YOU ARE VISITOR:



MoSGA Messenger, The Official Blog of the Missouri State Genealogical Association
Serving Missouri ancestor seekers since 7 November 2007

Tom Pearson, Editor

You are visitor:

Thanks for stopping by!

Saturday, February 28, 2009

MYHERITAGE GENEALOGY SEARCH ENGINE UPDATES

The updated “MyHeritage Research” now queries around 12 billion names in 1,526 genealogy databases from across the internet:

Tel Aviv, Israel – February 19, 2009 – Our latest addition made the MyHeritage Genealogy Search Engine more powerful, as we have expanded our database to include now 1,526 genealogically relevant databases, representing more than 12 billion names. You can get to it by going to http://www.myheritage.com/research or you can still access it directly from our software Family Tree Builder. We have expanded our database by 150+ new sources. Some of the new sources are:

 Facebook
 Digg
 Spock people finder
 Michigan Census
 German Emigrants Database
 BMD Registers UK
 USA Gov search
 Western Michigan Newspapers
 Palatines to America
 US Social Security Death Index
 Prague Police Headquarters Conscriptions (1850-1914)
 Consolidated Index of Sephardic Surnames
 Arizona Birth and Death Certificates
 European Patent Office

MyHeritage Research accesses only genealogical resources which helps researchers find those websites and databases most relevant to their unique family histories. This allows you a much quicker and efficient search, so you don't have to wade through volumes of non relevant records.

You can perform a name search using different spelling options: Exact, Soundex, or our unique Megadex spelling variations. Megadex allows you to choose from the most commonly used spelling variations of last names, cutting down on the time needed to research name variations. Read more about Megadex here:

http://www.myheritage.com/FP/Company/megadex.php

Using the Advanced Search option, you can add birth and death dates. Based on the information you enter, our search engine will automatically select the databases most relevant to your search.

There is a lot more information on the Advanced Search on our genealogy blog!

In addition, MyHeritage allow you to store and annotate your searches for further reference. These tools allow you to focus on the results of your search, not the mechanics. We hope those extensions will make it easier for everyone to research their family history and improve the family tree.

About MyHeritage

MyHeritage was founded by a team of people who combine a passion for family history with the development of innovative technology. It is now one of the world’s leading online networks for families, and the second largest family history website. MyHeritage is available in 34 languages and home to more than 28 million family members and 300 million profiles. The company recently acquired Kindo, a family social network, and is based in Bnei Atarot, near Tel Aviv, Israel. For more information, visit www.myheritage.com.

For more information please contact:

Daniel Horowitz
Genealogy and Translation Manager
Office: +972-3-9702614
Email: Daniel@MyHeritage.com

THE ALFRED STERN COLLECTION OF LINCOLNIANA

Owned by the Library of Congress, which has images of 1,300 items from this huge collection on its website:

LINK

LINCOLN PHOTOS ON FLICKR

Majestic group of Lincoln photos added to Flickr by the Library of Congress:

LINK

DOWN THE BAILOUT RABBIT HOLE…

Recovery.gov aims to help us keep track of what the billions in bailout money are theoretically doing to help the little guy (that is, anybody who didn’t get a fat bonus as a reward for running a company that lost money last year):

LINK

SC ARCHIVES ONLINE RECORDS INDEX

The South Carolina Department of Archives and History has an index to its online record collections on its website:

LINK

Friday, February 27, 2009

ALIBRIS FOR LIBRARIES

I know that some of our readers are librarians: they'll be pleased to learn that Alibris, the big online bookseller, has a new site just for libraries:

LINK

Note: Services include Out-of-Print Orders, Want-List-Matching, and a Library Wiki.

STATE DATA RESOURCES

Need statistical info on one or more of the fifty states? There’s probably a link to it here:

LINK

PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARIES

Actually, nice lists of public libraries, state libraries, college libraries, AND presidential libraries:

LINK

STATE ARCHIVES

Nice list of state Archives-- most info appears up-to-date:

LINK

GENEALOGY LIBRARIES IN THE US

Good list of genealogy libraries in the US- most info seems up-to-date:

LINK

Thursday, February 26, 2009

FACING UP TO FACEBOOK

Facebook has been in the news recently-- here's an interesting take on the potential value of the social networking site for genealogists (thanks to Dave for permission to reprint his message here):

From: Dave Lossos
To: Google Group Genealogy in St. Louis
Sent: Thursday, February 26, 2009 8:08 AM
Subject: Have you tried Facebook?

I’m always on the lookout for an "edge" in finding new methods and aids in my genealogical pursuits. After putting off becoming active in Facebook for quite a while, about a month ago I jumped in head-first. I have always considered Facebook a social networking tool mostly for teeny-boppers, something that my soon-to-be grandchildren will use to maintain silly adolescent relationship with their friends.

I have now changed my mind - dramatically. Whatever the initial purpose was, Facebook has become one of the most productive genealogical tools available on the Internet. Once I joined, I added as "friends" a few close relatives and personal acquaintances. Then I noticed that you can also set up your profile to list such things as years that you graduated from college, high school, places you’ve lives, employers you’ve had, etc., etc.

Suddenly I was receiving "Invitations" to become "Friends" with some guys with whom I had graduated from high school, guys that I hadn’t spoken to for nearly 50 years. That was pretty cool, but nothing compared to what I discovered next.

Using the "Search" feature I tried what I’d done numerous times using a global Google search: find a particular surname. With the surname of Lossos, a relatively uncommon name, Google was successful to finding websites that contained the "Lossos" surname. Invariably it would find a bunch of my websites, along with some that referred to scholarly treatises by a few PhDs and MDs. These were individuals that I had attempted to solicit genealogical information from over the years, with very limited success. I had in my database a skeletal outline of them and their ancestors/descendants, but invariably very sketchy data.

Now I was presented with a long list of Lossos Facebook users, all of whom I "Invited" to become "Friends". Every one of them responded, and almost daily I seem to be inputting dates and places of birth into my database that I’d never had before. Now I grant you that the vast majority are 25 years old or younger. However, those are the ones that I have the least amount of information about. Eventually I will create a specific query to each of them, detailing what I know of their ancestry, and see if I can get them (with the help of their parents) to respond with more family info.

One last comment. Facebook also supports "Groups" and Networks. I joined Facebook’s RAOGK (Random Act of Genealogical Kindness) "Group", as well as the "St. Louis, MO" network.

I even created a "Genealogy in St. Louis" group.

If you haven’t tried Facebook, you are missing a great genealogical tool. If you do sign up, be sure to send me an "Invite" so I can be your "Friend".

