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MoSGA Messenger, The Official Blog of the Missouri State Genealogical Association
Serving Missouri ancestor seekers since 7 November 2007

Tom Pearson, Editor

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Saturday, August 30, 2008

PLANNING YOUR GENEALOGY STAYCATION

A staycation is a vacation that jaw-dropping gas prices / draconian airport security measures / other factors force you to spend at or near your home. George G. Morgan has some tips for getting the most out of a genealogy staycation:

LINK

PARDON ME, M'AM-- ARE THEY REAL?

Real U.S. currency, that is? Find out at the U.S. Secret Service website, How to Detect Counterfeit Money:

LINK

WHAT IF THE MANHATTAN PROJECT HAD FAILED?

Article by Mark Grimsley on the Blog Them Out of the Stone Age blog:

LINK

DISCOVER YOUR ROOTS CONFERENCE 2008

The Discover Your Roots– African American Family History Conference committee is pleased to extend a special invitation to educators to its second annual conference September 6, 2008. Educators can attend (support materials and lunch not included) for FREE or pay a reduced registration fee of $15.00 (regular $25) for materials and lunch. Educators can register by calling (314) 993-0420 and indicating special registration code: “Educator” and provide their contact information. Someone will be contacting them to confirm their registration.

This is a wonderful opportunity to learn how we can encourage the research and storytelling of the black family.

The conference is supported by:

 Afro-American Historical Genealogical Society (AAHGS) Landon Cheek Chapter
 Community Education, Division of St. Louis Public Schools
 St. Louis Public Library
 St. Louis Genealogical Society
 The Blackworld History Museum
 St. Louis County Library
 Missouri State Archives
 Missouri History Museum
 The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
 Dred Scott Heritage Foundation
 Greenwood Cemetery
 St. Clair County Genealogical Society
 St. Louis Genealogical Society, African American Special Interest Group (AA-SIG)

More details about the conference can be found at: www.DiscoverYourRootsMO.com

Thank you,
Dana King, Chair
Discover Your Roots
314-652-8991 or 314-276-1129

ANCESTRY.COM CLASSES AT FGS CONFERENCE 2008

List of classes about Ancestry products and services taught by Ancestry product experts:

LINK

PROPOSED GETTYSBURG NMP FEE CHANGES

National Park Service and Gettysburg Foundation proposal to amend the fee structure at the Gettysburg National Military Park Museum and Visitor Center, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania:

LINK

Friday, August 29, 2008

EMAIL SCAMS

Learn to recognize them and thus hopefully not fall victim to them:

LINK

NOTE: The best and simplest advice is still this:
1. if it sounds too good to be true, IT’S A SCAM;
2. if an email says you need to send confidential information (birth date, Social Security number, credit card numbers, account passwords, etc.) in an email reply to the sender, IT’S A SCAM!

U.S. PASSPORT CARD

If you’re planning travel to Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean, or Bermuda, don’t currently hold a passport, and are going to travel by land and / or sea only (not valid for air travel), you can get a passport card rather than a traditional passport book. Why do so? It costs about half what a passport book costs, is why:

LINK

NOTES: 1. If you already hold a traditional passport book, you can renew as a passport card for $20!
2. If you are contemplating travel by air to a foreign country in the next ten years, you may wish to go ahead and get the passport book.

GRANITE IN MY BLOOD

A new blog of possible interest:

“This blog will serve as a shared resource for those who are interested in gravestone photography, genealogy and family history. Most of the photographs will be of my ancestors or of cemeteries I am photographing, transcribing and researching.”

The blogger is based in Massachusetts.

LINK

ARMY TURNS TO PIXIE DUST TO AID WOUNDED SOLDIERS

Researchers Work Toward Regenerating Lost Extremities
by Elaine Wilson
Special to American Forces Press Service

FORT SAM HOUSTON, Texas, Aug. 28, 2008 - A powder that re-grows fingers and toes sounds like the stuff of fairy tales, but medical experts here are hoping they can use it to make magic happen for wounded warriors. Doctors from the U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research are trying a regenerative medicine powder that's already approved by the Food and Drug Administration in hopes of stimulating tissue growth in soldiers with missing extremities. "The powder is FDA approved and is already being used for hernia repairs and other applications," said Dr. Steven Wolf, chief and task area manager of clinical trials at ISR. "But it has never been used for this reason in people."

