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Tuesday, March 31, 2009

IF YOU CAN’T AFFORD TO LOSE IT, WRITE IT ON A ROCK

Interesting article that points out the curious fact that, when it comes to data format stability and longevity, older is definitely better:

LINK

GREENE COUNTY TOURING GUIDE

If you’ve got ancestors in Greene County, Missouri, you may be interested in these driving guides to historic sites in Greene County:

LINK

MIDWEST GENEALOGY CENTER TOUR

If you live in (or near) Greene County, and have been wishing you had some easy way to get to the Midwest Genealogy Center in Independence, Missouri, this may be good news, indeed:

LINK

GOOGLE GETS BUSY…

And finishes scanning nearly all the public domain items in all of Oxford University’s libraries:

LINK

ANOTHER GREAT NEWSPAPER FILES FOR CHAPTER 11 PROTECTION…

This time it’s the Chicago Sun-Times (and the news group it’s part of):

LINK

Saturday, March 28, 2009

ST. CLAIR COUNTY (IL) GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY NEWS

If you live in the St. Louis metro area, you may wish to attend one of these talks:

The St. Clair County Genealogical Society presents the following lectures, which are open to the public and summarized in its quarterly journal.

April 2, 2009
Church Records (with emphasis on the Roman Catholic Church).

Ms. Jackie (Clancy) Grah will discuss the value of Roman Catholic church records for discovering vital statistics on your ancestral research. Access to these sacramental parish registers is available through the Internet and record repositories.

May 7, 2009
The Illinois State Archives

Housed in an unassuming building in Springfield, Illinois, the Archives holds records of the State. Military muster rolls, account books that track payments for the earliest land sales within State borders, licenses for barbers and physicians, and death certificates 1916 through 1947, are but a few of the interesting records held there.

Tom Pearson is a frequent speaker at libraries and for our genealogical society. Known for his expertise in all things military, Mr. Pearson is a Reference Librarian at St. Louis Public Library, and author of Illinois Central: a Guide to Genealogical Research in Springfield, Illinois.

June 4, 2009
An Introduction to the National Archives and Its Treasures

Visit the National Archives during this virtual tour. We will clear some pathways through the amazing wealth of records at this Pennsylvania Avenue institution, learn some "lingo," and view documents that may apply to your own family's research.

Our speaker, Diane Walsh, CG(SM), has visited the Archives in Washington, D.C. on several occasions, each time taking away new insights into the massive and varied records stored there. She is the author of St. Clair County, Illinois Research and Resources: A Genealogist's Guide and editor of the local society quarterly journal.

Meetings are held the first Thursday of each month. Time: 7:30 p.m.
Location: St. Luke Parish Hall, North Church and East "C" Sts., Belleville, Illinois. (Guests always welcome.)

SCCGS Website: http://www.stclair-ilgs.org/stchome.htm

NEWS FROM THE ONTARIO GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY

Two Important Announcements from the Toronto Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society:

Ontario Genealogical Society Conference 2010
Essentials, Innovations and Delights
Call for Papers
Deadline: 1 May 2009

The Ontario Genealogical Society’s Toronto Branch will host the Society’s annual conference on 14-16 May 2010. OGS, founded in 1961, is a not-for-profit organization with more than 4,500 members. The Conference theme will be: “Essentials, Innovations and Delights”.

In keeping with this theme, the Conference aims to present information that is both relentlessly practical and inspiring. We will be especially interested in lectures that deal with (a) practical essentials, (b) recent innovations, or (c) one-of-a-kind case histories.

You are invited to submit proposals for lectures on any aspect of genealogical or social history research in Canada and/or countries of origin.

In addition we are planning half-day in-depth programs on Italian and Dutch ancestry. We encourage proposals for lectures that could form part or whole of these streams.

Most sessions will be one hour long. Topics for longer workshops will also be considered.

For more details about Conference 2010 and how to request further information and submit your proposals, please visit http://www.ogs.on.ca/conference2010/
Note: Deadline for proposals is 1 May 2009


14th Genealogy "Summer Camp"
Toronto, 7-12 June 2009
Ontario Genealogical Society, Toronto Branch
Co-ordinator: Jane MacNamara

Now in its 14th year, Genealogy Summer Camp is an innovative week-long program that brings both out-of-town and local researchers with Ontario roots to the wonderful cluster of archives and libraries in Toronto. Each day, participants will travel as a group to a different repository, including the Archives of Ontario in its new location at York University, where they will receive tutorials on available records and spend time doing hands-on research under the guidance of local experts. The fee for 2009 is $200. This covers approximately 7 hours of tours and tutorials, 25 hours of instructor-guided personal research, and all worksheets and handouts. Both out-of-town researchers and local “day campers” are welcome.

For complete details, including lists of venues, resources and tutorials, accommodation information and an application form, please visit www.torontofamilyhistory.org/summer.html, call 416-733-2608 (voice mail) or e-mail info@torontofamilyhistory.org.

Applications should be submitted by 1 May 2009, although earlier contact is appreciated.

Gwyneth Pearce
Ontario Genealogical Society - Toronto Branch

TRI-COUNTY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY NEWSLETTER

Hi:

The Tri-Co newsletter has been posted at www.rootsweb.com/~motcogs/.

The April meeting will be another good one -- hope you will be there!