Dave Lossos

Webmaster of
"Genealogy in St. Louis"
"The Pilgrims and Plymouth Colony: 1620"

Author of:
"Irish St. Louis" (ISBN 0738532223)
"St. Louis Casa Loma Ballroom" (ISBN 0738533785)
"Now & Then - Saint Louis" (ISBN 0738539554)
"Big Book of St. Louis Nostalgia (ISBN 978-0-9787994-9-6) by Bill Nunes
Order Form: http://genealogyinstlouis.accessgenealogy.com/Order.pdf

--~--~---------~--~----~------------~-------~--~----~
----------------------
Be sure to visit the "Genealogy in St. Louis" website at
http://genealogyinstlouis.accessgenealogy.com

HOME LIFE OF THE FACTORY FOLK

Full text of Home Life of the Lancashire Factory Folk During the Cotton Famine (1862):

LINK

SKETCHES OF LANCASHIRE LIFE AND LOCALITIES

Full text of this 1857 publication:

LINK

HELP SAVE SOUTH DAKOTA’S HISTORY!

If you have materials that relate in some way to South Dakota history, the South Dakota State Historical Society is asking you to donate them. It doesn’t have the budget to buy everything it would like to acquire, and so needs the help of folks like you:

LINK

Note: It's perfectly willing to accept good copies of manuscript / unpublished materials...

HAWAII HISTORIC COSTUME COLLECTION

If you’re from there, or were stationed there while in the service, or just spent a few great weeks there on vacation, this virtual exhibit may be of interest:

LINK

Note: My dad was stationed there for some time with the Navy during WWII, and went back on vacations several times before his death. My younger brother was also stationed there while he was in the Navy, but I have not as yet visited the Aloha State...

AFRICAN-AMERICANS THROUGH THE EYES OF NEWSREEL CAMERAMEN

During the period 1919-1963:

LINK

COLLEGE RECORDS 101

Gaining access to college records of a parent or grandparent may be easier than you imagined:

LINK

Note: Although it will really help if you already know what college they attended!

Wednesday, February 25, 2009

CIVIL WAR FIND IN RHODE ISLAND

An archivist rummaging through several boxes of Civil War era materials has come across the shirt collar of Sullivan Ballou. Who, you ask, is Sullivan Ballou? Why, he’s the Civil War officer from Rhode Island who wrote a touching last letter to his wife, Sarah, before being killed at First Manassas in July 1861. If you’ve seen the Ken Burns Civil War documentary, then you’ve already heard an actor read the now-famous Sullivan Ballou letter:

LINK

Note: By the way, death was not the final indignity suffered by Major Ballou…

TECH TALK MADE SIMPLE

Err-- simpler, anyway… If terms like 3G that you hear on the radio and TV simply confuse you, reading this guide to Mobile Tech Talk may help clear your head:

LINK

THANK GOD AUSSIES ARE A HARDY BREED…

Turns out our friends Down Under have faced numerous natural disasters in the past 100 years…

LINK

LOVE AND MARRIAGE IN CANADA

A virtual exhibit about the Canadian way of wooing-- 19th century style:

LINK

CIVIL WAR REGIMENTS

A great magazine that was published by Savas Publishing. Each issue featured articles about particular Civil War regiments. They’ve got a list of back issues available with Tables of Contents on their website:

LINK

Note: Worldcat.org shows that St. Louis Public Library and Missouri History Museum both own this magazine.

Tuesday, February 24, 2009

WHERE IN THE WORLD IS OSAMA BIN LADEN?

A group of geographical researchers say their search model predicts that the terror mastermind is hiding out in a Pakistani border town. Maybe somebody should point this out to the Army and the CIA:

LINK

FINDING A JOB

Best ways to find a job appear to be changing as technology changes:

LINK

FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE: THE WOUNDED SOLDIER'S FRIEND

Online book at the Internet Archive:

LINK

GOOD THING HE WASN'T HIS OWN SECRETARY…

Because our 16th president wasn't very good at filing, organizing, or
delegating routine tasks:

LINK

Was he a good father? If you were one of his children, you would certainly say yes, but if you weren't, not so much:

LINK

MILITARY HISTORY QUARTERLY

Spring 2009 issue Table of Contents (some content is available free online):

LINK

Note: You can also take a look at America's Civil War:

LINK

Or maybe British Heritage:

LINK

Saturday, February 21, 2009

BLASTS FROM THE PAST

There’s a project underway (KEEP) to create software that can read any computer program created from the 1970s to the present day:

LINK

THEY’VE GOT TO EAT, TOO, AFTER ALL…

The Presidential Food Resource Guide on the Library of Congress website:

LINK

Note: To think I’d always assumed that the White House chef just opened a bag of Purina Politician Chow…

YES, BUT IN WHAT ORDER?

A social worker says that when troops return home from combat areas, their first order of business is beer, sex, and pizza:

LINK

THE PERSONAL TOUCH

Turns out President Obama has been quietly personalizing letters of condolence sent to the families of soldiers and airmen killed in Afghanistan and Iraq:

LINK

COWBOY PRESIDENTS

Commentators from other countries like to call our presidents “cowboys,” but turns out some of them really were-- or at some point in their lives wanted to be-- cowboys:

LINK

Thursday, February 19, 2009

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS DIGITAL PRESERVATION NEWSLETTER

February 2009 issue has interesting article on preservation of virtual worlds:

LINK

FAMILY HISTORY EXPOS

Family History Expos.com is a site I hadn’t seen before-- site design is certainly attractive:

LINK

TEN COSTLIEST BATTLES OF THE CIVIL WAR

The figures are staggering, but keep in mind that “casualties” doesn’t count just men killed-- it also includes wounded, missing, and captured men:

LINK

A not-so-minor quibble: I would not call Chickamauga a clearcut Confederate victory. It’s true Union forces were driven from the field, but only after George Thomas’ outnumbered troops inflicted heavy casualties on Braxton Bragg’s forces. As a high-ranking Confederate officer said after the battle, “One more such victory and we shall be ruined!”

HOMESTEAD ACT OF 1862

Curious about homesteading and the Homestead Act of 1862? Here’s a great place to start your research:

LINK

IF YOUR HEART’S IN THE HIGHLANDS…

You’ll like this article on Getting Started that’s available on the ScotlandsPeople website:

LINK

Note: I don’t know that I’ve got a drop of Scottish blood in me, but a trip to Scotland nine years ago has irrevocably hooked me on all things Scottish…

Wednesday, February 18, 2009

WHAT’S NEW AT ANCESTRY.COM

January and February have been very busy months for the friendly folks at Engulf & Devour. Here’s a list of what's been added / updated during January and February 2009:

LINK

REMEMBER GOLIAD!

Most of you probably remember the Alamo, but how many of you remember the Goliad Massacre?