ISR researchers are working with Steve Badylak at the Pittsburgh Tissue Engineering Initiative, whom they found while seeking medical innovations that could benefit wounded warriors. They were particularly interested in medical advances that could aid in combating the loss of extremities, which is a "common problem" on today's battlefield, Wolf said. "This is a topic the Army and Department of Defense are interested in, because when injuries happen in war, most of them are extremity injuries," the doctor said. "With burns in particular, we commonly end up with loss of digits."

Based on studies, ISR doctors were intrigued by what they nicknamed "pixie dust," and the idea of a new application for an existing innovation. "Since the powder was FDA approved and safe for use, we figured we would try it," Wolf said. "The idea was out there that it might work for this application, but it had never been tried on humans." The "pixie dust" is far from magic. It is derived from pig bladder. To create what Wolf refers to as extracellular matrix, scientists take a mix of protein and connective tissue, "spin" it to remove the cells, and then mash the remaining material into a powder. "When put onto open wound, it seems the body starts to re-grow normal tissue," Wolf said.

The theory is that when the powder is applied, circulating stem cells see the matrix, stop and differentiate into whatever they are near, Wolf said. For instance, if by a bone, then the cells become bone; if by a blood vessel, then t hey become a blood vessel; or if by a nerve, they become a nerve. In other words, the regenerative medicine powder acts as a stop sign for stem cells, which are undifferentiated cells everyone has circulating throughout their blood stream. Wolf likens the concept to re-growth of a severed tail in a salamander. "You pull a tail off a salamander, and it re-grows," Wolf said. "The end of the tail forms what is called a blastema, and that blastema elongates. We think that's what happens when we put this powder on. "This process of growing your fingers has happened to you before, in your mother's womb," Wolf said. "The code is there, the DNA is there. What we're trying to do is trick your body into doing that again."

Application of the powder involves surgery to open the wound and apply it, a procedure that can be done in conjunction with an already scheduled surgery. Other than the normal risks of surgery, Wolf said, trials of the powder are practically harmless. "If it doesn't work, there is no downside," Wolf said. "That's why we're testing it on fingers vs. legs. If we apply it to a leg amputee, the downside is the soldier won't be able to walk for several months, and it may not work."

So far, doctors have applied the powder to two soldiers with missing fingers. "The first time, we saw an increase in length of the finger, but the wound closed before further growth could occur," Wolf said. "The other case is too soon to tell." Wolf emphasized the concept is referred to as an innovative surgical technique. "It's not a sure thing," he said. "It's a possibility." However, "We're hoping for increased length with bone support," Wolf said. "But we're not sure how long it will take or if it will even work." The odds may be high, but Wolf is hoping to take a complex scientific innovation and yield magical results for improvised explosive device victims and other wounded warriors. "If we have a soldier who was blown up by an IED and missing fingers, and we have a chance to give him his fingers back, increase his function, how can we not try?" he said. (Elaine Wilson works in the Fort Sam Houston Public Affairs Office.)

This service is provided to you at no charge by U.S. Department of Defense. Visit us on the web at http://www.defenselink.mil/.

ISGS FALL CONFERENCE 2008

Illinois State Genealogical Society
Fall Conference
October 18, 2008
Elgin, Illinois

We are celebrating our 40th anniversary!

Lodging • Anniversary Quilt

• Conference Motels - Make your reservations today!

Comfort Suites - 2480 Bushwood Dr., Elgin, IL 60124
Call them direct at 847-836-9500 before September 17 for special conference rates. Mention the conference.

Country Inn and Suites - 2270 Point Blvd., Elgin, IL 60123
Call them direct at 847-426-6400 before October 3 for special conference rates. Mention the conference.

The 2008 Anniversary Quilt - Buy a raffle ticket today!

The quilt "Windows on the Past" celebrates the founding of the Illinois State Genealogical Society 40 years ago.

Oriene Morrow Springstroh, Aurora, IL, machine pieced and Julie Karlak, Bolingbrook, IL, machine quilted the masterpiece. It is based on a Blue Underground pattern designed by Amy Walsh entitled "In and Out."