Regards,
Nancy Thompson
Tri-County Genealogical Society
218 West Walnut St, Nevada, MO 64772

email: tricountygenealogy@centurytel.net

website: http://www.rootsweb.com/~motcogs/

TOPEKA GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY ANNUAL CONFERENCE

25 April 2009

Topeka, KS - The Topeka Genealogical Society Annual Conference, featuring speaker John Philip Colletta, will be held at the Kansas State Historical Society, 6425 SW Sixth Street, Topeka, Kansas. For more details and downloadable registration form (as they become available), see our website: www.tgstopeka.org.

Friday, March 27, 2009

GETTING THE MOST OUT OF YOUR LIBRARY

Intended for college students, but some good tips for other library users-- genealogists, for example:

LINK

BOTANY FOR LADIES

Full-text of a book on natural science for the fair sex by Mrs. Jane Loudon (first published in 1842):

LINK

Mrs. Loudon covered zoology in her other book, Mrs. Loudon’s Entertaining Naturalist: Being Popular Tales, Descriptors, and Anecdotes of More Than Five Hundred Animals (1867):

LINK

FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT UPDATE

New guidelines put forward by the Attorney General:

LINK

BRITISH LIBRARY ARCHIVAL SOUND RECORDINGS

Access to some recordings is restricted, but anyone can play more than 1,500 recordings of UK dialects, British wildlife, and recordings of Holocaust survivors:

LINK

Thursday, March 26, 2009

FAMILY TREE MAGAZINE

May 2009 Table of Contents:

LINK

I WAS SUPPOSED TO DO WHAT NOW?

If you need a little reminder every so often, there are online reminder services (many free) waiting in the wings to help shore up your memory:

LINK

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN NEWSPAPERS CLOSE THEIR DOORS?

It depends-- are we talking big city, or small town?

LINK

2009 LIBRARIANS’ DAY AT FGS CONFERENCE

Are you a librarian working with family historians and genealogy reference areas? The 2009 Federation of Genealogical Societies Conference, hosted by the Arkansas Genealogical Society, invites you to a special day designed for librarians. The FGS Librarians’ Day, graciously sponsored by ProQuest, will be held on 2 September 2009 (Wednesday).

The location is the impressive and recently opened Arkansas Studies Institute, Central Arkansas Library System, located at 401 President Clinton Avenue, Little Rock, Arkansas. This is an all day event for librarians to network with each other as well as hear from gifted speakers. The day starts at 9:00 AM and runs to about 4:00 PM. The library has extended its hours and will close at 8:00 PM so there will be plenty of time to do research.

For more up to date information about the Butler Center for Arkansas Studies that is now located in the Arkansas Studies Institute Building, please check out their blog at http://butlercenter.blogspot.com.

Librarians' Day Agenda

8:45 AM – Welcome

9:00 AM – 10:00 AM
Building Bridges – Connecting Libraries, Archives and Genealogist by Russell L. Baker, Archival Manager, Arkansas History Commission and State Archives.

10:15 AM – 11:15 AM
American Memory (The Library of Congress) by Karen Russ, MLS, Government Documents Librarian/Assistant Professor at Ottenheimer Library, Univ. of Arkansas at Little Rock

11:30 AM – 12:45 PM
Lunch sponsored by ProQuest – presentation by William Forsyth, PMP, Director of Product Management and Ms. Lanell James, MSI, Manager, Genealogy

1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Quick Overview of African American Resources by Lisa Parry Arnold, Content Manager for TGN

2:15 PM – 3:15 PM
Share in the Arkansas Experience – The Arkansas Studies Institute by David Stricklin, Ph.D., Director of the Arkansas Studies Institute

3:15 PM
Tour Arkansas Studies Institute

There is limited seating (90). Please register at librariansday@fgs.org. Please include, name, address, email, and library affiliation. The cost is FREE and includes lunch courtesy of ProQuest! A RSVP is required to attend the day. FGS thanks ProQuest and the Arkansas Studies Institute for their important participation in this day.

FGS invites librarians to attend the rest of the conference, too. For program details and registration info visit www.fgsconference.org. That site also has details should your library want to be a part of the exciting Exhibit Hall. For conference updates, special announcements, additional lecture and speaker information visit www.fgsconferenceblog.org.

Wednesday, March 25, 2009

READ TO ME, PART II…

Dick Eastman has the scoop on a scanner that doesn't just scan-- it will read what it scans to you:

LINK

Note: It costs $600, which in this economy may prove a problem for some of us…

LDS SECRET WEAPON: PRISON INMATES

Turns out part of their volunteer labor force helping to do record “extractions” is an enthusiastic group of Utah state prison inmates:

LINK

Note: Seems pretty obvious to me that the extraction dearest to the heart of one of these guys is himself from prison!

E-LATED ABOUT E-BOOKS

Looking to buy an ebook, but wish you knew if you were paying a good price? Let ebookprice do the price shopping for you:

LINK

WARS ‘R US

Did you know that Library of Congress has web guides pertaining to many of America’s military conflicts?

For instance, the American Revolution: http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/bib/revolution/home.html

Or, the War of 1812: http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/bib/1812/

Or the Mexican-American War: http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/bib/mexicanwar/

Or, the Spanish-American War: http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/bib/spanishwar/

What do these web guides do? Here’s the explanatory info for the American Revolution web guide:

“The digital collections of the Library of Congress contain a wide variety of material associated with the American Revolution, including manuscripts, broadsides, government documents, books, and maps. This guide compiles links to digital materials related to the American Revolution that are available throughout the Library of Congress Web site. In addition, it provides links to external Web sites focusing on the American Revolution and a bibliography containing selections for both general and younger readers.”