LINK

MESSAGE BOARDS

A post on the 24/7 Family History Blog reminds us about the millions of queries on Ancestry.com message boards:

LINK

GENETIC TESTING JUST GOT MORE AFFORDABLE

Ancestry.com just dropped its price from $149 to $79- if you’ve been thinking about taking a plunge into the gene pool, now’s probably a very good time to do so:

LINK

MAPS 1910-1914

Beautiful scans of state maps (from the period 1910-1914):

LINK

IT'S ALL BECAUSE OF YOU...

That this blog just passed the 40,000 visitors mark! Thanks for your continuing support for this blog and for the Missouri State Genealogical Association!

Tom Pearson, Editor, MoSGA Messenger

Saturday, February 14, 2009

LINCOLN THE LAWYER

Available on the Library of Congress website:

Lincoln the Lawyer

“Lincoln's effort to restore the Union and his contributions to American political thought and its ideals of freedom often obscure the fact that he had been a successful attorney. Lincoln himself admitted his ambition lay in politics and not in the law, "My forte is as a Statesman, rather than a Prosecutor." Even if the law was Lincoln's "secondary" avocation, it was indelibly linked to him in life...and death. The Law Library of Congress' historical collection vividly illustrates three periods in which the law played a prominent part of the Lincoln era.

First, Lincoln the Lawyer is comprised of works specifically on his work as a prominent Illinois lawyer.

Second, Habeas Corpus and the War Powers of the President covers contemporary literature at Lincoln's controversial balancing of civil liberties against the demands of war aims. Most notoriously, he and his administration several times suspended the writ of habeas corpus, a writ by which prisoners can challenge the legality their detention, drawing the ire of political foes.

Finally, The Assassination: Trials contains period transcripts and reports of the trial of the surviving conspirators in the murder of the President and attempted murder of other public officials. George Atzerodt, David Herold, Lewis Payne/Powell, and Mary Surratt were convicted of the crimes and executed. Samuel Arnold, Michael O'Laughlen, Dr. Samuel Mudd, and Edman Spangler were also convicted and received prison sentences.”

LINK

HONEST ABE MISSIVE BAGS BIG BUCKS

In case you haven’t heard as yet, a handwritten speech of President Lincoln's from 1864 sold on February 12th for $3.44 million. Yes, that’s a number with a WHOLE LOT of zeros:

LINK

HE SAID WHAT?

Now you can easily find out what President Obama said in 200 different speeches made between 2002-2009:

LINK

IT LASTED HOW LONG?

Well, they called it The Hundred Years War, which I consider a pretty good clue to its duration-- now the National Archives (UK) is planning to digitize 113 unpublished manuscripts from that era of British and French history:

LINK

VIRGINIA TECH SHOOTING ARCHIVE

Online archive of materials relating to the campus mass murder that occurred on 16 April 2007:


LINK

Friday, February 13, 2009

MARCH 2009 GENIE EVENTS

14 March 2009
Mishawaka, IN - The South Bend Area Genealogical Society will host its “Michiana Genealogical Fair 2009” on Saturday, March 14, at the downtown Mishawaka-Penn-Harris Public Library, 209 Lincoln Way East, Mishawaka, Indiana 46544. Featured speaker will be Mr. Jeff Bockman, speaking on "Using Maps for Genealogical Research" and "No Birth Certificate, No Problem." Over twenty genealogical materials vendors and exhibitors will also be present for attendees browsing and assistance. For more details, visit us online at http://www.sbags.org or email WHMinish@aol.com.

14 March 2009
New Bern, NC - Overcoming Brick Walls Workshop. Craig Roberts Scott, CG, will provide a four-part workshop "Overcoming Brickwalls." The talks include: Service Not Found: Finding Your Ancestor in the Military; Maiden Name Not Found: Finding Your Female Ancestors; Land Not Found: Finding Your Ancestor on the Ground; and Where Oh Where: Using the Internet to Solve Brickwall Problems.

This workshop, to be held at the Broad Street Christian Church, New Bern, is cosponsored by the North Carolina Genealogical Society and the Craven County Genealogical Society. For more information, visit http://www.ncgenealogy.org.

14 March 2009
Brea, CA - A one day Seminar sponsored by the Genealogical Society of North Orange County California entitled One-Step Webpages: A Potpourri of Genealogical Search Tools featuring Stephen Morse, Ph.D., creator of the One-Step Website(www.stevemorse.org) in his first Orange County appearance. Dr. Morse has been honored by both the National Genealogical Society and Association of Professional Genealogists for his work.

Topics to be covered include: in-depth review of many of the 150+ one-step tools created by Dr. Morse; DNA and Genetic Genealogy; and US Census tools. The seminar will run from 8AM to 4PM and will take place at the Brea United Methodist Church, 480 N. State College Blvd., Brea, CA 92821. Member donation is $25, non-member donation is $30 and at the door donation is $35. A professionally catered box lunch is available for $9 by pre-registration only before 6 March 2009. For more information, go to www.gsnocc.org for registration and map.

21 March 2009
Hot Springs Village, AR - Village Genealogical Society, Hot Springs Village, Arkansas, "2009 Spring Family History Workshop" featuring internationally known speaker and columnist Michael John Neill, M.S. Topics of the all-day workshop will be "Researching the Entire Family," "Problem Solving Applied to Genealogy," "I Found it; Now What’" "Tried and Tested Tidbits." Workshop hours are 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Registration fee $35. For registration form and details, please call Jeanette Frahm 501-922-9220, e-mail J44F65@yahoo.com, or visit http://pages.suddenlink.net/hsvgs/

28 March 2009
Virginia Beach, VA - Virginia Beach Genealogical Society's 2009 Annual Conference, "Tell Me About It," features well-recognized author, teacher, publisher, and wit, John Philip Colletta, Ph.D.. Dr. Coletta will give 4 presentations to fine-tune your genealogical research and writing in his unique, energetic, and entertaining style on Saturday, 28 March 2009, 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m at Central Library, Virginia Beach VA. His topics are Lesser-Used Federal Records; Libraries, Archives & Public Records Offices: Understanding Resource Repositories; Effective Interviewing; and Turning Biographical Facts into Real-Life Events: How to Build Historical Context. You'll also find exhibitors, vendors, door prizes, free DNA kits, magazines, goodies, and much more. Registration form required plus $35 members/$40 for nonmembers. Add $5 for payment received after 16 March 2009. For registration form and details, please call J. B. Wright 757.495.0672, email jwright73@cox.net, or visit www.rootsweb.com/~vavbgs.