View the quilt! http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ilsgs/fallconf/quilt.html

Register today! Get the Early Bird rate!

Register online using MasterCard, Visa, Discover, American Express, a PayPal account or print a registration form: www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ilsgs/

Any questions: isgsconference@sbcglobal.net

BATTLE OF WENTZVILLE, MISSOURI

Re-enactment in Rotary Park in Wentzville on 6-7 September 2008. Events include Rummage Sale, Ladies’ Tea, Medical Demonstration, Infantry, Artillery, and Cavalry Drill, and battles each day at 2 PM. Victorian Period Ball on 6 September at 7:30 PM.

LINK

Thursday, August 28, 2008

CIVIL WAR BOOK REVIEW

Their Summer 2008 issue is now online:

LINK

GOOD NEWS FROM TENNESSEE

Good news for persons with ancestors from Roane County, Tennessee:

LINK

MAP GUIDE TO GERMAN PARISH REGISTERS

If you have ancestors from Baden, Germany this may be news you’ve been waiting for:

“The Baden Map Guide is back in print in a new Second Edition!

This Grandduchy of Baden - Map Guide to German Parish Registers volume contains detailed information about where to locate the church and parish records where the town residents went to church in Baden. Additional information is also included about other religions that might have been present. The Baden - Second Edition volume is made up of over 2,226 places and the book has a total of 291 pages.”

LINK

GENEALOGY GETS MORE PRECISE

With genetic testing, of course-- Technology Review article available full-text online:

LINK

JAMES MADISON’S AFRICAN-AMERICAN DESCENDANTS ?

Actually, nobody knows for certain if President Madison had black descendants-- and how does one prove it one way or another when known Madison descendants have elected not to submit to genetic testing?

LINK

RECORDS OF THE PROVOST MARSHAL

Access to Some Records in RG 110 Temporarily Unavailable

On August 11, 2008, access to some entries within RG 110 (Records of the Provost Marshal General's Bureau [Civil War]) will temporarily close.

The records will be relocated from the National Archives Building in Washington, DC, to NARA's regional locations for availability with federal records of states within those regions. The records will reopen for public access at the regional locations on December 8, 2008. The following entries in Record Group 110 (Records of the Provost Marshal General's Bureau [Civil War]) are closed to public access beginning August 11, 2008, and will reopen on December 8, 2008, at the locations listed below:

NARA at Boston (Waltham), MA
Maine (1861-1867), entries 380 through 611
New Hampshire (1861-1866), entries 612 through 734
Vermont (1861-1866), entries 735 through 789
Massachusetts (1861-1867), entries 790 through 1036
Connecticut and Rhode Island (1861-1866), entries 1038 through 1359

NARA at New York City, NY
New York (1861-1868), entries 1360 through 2520
New Jersey and Pennsylvania Consolidated Records (1864-1868), entries 2521 through 2537
New Jersey (1861-1868), entries 2538 through 2701

NARA at Philadelphia, PA
Pennsylvania (1861-1868), entries 2702 through 3621
Delaware and Maryland (1861-1866), entries 3622 through 3819
West Virginia (1862-1866), entries 3872 through 3960

NARA at Atlanta, GA
Kentucky (1861-1868), entries 3961 through 4162
Tennessee (1862-1868), entries 6805 through 6825

NARA at Kansas City, MO
Missouri (1861-1869), entries 4163 through 4446
Iowa (1861-1867), entries 6354 through 6499
Kansas and Nebraska (1861-1867), entries 6500 through 6571

NARA at Chicago, IL
Ohio (1861-1868), entries 4447 through 5054
Indiana (1861-1867), entries 5055 through 5357
Illinois (1861-1867), entries 5358 through 5892
Michigan (1861-1867), entries 5893 through 6102
Wisconsin (1861-1867), entries 6103 through 6353
Minnesota (1861-1867), entries 6581 through 6699

LINK

FREE CENSUS WORKSHOPS

They're talking recent censuses, and demographic info, but I thought some MoSGA members may be interested:

October 1, 2008 - 10a.m. or 2p.m.
Missouri Southern State University
Plaster Hall, room 303

Workshops cover: 2000 Census of Population and Housing, 2007 American Community Survey, and 2002 Economic Census

