURI HISTORY MUSEUM PHOTOSTREAM ON FLICKR

Photos of MHM exhibits and St. Louis historic street scenes:

LINK

Thursday, April 02, 2009

DESKTOP PUBLISHING

Need desktop publishing software? One of these commercial packages may be just the ticket:

LINK

Or, if your nest egg just did a half gainer off the AIG Building, maybe you’d prefer this free desktop publishing program:

LINK

CLUELESS ABOUT CLOUD COMPUTING

If you are clueless about cloud computing, read Dick Eastman’s article about it and soak up some knowledge:

LINK

U.S. GOVERNMENT BOOKSTORE’S SWEET SIXTEEN

The U.S. Government Bookstore has put together a “sweet sixteen” list of some of its most popular publications:

LIST

Wednesday, April 01, 2009

NORTON INTERNET SECURITY IS SWEET AGAIN

If you’re in the market for Internet security software for your computer, it looks like Norton Internet Security Suite is a frontrunner again after a year or two of not-so-glowing reviews:

LINK

Or, if your software budget is limited, maybe you can find something for free here:

LINK

STATE RESOURCE GUIDES

Did you know that Library of Congress offers a series of State Resource Guide finding aids on its website? They’re just getting started, so many states (Missouri, for instance) have not been prepared yet, but the Illinois State Resource Guide is available:

“The digital collections of the Library of Congress contain a wide variety of material associated with Illinois, including manuscripts, broadsides, government documents, books, and maps. This guide compiles links to digital materials related to Illinois that are available throughout the Library of Congress Web site. In addition, it provides links to external Web sites focusing on Illinois and a bibliography containing selections for both general and younger readers.”

LINK

HOW TO REVITALIZE YOUR GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY

Tips that may work for your society:

LINK

FLORIDA PHOTOS AT FLICKR.COM

State Archives of Florida photostream at Flickr.com:

LINK