28 March 2009
Kalamazoo, MI - The The Kalamazoo Valley Genealogical Society (KVGS) Spring Conference will be held at the Fetzer Center, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan from 9:00 to 4:00. Featured speaker Paula Stuart-Warren's topics will be "NUCMC & its Cousins: Keys to Lost Ancestral Records," "Tho' They Were Poor, They May Have Been Rich in Records," "Organizing Your Genealogical Materials," and "Finding Ancestral Places of Origin." Cost (buffet lunch included) is $40 for KVGS members, $45 for non-members. For a downloadable registration form, see www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~mikvgs/ and look under the 2009 calendar.

To add your event to this calendar, please send an announcement to UpFront@ngsgenealogy.org.

"Originally published in UpFront with NGS, The Online Newsletter of the National Genealogical Society."

GINGERBREAD ARCHITECTURE

These folks are serious when it comes to gingerbread houses:

LINK

ROOTSWEB GUIDES

Did you know that Rootsweb provides 31 guides to genealogical subjects covering a wide variety of research specialties?

LINK

For instance, Guide #8, Why You Can’t Find Your Ancestors- a guide sure to be of interest to many genealogists!

Thursday, February 12, 2009

THE 99+ GENEALOGY THINGS MEME

A suggestion about the need for a 99 Genealogy Things Meme by yours truly really got a big reaction on other genie blogs:

LINK

LINK

WALNUT HILL CEMETERY PROJECT

St. Clair County (IL) Genealogical Society has taken on the rather daunting task of digitizing a fairly large cemetery-- and they’re making tremendous headway:

“The names, death dates, and headstone photographs of over 31,000 interments in Walnut Hill Cemetery 1850 through circa 1992 will appear on this website as a memorial tribute to the men and women buried there. This all-volunteer project is sponsored and funded by the St. Clair County (Illinois) Genealogical Society (SCCGS). SCCGS provides these transcriptions and Website monument images free of charge in fulfillment of one of its purposes: to preserve ancestral data. More indexes, and a search box, appear on the SCCGS Home Page.”

SCCGS Home Page

Walnut Hill Cemetery Project Main Page

Note: Walnut Hill Cemetery Project Manager is Diane Walsh-- she’s also the Society’s Quarterly Editor and Webmaster!

UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA HISTORICAL MAPS ARCHIVE:

These folks have digitized a WHOLE LOT of maps:

About Their Collection:

“The Historical Map Archive is a digitized collection of selected map holdings from sources including the ones listed below. We are indebted to these organizations for their cooperation in facilitating the introduction of these digital maps to the Internet.”

CONTRIBUTORS:

* University of Alabama Map Library: 13,174

* Murray Hudson, Halls, Tennessee: 6,207

* W.S. Hoole Special Collections Library: 3,166

* Geological Survey of Alabama: 3,529

* Serial maps compiled from various contributors: 2,665

* NOAA Central Library: 1,887

* Alabama Department of Archives and History: 1,762

* Adams Antiques, Northport, Alabama: 1,214

* Rucker Agee Map Collection (Birmingham Public Library): 973

* Amelia Gayle Gorgas Library: 920

* Antique Atlas, Riverside, Alabama: 321

* The personal collection of Dr. Robert Burckhalter: 106

* The personal collection of Dr. Gerald Webster: 88

* Samford University Special Collections Library: 58

* U.S. Army Corps of Engineers: 32

* Tulsa City-County Library: 25

* Tennessee Valley Authority: 22

* The personal collection of Whitney Telle: 11

* Alabama Department of Transportation: 6

* The personal collection of David Robb: 6

* The personal collection of Robert M. Baker: 5

* The personal collection of Mike Berryhill: 2

* The personal collection of Thomas M. West, Jr.: 1

* Alabama Power Company: 1

* University of Alabama Press: 1

* University of Alabama Office of Land Management: 1

* Last updated February 11,2009

LINK

ANCESTRY CIVIL WAR COLLECTION

ANCESTRY.COM MARKS LINCOLN BICENTENNIAL WITH LAUNCH OF FIVE NEW DATABASES FEATURING MILLIONS OF NEW CIVIL WAR ERA RECORDS

World’s Leading Online Family History Resource Adds More Than 4 Million New Records to Its Civil War Collection, Including More Than 20,000 Letters Written to and from Lincoln

PROVO, UTAH – Feb. 12, 2009 – Ancestry.com, the world’s largest online resource for family history, announced today it will commemorate the 200th birthday of one of the nation’s greatest Presidents – Abraham Lincoln – with the addition of five new databases to its Civil War Collection. This historically significant collection includes unique content such as photographs, handwritten letters, slave manifests and pension applications, and spans the days of slavery to the Civil War and through Reconstruction. The new databases will make millions of important Civil War era records easily searchable alongside other records already available at Ancestry.com, creating the largest online collection of Civil War documents, containing more than 12 million names.

Among the five new databases, The Abraham Lincoln Papers is an incredible collection of more than 20,000 documents – most from the 1850s through Lincoln’s presidential years – which include drafts of speeches and the Emancipation Proclamation, incoming and outgoing correspondence and notes, and printed material. The Abraham Lincoln Papers Collection will be searchable for free on Ancestry.com.

“We’re very proud to be adding these amazing Civil War era historical materials to our already robust Civil War Collection,” said Gary Gibb, Vice President for U.S. Content for Ancestry.com. “As the 200th birthday of one of our nation’s greatest Presidents approaches, we thought it was the perfect time to add these databases to our site and to help individuals discover their family members who lived during a time of such dramatic change in America.”

The Civil War Collection is part of Ancestry.com’s U.S. Military Collection, which includes more than 100 million names from the 1600s through Vietnam. The five new Civil War era databases now available on Ancestry.com include:

· Abraham Lincoln Papers (from the Library of Congress) – a collection of more than 20,000 letters written to and from President Lincoln, as well as drafts of speeches. The collection includes a letter from Mary Lincoln, Lincoln’s wife, who chides him for not responding promptly to her letters and requests a check for $100. Other documents include a draft of Lincoln’s speech from 1863 condemning slavery and a letter from May 11, 1863 written by Ellie B. Reno, niece of Brig. Gen. Jesse Reno – who had disguised herself as a male to fight in the Union Army – asking him, “…iff [sic] I can remain in your Service…” These letters can be searched for free on Ancestry.com.

· New Orleans Slave Manifests, 1807-1860 – includes images of ship manifests transporting more than 30,000 slaves en route to New Orleans from the upper Southern states. It offers insights into the lives of these men and women, who were likely being moved to the lower Southern states to provide labor for the booming cotton industry. The manifests will be transcribed by a global community of family history enthusiasts through Ancestry.com’s World Archives Project in the coming months.