Saturday, March 21, 2009

INTERNET EXPLORER 8

Want to step up to the latest version of IE-- for free? Go here:

LINK

Or, consider stepping up to a different browser entirely:

Avant (PC): http://www.avantbrowser.com/

Opera (PC): http://www.opera.com/download/

Mozilla Firefox (PC): http://www.mozilla.com/en-US/firefox/

Safari (Mac or PC): http://www.apple.com/safari/download/

BEST WINDOWS FREEWARE OF 2008

Lifehacker lists the best:

LINK

Note: For instance, Free PDF to WORD Converter:

LINK

MISSOURI MISCELLANY

This page includes scans of book covers and photos of various objects and artifacts that relate in some way to Missouri history or folklore. There are also scans of some songbook covers, and lyrics for some Missouri-related songs are provided:

LINK

One of the scans shows Give 'Em Hell Harry with a Missouri mule!

GOOGLE IMAGE SEARCH

I notice the Life Magazine Photo Archives icons have disappeared from Google Image Search-- but the Life Magazine photos are still there. To search them, instead of searching like this:

Marilyn Monroe

Add source:life to your search string:

Marilyn Monroe source:life

Friday, March 20, 2009

DEAR MYRTLE SEES ALL…

And she thinks all genealogy periodicals sometime in the next five years-- ten, tops-- will go completely digital:

LINK

2010 U.S. BUDGET DOCUMENTS

Obviously not for the faint-of-heart:

LINK

READ ME A STORY…

Fastest growing category in the I-Tunes apps store- books!

LINK

PICNIK

Photo-editing online- for free:

LINK

Note: Basic photo-editing is free—adding bells and whistles (that you may not need anyway) will cost you.

Thursday, March 19, 2009

NAZI PROPAGANDA

How did the Nazis control the news and mold public opinion? Propaganda, that’s how-- and many Nazi propagandists were very good at what they did:

LINK

JEWISH WOMEN: A COMPREHENSIVE HISTORICAL ENCYCLOPEDIA

It’s available full-text online-- and it’s free, thanks to the Jewish Women’s Archive:

LINK

GOODBYE TO GITMO

The Justice Department has issued a memorandum that says it is preparing a new standard for holding terrorists and fellow travelers in detention facilities like the one at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba that will place limits on the sweeping powers previously claimed by the Bush Administration. The broad designation of “enemy combatant” will generally no longer be an option:

LINK

1897-1920 MICHIGAN DEATHS ONLINE!

Introducing the Michigan Death Records Collection

By Kris Rzepczynski, Library of Michigan | March 16, 2009

Welcome to Seeking Michigan! As a partner in the site, The Library of Michigan is excited to make these Michigan death certificates for the years 1897 to 1920 freely available online. The years 1915 to 1920 are particularly significant, as a readily available statewide index did not exist previously.

There are terrific ancestral discoveries just waiting to be made in this statewide collection. Take Guy Robinson, for example. His death certificate is exceptionally detailed, even more so than usual. Guy died 17 May 1914 in Delta Township, Eaton County. In addition to both his parents’ names (his mother’s maiden name, too), the certificate identifies his mother’s specific county of birth – Dodge County, Wisc. Guy’s father’s birthplace is even more specific – Woodland Township, Barry County, Mich., as is his own – Oneida Township, Eaton County, Mich. Guy’s burial was at Union Cemetery in Eaton County, perhaps at a family plot there. The certificate’s informant was Guy’s father, Loell Robinson, giving a certain validity to the information. If this were your “Guy,” you’d be ecstatic.

Continue reading:
http://seekingmichigan.org/look/2009/03/16/million-record-march

Warning on the site: The flood of visitors searching Seeking Michigan has caused the site's response time to drag. This challenge illustrates how popular we knew the information would be. We encourage researchers to check back periodically and continue to try to explore the site. We are working on the problem and hope to have things running smoothly in the near future.

ANCESTRY.COM UPDATES

Post-1930 Family History Information

We’re excited to tell you about two collections that provide post-1930 family history information on a national scale.

The first is an update to our 1940 census substitute. Last week Ancestry.com launched more than 2,000 U.S. City Directories, representing more than 45 states, for 1940 and surrounding years. Forerunners of phone books, city directories typically list head of household with address and occupation. Look for additional directories to be launched in the coming months.

Second -- in the next few weeks, we’ll be launching more than 525 million names, dating from 1950 to 1990, in U.S. Public Records Index database. See below for more details on this update.


New Ancestry.com Content

Last week we posted the improved 1880 U.S. Federal Census. This update includes new, higher-quality images that, in many cases, fix completely illegible images.

The improved 1880 census is the second of the U.S. censuses we will be updating, through partnership with FamilySearch, over the coming months with improved images and indexes. (The 1900 census was the first, released 2008.) The updated 1880 index was not part of this release, but will be coming in the next few months.

Other content additions and updates include:
· U.S. Circuit Court Criminal Case Files, 1790-1871
· United States Obituary Collection - Updated
· Irish Canadian Emigration Records, 1823-1849

You can view the full list of recently added databases, extending back a couple of months, at http://www.ancestry.com/search/rectype/recent.aspx.

U.S. Public Records Index Update

In the next few weeks, Ancestry.com will be adding to the U.S. Public Records Index (USPRI) database more than 525 million names, addresses, ages, and possible family relationships of people who lived in the United States between roughly 1950 and 1990.

This information, which will be available online for the first time, is an excellent resource in discovering information about ancestors who lived after 1930 – often a challenging area of research because many records are not yet publicly available.