· Confederate Pension Applications from Georgia – more than 60,000 records documenting pension applications filed in Georgia from Confederate soldiers and their widows. As part of the application process, applicants answered a series of questions about themselves and signed the document, resulting in a wealth of personal information.

· Confederate Applications for Presidential Pardons – a collection containing more than 15,000 records of former Confederate soldiers and government officials requesting Presidential pardons.

· U.S. Civil War Soldier Records and Profiles – contains more than 4.2 million records and profiles about nearly every officer and soldier who fought in the Civil War. Many of the records include actual photographs of the individuals.

Over the next two years, Ancestry.com will add millions more historical records from the Civil War period to its Web site, as the country approaches the sesquicentennial (150th) anniversary of that historic conflict. The five new Civil War databases are now available online as part of Ancestry.com’s Civil War Collection at http://www.ancestry.com/civilwar.

About Ancestry and The Generations Network:

The Generations Network, Inc., through its flagship Ancestry.com property, is the world's leading resource for online family history. Ancestry.com has local websites in nine countries and has digitized and put online over 7 billion names and 27,000 historical records collections over the past ten years. Since July 2006, Ancestry.com users have created 9 million family trees containing 865 million profiles and 16 million photographs and stories. The Generations Network also includes myfamily.com, Genealogy.com, Rootsweb.ancestry.com, MyCanvas.com, dna.ancestry.com, Family Tree Maker and Ancestry Magazine. More than 7.9 million unique visitors spent over 4 million hours on a TGN website in December 2008 (comScore Media Metrix, Worldwide).

Wednesday, February 11, 2009

RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL BOOKS

“View 253 digitised Renaissance festival books (selected from over 2,000 in the British Library's collection) that describe the magnificent festivals and ceremonies that took place in Europe between 1475 and 1700-- marriages and funerals of royalty and nobility, coronations, stately entries into cities and other grand events.”

These books will likely prove of interest if you need information about:

Court history
Early music
European royalty and the nobility
History of costume
Illustrated books
Military history
Performing arts
Renaissance and Early Modern Europe
Renaissance architecture
Renaissance cities
Social and economic history
Tournaments

LINK

BRITISH LIBRARY BLOGS

It sponsors quite a few-- one will most likely interest you!

LINK

BALTIMORE CHURCH RECORD TRANSCRIPTIONS

If you’re researching German ancestors who lived in / passed through Baltimore, these transcriptions may prove of interest:

LINK

FREE IMAGES

A list of thirty sites where you can find copyright-free images:

LINK

Tuesday, February 10, 2009

RESEARCHING YOUR CIVIL WAR SOLDIER

The Civil War Preservation Trust’s website offers a good intro to researching Civil War soldiers for the student starting a school project or the adult genealogist who is just starting to research a CW ancestor:

LINK

CIVIL WAR BOOK REVIEW

Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge hosts this site that features reviews of recently published books about the Civil War:

LINK

EASY DIARY

If you’ve finally decided to leave some memories of your own life for your descendents, this program may prove useful:

“Record your memories / appointments with ease. Each user can lock / unlock personal files by using his / her password. Also, users can search previous memories / appointments.”

LINK

Note: You should always check downloaded files with your security software before installing on your computer-- better safe than sorry!

ABRAHAM LINCOLN EVENTS

BICENTENNIAL UPDATE
ABRAHAM LINCOLN PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY & MUSEUM
FEBRUARY 2009

VISIT THE OFFICIAL ILLINOIS BICENTENNIAL WEBSITE


PERFORMANCES AND MUSIC

Tuesday, February 10
Program of Spirituals
12 - 12:45 pm
Dr. Naima Johnston explores this historical American art form, sharing history and meaning.
Presidential Museum, Plaza
Museum admission required

Wednesday, February 11
One Destiny Performance
3 - 3:30 pm
Events of the fateful night of Lincoln's assassination, retold by Ford's Theatre manager and actor.
Presidential Museum, Union Theater
Museum admission required

Wednesday, February 11
Illinois Symphony Orchestra Performance
6:30 pm Pre-Concert Celebration
7 pm Concert
-Let Freedom Sing!- is a citywide musical celebration featuring the ISO. Special guest narrator is Bill Kurtis, award-winning television journalist and producer, Jerry Lambert, News Channel 20 Anchor and Fritz Klein, Lincoln reenactor.
Prairie Capital Convention Center
9th & Adams
Free admission

Thursday, February 12
From My Front Porch Performance
10:30 am
Rose Allen talks about life in 1863 Springfield in this theatrical piece of living history.
Presidential Museum, Plaza
Museum admission required

Thursday, February 12
Meet the Lincolns Performance
11:15 am - Noon
Mr. and Mrs. Lincoln, aka Michael Krebs and Debra Ann Miller, welcome you.
Presidential Museum, Union Theater
Museum admission required

Thursday, February 12
The Lincoln Trio
12 pm
Presented by Illinois' famed Ravinia Festival, the Lincoln Trio performs as part of their Bicentennial Tour. Formed in 2003, the Lincoln Trio has emerged as one of Chicago's most celebrated chamber ensembles.
Lincoln Home

Thursday, February 12
The Four Sopranos
12:15 pm - 12:45 pm
Performance of Spirituals
Presidential Museum, Plaza
Museum admission required

Thursday, February 12
One Destiny Performance
2:15 - 2:45 pm and 4:15 - 4:45 pm
Events of the fateful night of Lincoln's assassination, retold by Ford's Theatre manager and actor.
Presidential Museum, Union Theater
Museum admission required

Friday, February 13
The Lincoln Trio
10 am
Presented by Illinois' famed Ravinia Festival, the Lincoln Trio performs as part of their Bicentennial Tour. Formed in 2003, the Lincoln Trio has emerged as one of Chicago's most celebrated chamber ensembles.
Presidential Museum, Plaza
Museum admission required

Friday, February 13
From My Front Porch Performance
11:15 am
Rose Allen talks about life in 1863 Springfield in this theatrical piece of living history.
Presidential Museum, Plaza
Museum admission required

Friday, February 13
Meet the Lincolns Performance
12 - 12:45 pm
Mr. and Mrs. Lincoln, aka Michael Krebs and Debra Ann Miller, welcome you.
Presidential Museum, Union Theater
Museum admission required

Friday, February 13
Lincoln & Frederick Douglass
Emancipation and the Dream of Freedom - From Slavery to the White House
2 pm
Featuring Lincoln, Douglass, Harriet Tubman, and Martin Luther King, Jr.
Lincoln Home Visitor Center

Friday, February 13
One Destiny Performance
3 - 3:30 pm
Events of the fateful night of Lincoln's assassination, retold by Ford's Theatre manager and actor.
Presidential Museum, Union Theater
Museum admission required

Friday-Sunday, February 13-15
Our American Cousin
by Springfield Theatre Centre
Authentic staging of the hit comedy attended by the Lincolns on the night of his assassination. Play about British and American manners.
Hoogland Center for the Arts
420 S 6th St
Tickets at (217) 414-8905

Saturday, February 14
Lincoln & Frederick Douglass
Emancipation and the Dream of Freedom - From Slavery to the White House
10 am
Featuring Lincoln, Douglass, Harriet Tubman, and Martin Luther King, Jr.
Lincoln Home Visitor Center

Saturday, February 14
Music of the Lincoln Era
1 - 3 pm
Music of Lincoln's era performed by singers and musicians.
Lincoln Home Visitor Center

Saturday, February 14
Abraham Lincoln: A Biography in Words and Music
4 pm
Features Lincoln and other historical characters talking about his life with performances of related period music.
Lincoln Home

WEST VIRGINIA LIBRARY & ARCHIVES NEWSLETTER

It’s available full-text online (March 2000-February 2009):

LINK

Friday, February 06, 2009

TRAILS, RAILS, AND PADDLE WHEELS

Trails, Rails and Paddle Wheels-- Migration Across the Nation
Saturday, 14 March, 9:00 am to 5:00 pm;
and Sunday, 15 March, 1:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Featured Speaker: Pamela Boyer, CG, CGL

Our ancestors traveled from home to new home by foot, horseback, trains and steamboat. Many took the same trails, and made the same migration as hundreds of others before them. These patterns can help us find long-lost relatives and understand the pioneer. This two day seminar will explore these themes through a series of discussions with genealogy experts. There will be door prizes, snacks, goody bags and fun!

Fee: $30.00, deadline March 1. For more information call 816-252-7228 or email ge@mcpl.lib.mo.us

Send fee, name, address, and phone number to:

Midwest Genealogy Center
Mid-Continent Public Library
3440 S. Lee's Summit Road
Independence, MO 64055.

Discount hotel pricing arranged with Comfort Suites Independence.
Call 816-373-9880 for details. Code: Midwest Genealogy.



Plantations to the Plains
21 Feb 9:30 am to 4:30 pm
FREE Seminar
Cohost Mid-America Arican-American Genealogy Interest Coalition (magickc.org)
Classes 9:30 and 10:30 about African-American and Slavery research.
Dr. Rozelle speaking at 11:30
Lunch 12:30 to 2:00

Film “The Garrett Morgan Story”.
2:00 pm Producers will talk about new project, Exodusters (ex-slaves in 1870 moving up the Mississippi to St. Louis, across Missouri to KC (Quindaro) and into Kansas. Many churches, white and black, helped them throughout the state, i.e. food, jobs, tent cities.). Producers are researching families and the churches.


Angela McComas
Reference Assistant, Programming
Midwest Genealogy Center
Phone (816) 252-7228
Mid-Continent Public Library

CIVIL WAR IN YOUR CLASSROOM

Civil war may be the last thing teachers reading this post want in their classrooms, but I’m talking the historical event, not flying book bags and body parts in your middle school. The Civil War Preservation Trust provides on its website a state-by-state list of Classroom Visitors—that is, re-enactors who are willing to appear at schools in the Civil War soldier / civilian persona they have adopted. It may interest you in these economic tough times to learn that some of these re-enactors will appear completely free-of-charge:

LINK

WHITMAN’S WARTIME WASHINGTON

A fascinating illustrated examination of Walt Whitman’s work during the Civil War as a volunteer nurse: it offers fascinating insights into Whitman, his poetry, and Civil War medicine:

LINK

RUSSIA WARNS NEIGHBORS TO REMEMBER THE RED ARMY…

And the "decisive" role it played in defeating the Nazis during World War II. Russian President Dmitri Medvedev made the remarks during a speech marking the 65th anniversary of the lifting of the siege of Stalingrad (now Leningrad) in 1944.

It's certainly true that the Red Army suffered horrific losses during years of struggle against the Nazis-- but neighbors like Ukraine and Estonia keep reminding the world that Hitler and Stalin were buddy-buddy until Hitler reneged on their Non-Aggression Pact:

LINK

LINCOLN EXHIBITS

In Springfield, Illinois-- Honest Abe's pre-White House stomping ground:

BICENTENNIAL UPDATE
ABRAHAM LINCOLN PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY & MUSEUM

VISIT THE OFFICIAL ILLINOIS BICENTENNIAL WEBSITE

EXHIBITS

FEBRUARY 6 throughout 2009
From Humble Beginnings: Lincoln's Illinois
8:30 am - 5 pm
New exhibit exploring the State of Illinois in the years Lincoln lived here.
Illinois State Museum at 502 Spring Street
Free admission

Sunday, February 8
The Lincoln Project
Opens to the Public
9 am - 5 pm
Noon - 3 pm Meet the Artist
Exhibition of paintings by Chicago artist Don Pollack.
Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum, Illinois Gallery
Museum admission required

Monday, February 9 - February 16
Lincoln Portrait in Post-Its
Chris Killham, Illinois Wesleyan University alumnus, working with local volunteers and art students, will build larger-than-life portraits of Lincoln entirely out of post-it notes- watch the progress from the street on each side of the skyway that spans Jefferson Street. On the 9th, Chris starts the project in the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum's Plaza.

Thursday, February 12
Lincoln in Illinois
Opens to Public
9 am - 5 pm
Exhibition of photographs by Ron Schramm of Lincoln sculptures in Illinois.
Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library
Free admission

EBOOK SEARCHES DOUBLE IN ONE YEAR…

In the UK-- although it wouldn’t surprise me to hear that searches have also doubled in the US. The wake-me-when-it’s-over economy may well send more people looking for free books online:

LINK

TOP 10 WEB 2.0 TOOLS FOR STUDENTS

Some of these online applications might be of use to genealogists, also:

LINK

RSS FEEDS FROM CDC

If you work in the health care field, or have some other pressing need for medical information, you’ll like the new RSS feeds page on the Centers for Disease Control website:

LINK

FACTS FOR BLACK HISTORY MONTH 2009

From the Census Bureau:

LINK

For instance:

2.4 million: Number of single-race black military veterans in the United States in 2007. More military veterans are black than any other minority group.

Thursday, February 05, 2009

WHO DO YOU THINK YOU ARE?

An American TV version:

From NBC at
http://www.nbc.com/Primetime/Who_Do_You_Think_You_Are/index.shtml

THE ANSWERS LIE IN THE PAST

From producer Lisa Kudrow comes a new series that is unlike anything on U.S. television. Based on the popular BBC documentary series, Who Do You Think You Are? takes viewers on an inspiring and personal journey into the past of America's best-known celebrities, sharing their emotion and surprise as they uncover stories of heroism, tragedy, love and betrayal that lie at the heart of their family story. At the same time, the series celebrates the making of our great nation and the people who traveled here in search of freedom and opportunity.