The soon-to-be-added records will replace the existing USPRI records, which contains recently compiled public records dating back to about 2000 and are primarily used for searching living people. As part of this change, you might notice that some search result pages on Ancestry.com include basic search results for records on MyLife.com. We have partnered with MyLife.com, a leading subscription-based people search service. We believe that MyLife.com, which includes current public information and more than 700 million profiles of living people, is better equipped to offer these services than we are.

While we will no longer serve post-2000 USPRI records on Ancestry.com, members who have already saved records from the database to an online tree will retain free access to those records.

Website and Product Information Messages—A New Way to Connect with the Ancestry.com Community

Last week we launched a new site feature – Messages – to help members connect with each other. Found in the upper right corner of almost every page on Ancestry.com, the Messages link is your portal to sending and receiving messages to and from other Ancestry.com members. Ancestry.com product manager David Graham discusses this new feature here.

Free Webinars

March 19 – Conquering the Challenge of Reading Handwritten Document; Part 1 – 6 pm ET; Part 2 – 8 pm ET

We all encounter source documents that can be difficult to read if the handwriting isn't "clear." In addition, contributors to the World Archives Project take on the task of reading hand-written documents and keying the information that will become an index that researchers will use. Whether you are a beginning researcher, a more seasoned researcher, or a keyer we invite you to join us for an hour of learning and sharing tips that will improve your skills in deciphering handwritten documents. You can register for this webinar here.

Archives Webinar – Family Tree Maker 2009 New Features Demo

Join the Family Tree Maker 2009 team for a tour of the new features just added to Family Tree Maker 2009. Learn tips and tricks to get the most out of the new features. Program developers from the Family Tree Maker team will answer some of your questions. You can view this archived webinar here.

Note: To register for a webinar or view an archived webinar, click on the Learning Center tab on the Ancestry.com home page. Then Keep Learning and, finally, webinars.

http://learn.ancestry.com/LearnMore/Webinars.aspx

Highlights from the Ancestry.com Blog

The Ancestry.com blog is a great place for site updates and info, as well as tutorials. Here’s what Ancestry.com employees have been talking about:

http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/

* Ancestry.com DNA haplogroup designations, posted by Wendy Jessen, marketing manager for Ancestry.com DNA
* Changing text size on search results, posted by Anne Mitchell, Product Manager for Search
* Creating family tree posters from your online tree, posted by Stefanie Condie, brand manager for MyCanvas

I send this email highlighting new Ancestry.com content, announcements and features on a regular basis. If you don’t want to receive this email, please let me know. I’d love your feedback on helpful information that I could add to this update. Please feel free to email me with your suggestions, and I’ll add them where possible.

As always, please let me know if I can answer any questions!

Best,

Anastasia Tyler

Wednesday, March 18, 2009

OGS FALL CONFERENCE 2009

Ozarks Genealogical Society conference set for Sept. 25-26

The 29th Ozarks Genealogical Society’s fall conference will be held September 25-26, 2009, at University Plaza.

The speaker for this year’s conference is Thomas W. Jones, Ph.D., CG, CGL, FASG. Dr. Jones is joint editor of the National Genealogical Society Quarterly, former trustee and a past president of the Board for Certification of Genealogists, board member of the Association of Professional Genealogists, and recipient of its 2004 Grahame T. Smallwood Jr. Award of Merit.

Recently retired from a career in higher education, Dr. Jones works full time as a genealogical researcher, writer, editor, and educator. His research has encompassed records of every state east of the Mississippi, as well as Iowa, Missouri, Texas, France, Germany, Italy, and Ireland. He specializes, however, in Georgia and Virginia and is most interested in solving “brick-wall” genealogical problems. He writes and speaks frequently on genealogical methods with broad application across geographic areas, time periods, and levels of expertise. He is known for meaty lectures that benefit genealogists of all levels of experience.

On January 16, 2009, Dr. Jones was honored as a Fellow of the Utah Genealogical Association, an award given in recognition of living individuals whose distinguished contributions and ongoing commitment to the field of genealogy are of national or international scope.

Look for additional conference details on the OGS Web site at http://ozarksgs.org/.

For questions, e-mail: conference@ozarksgs.org.

NACOGDOCHES CEMETERY

Matching grants totaling $500,000 will be used to fund a cemetery interpretation project in this Texas community. The result should be able to serve as a cemetery interpretation model for other cities interested in cemetery interpretation / preservation:

LINK

THE LAST OF THE ROMANOVS

DNA testing has confirmed that all the Romanov children (and several household servants) died with the Czar and Czarina in a hail of Bolshevik bullets:

LINK

NATIONAL ARCHIVES IS 75 YEARS YOUNG…

And they’ve set up a celebratory website that includes photos, wallpapers, and a screensaver:

LINK

WYOMING NEWSPAPER PROJECT

Discover the stories that formed Wyoming with the Wyoming Newspaper Project

The Wyoming State Library is making available to Web researchers full-text access to the first set of historical Wyoming newspapers. This project involves digitizing a 70-year comprehensive statewide collection of Wyoming newspapers from 1849 to 1922.

This first collection release will cover selected years, ranging from 1867 to 1922, of over 200 titles such as The Cheyenne Daily Leader, The Laramie Sentinel (weekly and daily), The Natrona County Tribune, The South Pass News, The Torrington Telegram and The Inter-Mountain Globe. These issues are now available at www.wyonewspapers.org. Researchers can access the individual issues through keyword searching or browsing through the collection by title, year, city or county.

Funding for the project was made possible by the Wyoming Legislature, the support of Governor Dave Freudenthal, and the Library Services and Technology Act federal program. All of the metadata was created by residents of Wyoming.