One-hour alternative series.

The program will be on Mondays at 8 pm beginning 20 April 2009.

CENSUS OF CANADA, 1891

You can do a free search of the 1891 Canadian Census on the Library and Archives Canada website. A search returns a result like this:

1. Pearson, (Surname) / Thomas (Given name) / 14 (Age) / Ontario (Province) / Welland (District name) / Crowland (Sub-district name)

Maybe not all the info you’d like, but a nice start, anyway…

LINK

HER BACK PAGES…

Can anybody out there help this beleaguered librarian?

One of your members has generously donated back issues of the MoSGA Journal and Newsletter to us. I am preparing them for the bindery, to become a permanent part of our reference collection. Let me know if there is a way to obtain any of these missing issues, otherwise we will bind those volumes as incomplete.

Missing MoSGA Journals:

2005 XXV, No. 1, 3 and 4
2006 XXVI, No. 1, 2 and 3
2007 XXVII, No. 4

Missing Show Me State Newsletters:

2001 LXXXII/1, LXXXII3
1999 LXXX/1
1998 LXXIX/3

Duplicates offered for trade:

1995 all
1996 all
1997 all
1998 1, 2, 4
1999 all
2000 2, 3, 4
2001 1

Thank you,

Andrea Welter
Administrative Assistant, Virginia Room
City of Fairfax Regional Library
703-293-2143

GUIDE TO CENSUS OF ENGLAND AND WALES

They’ve created one every ten years since 1801 (excepting 1941, when they REALLY had their hands full). The National Archives (UK) provides a free online guide to making use of the census:

LINK

There’s also a book guide to the England / Wales census available for purchase from Amazon.com:

Census: the Expert Guide by Peter Christian and Dave Annal

“Written by bestselling author Peter Christian and National Archives (UK) census expert Dave Annal, this fascinating guide shows how using the census can transform your family research. It shows how to interpret intricate details of your ancestors’ lives, from names, addresses and ages to family relationships, status and occupations as well as revealing what may be hidden between the lines. As the National Archives release of the 1911 census once used by MI5 to track down enemy aliens comes ever closer, Census offers the perfect way to prepare and get ahead of the game. Discover how to get the very best from online research, selecting the most useful websites and best quality images, as well as the experts techniques for approaching original records, microfilm, CDs and DVDs. Complete with illustrations, photographs, screenshots and case histories Census is an invaluable companion and guide for anyone exploring this unique resource.”

LINK

Wednesday, February 04, 2009

YOU LIKE LITERATURE, YOU REALLY LIKE IT...

Well, more so than you have for quite some time...

Literary reading on the rise for first time in history of Arts Endowment survey
January 12, 2009

Washington, D.C. -- For the first time in more than 25 years, American adults are reading more literature, according to a new study by the National Endowment for the Arts. Reading on the Rise documents a definitive increase in rates and numbers of American adults who read literature, with the biggest increases among young adults, ages 18-24. This new growth reverses two decades of downward trends cited previously in NEA reports such as Reading at Risk and To Read or Not To Read.

"At a time of immense cultural pessimism, the NEA is pleased to announce some important good news. Literary reading has risen in the U.S. for the first time in a quarter century," said NEA Chairman Dana Gioia. "This dramatic turnaround shows that the many programs now focused on reading, including our own Big Read, are working. Cultural decline is not inevitable."

LINK

Note: It appears that the economic meltdown is also helping libraries: more people are stopping by for help locating job leads and polishing up resumes…

TRI-COUNTY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY NEWSLETTER

The January 2009 Tri-County Genealogical Society Newsletter has been posted on our website at www.rootsweb.com/~motcogs/.

Regards,

Nancy Thompson
Tri-County Genealogical Society
218 West Walnut St, Nevada, MO 64772

email: tricountygenealogy@centurytel.net

website: http://www.rootsweb.com/~motcogs/

1930 ERA CITY DIRECTORIES AT NARA

“This page lists microfilmed city directories available at National Archives Building, 700 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Washington, DC 20408-0001, and at Regional Facilities in major cities around the country.”

Now, as they make very clear:

This microfilm is NOT available for sale from NARA.” So don’t ask…

LINK

Note: The list does give you a good idea of what’s available for a given area during the specified time period!

MISSOURI HISTORY MUSEUM GENEALOGY AND LOCAL HISTORY INDEX

In January, the following three sources were indexed and added to the Missouri History Museum Genealogy and Local History Index:

LINK

1. Memorial book of the Concord Farmers Club, 1877-1958 (photocopy).

The Concord Farmers Club was located in south St. Louis County. This three-volume memorial book contains handwritten memorial sketches of members of the club who died between 1877 and 1958. The memorial sketches usually include the member’s date and place of birth, date of death, place of burial, and other biographical notes. Parents’ names and wife’s name (if married) are often included. Please note that the index entries refer not only to the name of the deceased member, but also the
names of those within each memorial sketch (i.e., wife's name, children's names, parents’ names, name of business partner). If an index entry refers to a memorial sketch of a club member, the REMARKS field contains the phrase ‘memorial sketch of’; if an index entry refers to an individual mentioned in a memorial sketch, the REMARKS field contains the phrase ‘mentioned in a memorial sketch.’

2. Fest-Schrift zur Goldenen Jubilaeums-Feier des Schweizer Maenner-Chor, 1872-1922 (St. Louis, Mo.: Schweizer Maenner-Chor, 1922).

This publication contains two group photographs of committee members and several business advertisements.

3. Who’s Who in the Central States: A Biographical Dictionary of Leading Men and Women of the Central States (Chicago: Larkin, Roosevelt & Larkin, 1947).

This book contains brief biographical sketches that usually contain the individual’s name; occupation; date and place of birth; parents’ names; spouse’s name; children’s names; educational degrees earned; notes on professional career; club and association memberships; religious and political affiliation; business address; and home address. Please note that the index entries refer not only to the name of the individual who is profiled, but also the names of those within each biographical sketch (i.e., spouse's name, children's names, parents’ names). If an index entry refers to a biographical sketch, the REMARKS field contains the phrase ‘biographical sketch of’; if an index entry refers to an individual mentioned in a biographical sketch, the REMARKS field contains the phrase ‘mentioned in a biographical sketch.’ The ADDRESS field in this index refers to the individual’s residential address. This book has been selectively indexed, including only those sketches in which the individual was born in St. Louis City or County, or resided in St. Louis City or County at the time of the book’s publication (1947).