Dawn Rohan
Intellectual Property Librarian
Wyoming State Library
Cheyenne, WY 82002
drohan@state.wy.us
307-777-7281

Email to and from me, in connection with the transaction of public business, is subject to the Wyoming Public Records Act and may be disclosed to third parties.

Tuesday, March 17, 2009

HEY THERE, IT’S A BIG BLACK BEAR…

Apparently these critters (with whom our Show-Me State ancestors were familiar) are making a comeback in Missouri:

LINK

WILDER SHORES

Turns out some ladies of the 17th and 18th centuries had lust in their hearts-- wanderlust, that is:

LINK

A SHORT HISTORY OF SCOTLAND

Book by Andrew Lang available full-text at Project Gutenberg:

LINK

And a long list of other Project Gutenberg titles by Lang (1844-1912):

LINK

THIS ARCHAEOLOGIST IS ALL WET…

Or will be shortly- James Spirek is going to map the floor of Charleston (SC) Harbor, because it was the scene of many naval actions during the Civil War:

LINK

Saturday, March 14, 2009

MISSOURI HISTORY MUSEUM GENEALOGY & LOCAL HISTORY INDEX

Recently the Missouri History Museum launched the Genealogy and Local History Index which includes references to hundreds of thousands of our St. Louis ancestors. In this index, you can search by personal name, business/corporate name, or street address. (The latter search option is designed primarily for those researching the history of their home and its former residents.)

You can also sign up for our email list to receive monthly announcements of new sources that are added to the index. To do so, simply send an email to dpn@mohistory.org with the word "subscribe" in the subject field and your first and last name in the body of the email.

Among the more than 225 sources in the Genealogy and Local History Index are the following: more than 5,000 Civil War-era loyalty oaths signed by St. Louisans; many high school and other school yearbooks from the first half of the 20th century; local Who's Who publications; company employee magazines; a few mid-19th-century, nonfederal St. Louis-area censuses; questionnaires filled out by World War I servicemen; records and publications relating to Civil War veterans; and much more.

Please note that the Genealogy and Local History Index is an INDEX to selected books, publications, documents, and photographs in the holdings of the Missouri History Museum Library and Research Center. You cannot view a digital image of the actual source online. If you find references in the index that interest you, you can request a photocopy online. (Copies will be mailed in 1-2 business days.)

Please also visit our new Family History--Get Started page to learn about additional catalogs, guides, and indexes.

Read more about the Genealogy and Local History Index in the current edition of Voices, the online magazine of the Missouri History Museum:

http://www.mhmvoices.org/2008FallDept2.php

SAM GRANT WENT A'COURTIN’...

Fascinating article about the courtship and marriage of Ulysses S. Grant and Julia Dent- by Julia’s sister, Emma Dent Casey:

LINK

JOHN BROWN’S RAID

Osawatomie Brown’s famous raid on Harper’s Ferry took place 150 years ago, and four counties in four states (Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia) are observing the anniversary:

LINK

And read all about Captain Brown in this Wikipedia article:

LINK

SUDDENLY SCOTTISH

Alex Haley suspected Scottish roots, and turns out he was right. Now it looks like President Obama also has Scottish roots-- and has a bit of the blarney flowing in his veins as well:

LINK

RED CROSS WWI CASUALTIES ARCHIVE “DISCOVERED”

Records unearthed in the basement of the Geneva office of the International Red Cross contain information on 20 million soldiers from 30 countries who were killed, wounded, or taken prisoner during WWI. The Red Cross has set aside monies to digitize these records, and hopes to have them online by 2014, 100th anniversary of the start of WWI:

LINK

Note: It seems to me that an inventory of basements of many large organizations is in order. Who knows what genealogical treasures have been "buried" for 50 or more years?

Friday, March 13, 2009

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH OBITS INDEX UPDATE

Keith Zimmer at St. Louis Public Library wants you to know that he has managed to index the following years of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch newspaper for obits, death notices, and burial permits:

"1880-1930, 1942-1945, 1960-1963, 1992-2008. Currently working on May 1964 and, of course, the latest for 2009."

Some of these years do not as yet appear on the St. Louis Public Library website, but you can email him directly and he will check those years for you (he will need a postal address to send copies to).

St. Louis Obituaries Search: http://www.deathindexes.com/missouri/obituaries.html

NOTE: The St. Louis Post-Dispatch Obits Index has been a one-man project from the beginning. If you've found relatives you might have missed otherwise because of the index, why not email him to say thanks?

TRI-COUNTY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY NEWS

Hi:

The Tri-County Genealogical Society February 2009 Newsletter is now available on our website at www.rootsweb.com/~motcogs/

Members: The Topeka, Kansas, Genealogical Society is asking to trade publications with us -- please look over the publications that they have available for sale/trade at http://tgstopeka.org/publications.html and email your comments to our president, Kathe, at katrader@centurytel.net so it can be decided at our March 14 meeting. We have sufficient copies of our 8 marriage indexes (value of $96) if there are Topeka Gen. Soc. resources which are applicable to our region and would be of benefit to have in our collections.

Regards,
Nancy Thompson
Tri-County Genealogical Society
218 West Walnut St, Nevada, MO 64772

email: tricountygenealogy@centurytel.net
website: http://www.rootsweb.com/~motcogs/

P.S. I apologize for the lateness and brevity of this newsletter -- for the past 2 weeks I've been the daily caregiver for my 90-yr-old mother-in-law and have taken her to the ER, the dentist, two doctor appointments and then recently she was admitted to the Nevada Hospital and we just got back home. If I've forgotten something that was supposed to be in this newsletter...we'll get it in next month!

FREE TAX HELP FOR THE U.S. MILITARY

If you are in the U.S. military, or know someone who is, this news about free tax help may be welcome news indeed:

LINK

FREE LARGE PHOTOS DOT COM

Just what it says-- large photo files (mostly scenic travel type shots) that are free for personal use. You can use on a web site simply by crediting the source, and can use commercially by paying a very reasonable use fee:

LINK

ARCHIVE OF THE AMERICAN SOVIET JEWRY MOVEMENT

“The Soviet Jewry Movement (circa 1963-1990) was a worldwide effort to obtain freedom for Jews in the Soviet Union to practice their religion without state persecution or discrimination or to emigrate to Israel, the United States or elsewhere to seek the blessings of freedom, and to pursue lives of their own choosing.

The American Jewish Historical Society has established its Archive of the American Soviet Jewry Movement to help assure that the story of the role played by Americans of all faiths in that Movement will be collected and preserved so that future generations will be familiar with, and inspired by, their achievements. “

LINK

Thursday, March 12, 2009

WE SHALL NOT STAY LONG

Online exhibit at Swiss Info. Full title is “We Shall Not Stay Long: the Story of Swiss-Italian Migrations”:

LINK

OHIO MEMORY

A collaborative project of the Ohio Historical Society and the State Library of Ohio, involving 75,000 primary source materials from 330 libraries, archives, and museums:

LINK

And take a look at Collections: the Ohio Historical Society Blog:

LINK

GOV 2.0

Web 2.0’s been with us for some time now- please welcome Gov 2.0:

LINK

U.S. AIR FORCE LIVE

I am an Air Force vet, so I was pleased to see that the Air Force now has an official blog:

LINK

It apparently “went live” in September 2008-- why didn’t somebody tell me?

INTELLIPEDIA

It’s an online resource sharing tool for our country’s “spooks”-- the cloak and dagger boys and girls who work for our various intelligence agencies. You can’t use it without the necessary security clearance, but you can at least read an interesting article about it:

LINK

Tuesday, March 10, 2009

WHO AM I?

For most of us finding our roots is an absorbing and rewarding hobby; for a man who has no idea who he is or where he came from, it is proving to be an absolute necessity:

LINK

TIL WE METE AGAIN…

Those of you who have had to deal with the old metes & bounds system of land division know that the system takes some getting used to. This guide will help those new to the metes & bounds system, and act as a nice refresher course for those who haven’t had need to use it for a while:

LINK

CALLING ALL KIWIS…

And those of you with Kiwi blood flowing in your veins: now you can search New Zealand birth, death, and marriage records online:

“Welcome to the Birth, Death and Marriage Historical Records website, where you can search New Zealand Government records for births, deaths and marriages (BDM).

The historic data available for you to search is limited so that information relating to people who might still be alive, can be protected. Information available includes:

· Births that occurred at least 100 years ago
· Stillbirths that occurred at least 50 years ago
· Marriages and eventually Civil Unions that occurred 80 years ago
· Deaths that occurred at least 50 years ago or the deceased's date of birth was at least 80 years ago.”

Searches are free, but downloading a record or getting a paper copy is going to cost you:

LINK

Saturday, March 07, 2009

IF HE WALKS LIKE A MONSTER, AND TALKS LIKE A MONSTER…

The lawyer of the Austrian man accused of fathering seven children by the daughter he kept confined in a secret underground dungeon for 24 years says that his client isn’t a monster. Attorney and client apparently don’t expect that statement to meet with widespread acceptance, however: both think the jury in his pending trial (starts March 16) will lock him up for life:

LINK

ALEX HALEY’S KILT OF MANY COLORS…

Author Haley always suspected that there was Scottish blood in the family, but could never prove it—- now DNA testing has shown that he was right on the money:

LINK

DISASTER AT COLOGNE

Article in Der Spiegel Online (auf Englisch) on the collapse of the Historical Archive at Cologne:

LINK

REMEMBERING BRAVEHEART

Available full-text in Google Books:

Documents illustrative of Sir William Wallace: his life and times by Joseph Stevenson. Printed for the Maitland Club, 1841 [Original from the University of Michigan].
Digitized Feb 19, 2008; 203 pages.

LINK

Type “documents Wallace” in the search box (without the quotation marks).

MISSOURI HISTORY MUSEUM LECTURES

Missouri History Museum is sponsoring a series of free lectures this summer and fall:

Weds, 10 June- Noon-1 PM: History on the Side: Interesting Documents in the Archives

Thurs, 18 June- 6:30 PM: Finding Genealogical Treasures

Tues, 27 October- 6:30 PM: Digging Up the Graves: Exploring Death Records

Reservations are not required for this lecture series.

Call 314-361-9017 or go to http://www.mohistory.org for more info.

Friday, March 06, 2009

UPCOMING FAMILY REUNIONS

27 April 2009
BUSCH - MOEHRIG Family Reunion at the Conservation Plaza, New Braunfels, TX, on Sunday, 27 April. Registration 11:30, lunch 12:30, business meeting to follow. Lunch plates $10.00 For more info contact Vickie Moehrig.

5-7 June 2009
QUARLES - The QUARLES Family 200 Years Celebration/Reunion will be in Cookeville/Algood, Tennessee on 5, 6, and 7 June 2009. You are invited to a reunion of the descendants of Lt. WILLIAM PENNINGTON QUARLES, RWA, of Virginia who settled at White Plains, Tennessee, in 1809, present-day Putnam County. Associated families: Burton, Hawes, Hughes, Little, Huntsman, Hyder, Simpson, Lampton, and Snodgrass. Please visit our web site often for new information at:

http://wpquarles2009.info.