The following are some of the sources we are currently indexing that will be added to the online Genealogy and Local History Index as they're completed:

1. St. Louis Pageant and Masque registration cards.

In 1914, more than 2,000 individuals filled out these cards titled "Sons and Daughters of St. Louis: A Roll of St. Louisans for the Historical Records of the Pageant." The cards include the individual's name, birth date, place of birth, present address, present occupation, and parents' names and place of birth.

2. The Guardian (yearbook of the Homer G. Phillips School of Nursing),
1956.

Contains photographs of African American nursing students.

3. Echo (Webster Groves High School yearbook), 1931 and 1932.

Contains photographs of students and faculty.

4. St. Louis County justice of the peace marriage registers (two
volumes), 1839-1853 and 1867-1874
.

5. Membership cards of the Aubuchon-Dennison Post of the American Legion.

Cards of veterans from World War I through the Persian Gulf War. Cards usually contain the applicant’s name, serial number, residential address, date and place of entry into service, date and place of honorable discharge, branch and unit of service, applicant’s signature, occupation, various grades held during World War, birthplace and birth date, name and address of nearest relative, and relationship of this person to the applicant.

6. Overseas with an Aero Squadron, by Clarence F. Piesbergen.

Contains brief and often humorous notes regarding members of the 86th Aero Squadron during World War I. Includes photographs of some squadron members.

7. Weekly reports of the mortality among the soldiers in the military hospitals and camps of St. Louis, circa 1862-1865 (published in the Missouri Republican newspaper).

Entries in these reports usually include the soldier's name, company, regiment, cause of death, and date of death. Also includes prisoners.

8. The Echo (St. John the Baptist High School student newspaper),
1941-1951 (incomplete run).

Includes articles about students at the high school. Includes some photographs of students.

Dennis Northcott

Tuesday, February 03, 2009

A HISTORY OF STANTON, MISSOURI

WHERE DEAD MEN STILL FIGHT: A HISTORY OF STANTON, MISSOURI
by Sue Blesi

402 pages • 8” x 10” • 450 photographs • maps • $32.99 plus tax

Chapters Include:

Early History of the Community: who were the pioneer settlers?
The Post Office: a history of Stanton mail service
Pick and Shovel: mining in the greater Stanton area
How Much Government: city officials, township officials, elections and more
Meeting Spiritual Needs: churches in the community
The Three R's: schools that served the community
Rails and Trails: transportation history
The Mother Road: The Route 66 - Interstate 44 era
Stalactites and Stalagmites: Meramec Caverns
The Missouri Kid: Stanton native was subject of nationwide manhunt
The Wild West: guns, fights, and stills
Hodgepodge: miscellaneous tidbits from the past
Anaconda, Dry Branch and Morrellton: the town that had three names at the same time
United We Stand: Stanton's involvement in the Civil War and World War I
People Were and Are the Community: who lived at Stanton?
Crossing Jordan: burials in the Anaconda, Stanton, Rock Hill and Hendrix cemeteries

BOOK SIGNINGS TO BE HELD AS FOLLOWS:
Friday, Feb. 6 from 5 - 7 p.m. Du Kum Inn, Sullivan
Saturday, Feb. 7 from 8:30 a.m. - 12 noon. White Rose, Union
Friday, Feb. 13 from 7 - 9 a.m. Cowans, Washington
Friday, Feb. 13 from 5 - 7 p.m. Lewis Cafe, St. Clair

If you are not able to attend and would like a book, contact Sue Blesi at 573-927-2772 or email franklincountyhistory@msn.com

We might be able to meet you someplace in Franklin County, contingent upon our schedule.

Also available by mail from:

Missouri Kid Press
P. O. Box 111
Stanton, Missouri 63079

$32.99

Missouri residents add sales tax of $1.88 for total of $34.88

For mail orders, please add $4.00 for shipping within United States

Please make checks out to Missouri Kid Press

Please pass the word to anyone you think might be interested. Thanks!

EBOOKHOOD

As they say, your neighborhood for e-books (and a place to convert text files into e-books):

LINK

CUSTOMIZABLE SEARCH ENGINES

It’s easy to offer a customized search on your personal, society, or institution website. This article shows you three ways to do it:

LINK

CIVIL WAR SHOWS

I live in the Midwest, and generally like it fine here, but there is a reason I would love to live in the South: Civil War shows! These shows of Civil War collectibles are very popular in the South, and I would faithfully attend any shows within reasonable driving distance. Here’s a list of upcoming shows for those of you who live in the South (or have the wherewithal to travel there at the drop of a kepi):

Dalton, GA-- Northwest Georgia Trade Center
Chickamauga Civil War Show and Sale
February 7-8, 2009; Sat 9-5; Sun 9-3
Over 400 tables; more info 770-630-7296 or http://www.mikekentshows.net

Southaven, MS-- Southaven Arena
Mid-South Civil War and Antique Military Show
February 21-22, 2009; Sat 9-5; Sun 9-4

Note: I love the Chickamauga Battlefield and Visitor Center-- I’ve been there twice already-- and would gladly attend the Dalton Show if my schedule permitted…

NEW BOOK FOR ILLINOIS RESEARCHERS

Now available at Lulu.com:

Illinois Central: a Guide to Genealogical Research in Springfield, Illinois
by Thomas A. Pearson

This book is a detailed guide to materials of potential interest to genealogists in libraries, archives, and various government offices in Springfield, Illinois. The book describes the types of materials held by the library, archive, or government office; their procedure for making postal / electronic / phone requests; and contact information, location, and hours of operation for that library, archive, or government office.

A 11-page preview of the book that provides Table of Contents and a sample chapter is available on the Lulu.com website:

http://www.lulu.com/

Type "Illinois Central" in the search box and click Go.

Perfect bound; 150 pages; Illinois genealogy chronology; index.
Cost per book is $19.95 plus shipping.

About the author:

Tom Pearson is a reference librarian who has worked with genealogists and historians since 1989. He is an Air Force veteran, and a graduate of Eureka College, Eureka, IL (B.A in History) and the University of Illinois (M.S in Library Science). Tom is editor or co-editor of three newsletters: St. Clair County (IL) Genealogical Society Newsletter; "Show Me" State Genealogical Society News; and Gateway Family Historian. He is also editor of MoSGA Messenger, the Official Blog of the Missouri State Genealogical Association.

Tom has been providing talks on genealogy and military history since 1997 for libraries, genealogical societies, and lineage and patriotic societies. He was a featured speaker at the St. Louis Genealogical Society Annual Fair in 2007 and 2008, and will be a featured speaker at the Missouri State Genealogical Association Annual Conference in August 2009.

Tom lives in St. Louis, Missouri. He can be contacted at 89ilguy@gmail.com.