Questions' Contact Eunetta Finley Jenkins at mmouse@multipro.com or at 931-526-9072 or 931-260-7651 or at 33 Ferguson Avenue, Cookeville, TN 38501.

June 11-13
OWSLEY - 2009 OWSLEY Family Historical Society Annual Meeting, 11-13 June, Louisville, Kentucky. Details at our revised website: www.ofhs.org.

Save the date, make plans, and tell your relatives we'll gather in Louisville in June for three days of Owsley/Ousley/Housley family sharing, history, and fun. We'll begin with the traditional Thursday evening dessert social; bring photos, new genealogical finds, and tall tales. Our outings include a very special visit to the Frazier International History Museum founded by Owsley Brown Frazier, Louisville philanthropist and former Vice-Chairman of the Brown-Forman Corporation. The Museum brings together two collections: the founder's priceless collection of historical objects, from the family Bible of Daniel Boone to the "big stick" of President Theodore Roosevelt AND displays and artifacts from Britain's Royal Armouries (including the Tower of London). The scope of the museum is from the Battle of Hastings in 1066 (in which our ancestors took part) through Teddy Roosevelt's Presidency and his subsequent African safari, set in over 100,000 square feet of a restored historical building.

We'll also visit a gem for genealogical research, the Filson Historical Society's Library. The extensive collection focuses on Kentucky, the Upper South, and the Ohio Valley (gateway to westward expansion). Holdings reflect origin and destination states for the migrants: Virginia, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana and Missouri. The Library has over 3,500 family histories, nearly 4,000 Kentucky genealogy files, 840 newspapers, much original sheet music, and a Civil War collection. Open days Monday through Friday and first Saturday.

An optional riverboat dinner cruise on the Ohio River is planned for Friday evening. Service is buffet style and there's an open bar. And we should be on the river for sunset.

As always, we end the annual meeting with our Saturday evening banquet. Come early, stay late; there's so much to do and see in Louisville. Sights include the Speed Art Museum, Kentucky Derby Museum, Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft, Farmington Historic House Museum, and Locust Grove (last home of General George Rogers Clark circa 1790 and stopping point for Meriwether Lewis and William Clark on their return from the Pacific).

Marion Baumgarten

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

To add your family reunion to this calendar, please send an announcement to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org

Planning your own family reunion' Read the popular book in the NGS Guide Series by Sandra McLean Clunies, CG: "A Family Affair."

Family reunion planners can find lots of reunion planning info and can request a free copy of Reunions magazine at www.reunionsmag.com.

"Originally published in UpFront with NGS, The Online Newsletter of the National Genealogical Society."

STATISTICAL RESOURCES ON THE WEB

It barely seems to matter what kind of statistic you are searching for: they appear to have links to nearly every kind of statistical info you may be seeking:

LINK

For instance, do you need info on military casualties occurring 1980-present day (for each armed service):

LINK

Thursday, March 05, 2009

NATIONAL MEDAL OF HONOR DAY

Did you know that March 25 is National Medal of Honor Day? Here's a link to a good article on the subject:

LINK

Congratulations and a big thank-you to surviving awardees and to the families of those who are no longer with us!

CIVIL WAR SOLDIER STUDIES

“The editors of Soldier Studies are honored to present, over the next 10 months, a series of articles written by some of the leading historians and authors on the American Civil War. The focus of this series is the soldiers themselves. Though they suffered great hardships, and endured battle and fatigue, through it all they left for posterity a wealth of correspondence and reflections that have helped historians reconstruct what it was like to have been a soldier in the American Civil War. It is our hope that this series makes a respectable contribution to the study of soldiers and their experiences.”

-Chris Wehner, Curator & Founder, SoldierStudies.org

LINK

THE GENERATIONS NETWORK EXPANDS ANCESTRY.COM’S TECHNOLOGY TEAM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:


Mike Wolfgramm Appointed to Chief Technology Officer, Jonathan Young Takes Vice President of Development Position

PROVO, UTAH – March 5, 2009 – The Generations Network (TGN), parent company of Ancestry.com, today announced that current Senior Vice President of Technology, Mike Wolfgramm, has been appointed the company’s Chief Technology Officer. Additionally, Jonathan Young has joined The Generations Network as Ancestry.com’s Vice President of Development.

"For the last ten years, Mike has spearheaded efforts to stay ahead of the company’s continually increasing technology needs, making him a natural choice for this position,” said Tim Sullivan, CEO of The Generations Network. “This new role gives Mike strategic oversight in key areas of growth. He will continue to direct the overall management of and responsibility for all technologies driving our core Ancestry.com platform, in addition to playing an important role for technology matters pertaining to TGN’s international businesses and strategic corporate initiatives.”

Mike Wolfgramm has been with TGN since 1999, serving in executive roles over global technology. His responsibilities included overseeing Ancestry’s global network sites and MyFamily.com and most recently served as the company’s Senior Vice President of Technology. With more than fifteen years of experience in the area of technology and product development, Wolfgramm has served in senior development roles at a number of successful technology and web-based businesses, including Open Market, Inc, Reed Elsevier, Mead Data Central, and WordPerfect. Wolfgramm is a graduate of Brigham Young University, where he received a bachelor's in computer science.

To support Wolfgramm’s new role as Chief Technology Officer, Jonathan Young has recently joined TGN, reporting to Wolfgramm as Vice President of Development. Young’s responsibilities include orchestrating the development and delivery of Ancestry’s global platform, currently incorporating nine international sites. Additionally, Young will partner with Eric Shoup, Vice President of Product, to drive Ancestry product strategy.

“We are pleased to have Jonathan Young join the Ancestry.com team,” said Sullivan. “With Jonathan’s breadth of experience, he’ll be able to advance the growing number of Ancestry.com’s development efforts. He’s a great addition to our team, and I’m confident that he’ll make a very significant contribution to the future success of our organization.”

Jonathan Young joins TGN from Earthlink, where he most recently served as Vice President of Development and was responsible for all development, testing, subscription and billing platforms across multiple sites. Prior to his two years at Earthlink, Young spent ten years at Turner Internet Technologies. While at Turner he served as the Vice President of Product Development, where he was responsible for product management and development functions for Turner's internet properties. Young earned his Bachelors Degree in Astrophysics and Asian Studies from Williams College.

About Ancestry and The Generations Network

The Generations Network, Inc., through its flagship Ancestry.com property, is the world's leading resource for online family history. Ancestry.com has local websites in nine countries and has digitized and put online over 7 billion names and 27,000 historical records collections over the past ten years. Since July 2006, Ancestry.com users have created more than 9 million family trees containing 915 million profiles and 17 million photographs and stories. The Generations Network also includes myfamily.com, Genealogy.com, Rootsweb.ancestry.com, MyCanvas.com, dna.ancestry.com, Family Tree Maker and Ancestry Magazine. More than 9 million unique visitors spent over 4 million hours on a TGN website in January 2009 (comScore Media Metrix, Worldwide).

Web sites:

http://www.ancestry.com/
http://www.myfamily.com/
http://www.genealogy.com/
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/
http://www.mycanvas.com/
http://www.dna.ancestry.com/
http://www.familytreemaker.com/

Wednesday, March 04, 2009

ABOLITION PERIODICALS AT THE PROVIDENCE PUBLIC LIBRARY

Blog post about periodicals at this Rhode Island library associated with William Lloyd Garrison, publisher of The Liberator. It notes that the American Colonization Movement (with which Garrison associated for a time as a young man) was not an abolition movement-- its stated purpose was to relocate free blacks to the west coast of Africa:

LINK

HOW POPULAR IS GENEALOGY?

Not as popular as is so often claimed, according to Dick Eastman, and his arguments are pretty convincing:

LINK

MONOPOLY HELPED THEM ESCAPE MORE THAN JUST BOREDOM…

There’s an e-rumor cruising the Internet which states that large numbers of captured Allied fliers during WWII were able to escape thanks to Monopoly games that included secret maps embedded in the game board and special tools disguised as game pieces. Turns out this e-rumor may be at least partially true:

LINK

ST. LOUIS: BLUE & GRAY

The DeMenil Players will present a radio-style play reading of St. Louis: Blue & Gray at the Chatillon-DeMenil Mansion, 3352 DeMenil Place, on Sunday, 15 March at 12:30 PM and again at 3 PM.

St. Louis: Blue and Gray tells the story of day-to-day life in St. Louis during the Civil War. The story is told through first-hand accounts, images, and memories of people who witnessed events in St. Louis from 1861 to 1865.

The DeMenil Players formed in 2007 to present radio-style readings of plays based on St. Louis history.

These readings of St. Louis: Blue & Gray are free and open to the public. For more information, please call 314-771-5828.

DeMenil Place: http://www.demenil.org

Tuesday, March 03, 2009

DISCOVERING AMERICAN WOMEN’S HISTORY ARCHIVE

“This database provides access to digital collections of primary sources (photos, letters, diaries, artifacts, etc.) that document the history of women in the United States. These diverse collections range from Ancestral Pueblo pottery to Katrina Thomas's photographs of ethnic weddings from the late 20th century. “

LINK

IS MICROFILM EXTINCT YET?

Dick Eastman says not quite-- but it’s only a matter of (not very much) time:

LINK

2009 STLGS FAMILY HISTORY CONFERENCE

Gateways to Your Family History
2009 StLGS Family History Conference

This year's Family History Conference has been scheduled for Saturday, 2 May 2009 at the Maryland Heights Centre, 2344 McKelvey Road, Maryland Heights, MO. Doors open at 7:30 a.m. to pick up registration packets; remarks begin at 8:00 a.m.; speakers begin at 8:30 a.m.

We are excited to announce that our featured speaker for the event will be David Rencher, AG, CG, FIGRS, FUGA, Director of Records and Information Division, Family and Church History Department of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. This organization has taken on the project to convert the Church's vast collection of microfilmed records into indexed digital images, which will then be made available on the Internet.

Dave is a 1980 graduate of Brigham Young University, where he received his degree in Family and Local History. He is the former Director of the Libraries Division of the Family History Department, a position in which he had the responsibility to manage the thousands of family history centers worldwide. He is also a past-president of the Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS). His current assignment promises to transform the way genealogists access original documents pertaining to their family history research.

Additional speakers include Suzanne Russo Adams, AG manager at Ancestry.com; John Dougan, archivist for the State of Missouri; and William Seibert, archivist, NARA's National Personnel Records Center.

This all-day conference is the largest such single-day event in the Midwest. This year's conference features nationally-recognized speakers, outstanding local speakers, a large and bustling vendor area, and an optional lunch.

Lecture topics include: Early American Migration, Simple Beginnings, Irish Civil Registration Records, 1845-Present, Getting the Most Out of Ancestry.com, Dissecting a Civil War Union Pension File, Learn What the Census Can Tell You, and more.

You can register online at www.STLGS.org or download and mail your form to the StLGS office.