This 3-hour workshop will teach you how to access data from the 2000 Census of Population and Housing from the Census Bureau's American Factfinder webpage, the new 2007 data from the American Community Survey webpage, Population Estimates and Populations Projection data, the Economic Census, and other Census Bureau data. We will focus on data and maps that feature Joplin, Missouri. http://www.census.gov

This workshop will teach you how to:

* Gather 100% of the Census data and maps for the area around your home or business street address
* Gather economic data for your zip code or county or metropolitan area
* Locate current data for the major Leading Economic Indicators
* Profile major industries of each Missouri county
* Access 2007 data for all cities and counties in Missouri with a population of 65,000 or more
* Find Employer and Non-Employer data for Missouri
* Find online press releases about newly-available Census data
* Find the number of school-age children living in families in poverty in Missouri
* Find the number of Missourians without health insurance and the number of school-age children without insurance

Both workshops are alike in content. Registration is not required.

If you have any questions about the contents of this workshop, contact:

Steve Beleu
Director, Oklahoma State Data Center Coordinating Agency
405-521-2502

Mr. Beleu has been presenting Census workshops since 2003 in Oklahoma, Kansas, Arkansas, and Texas.


Submitted by:
Wendy McGrane
Library Director
Missouri Southern State University
George A. Spiva Library
3950 E. Newman Rd
Joplin, MO 64801
www.mssu.edu/spivalib
417-625-9801 phone

Wednesday, August 27, 2008

PLAT BOOKS OF MISSOURI (1930)

“This is a collection of 111 Missouri County plat books published by W.W. Hickson, and Co. in 1930 and held in the Special Collections Department of Ellis Library at the University of Missouri-Columbia. They are frequently consulted and in an effort to make them more accessible and also to preserve them, they were scanned and are now easily available for the public-at-large.”

LINK

DIGITAL IMAGE RESOURCES ON THE “DEEP WEB”

Article that lists some of the digital image collections maintained by archives, libraries, and academic institutions that don’t show up in Google or Flickr image searches:

LINK

STATE DIGITAL RESOURCES

“The Library of Congress American Memory project and other digital initiatives provide free access through the Internet to the treasures of the Library’s collections that document America’s history, culture, and creativity. Across the country, the archives, cultural institutions, museums, and libraries of many states are collaborating to create similar projects. They provide unprecedented access to materials that document local and regional growth and development as well as a look at the cultures and traditions that have made individual states and communities unique. The following is a compilation of state and regional digital projects and collaborations identified thus far. For each project, the primary institution or institutions overseeing the project are noted. The list will expand as new projects become available.”

LINK

SAMSOFT PRINTSCREEN

A free screen capture utility (520 k) for Windows XP /Vista:

"Samsoft PrintScreen is a small and convenient program for taking screenshots. It can succeed where where other programs fail taking screenshots of video, DIRECTX and OpenGL games and active window animation. Options include: take screenshot and open Paint to edit/save it; take screenshot using a hot-key; open folder containg saved screenshots. The program is accessible in three languages English, Russian and Ukrainian and needs no installation."

LINK

NOTE: Please remember to check ANY downloaded material with your computer security software before installing on your computer. Better safe than sorry!

FAMILY HISTORY MONTH AT BELLEVILLE (IL) PUBLIC LIBRARY

Celebrate Family History Month - Attend the Lecture Series

Sponsored by:

Belleville Public Library, St. Clair County Genealogical Society, and St. Louis Public Library

Lecture 1: Saturday, October 4th, 2008, 1:00pm

Discover How to Research Your Family History

As with most pursuits, there is a "right way" and many "wrong ways" to conduct genealogical research. A member of the St. Louis Genealogical Society will de liver a lecture presentation on how to get started researching your family history.

Lecture 2: Friday, October 10th, 2008, 2:00pm

Primary Sources from the Library of Congress

Amy Wilkinson from Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville will discuss the wide range of digitized primary sources accessible on the Library of Congress' website.

Lecture 3: Saturday, October 18th, 2008, 1:00pm

Publishing Grandma's Story

Jill Wagenblast tape-recorded her grandmother's account of her own life, edited the first person narrative and printed copies for family members. Now she's at work on a similar book about her late father. She'll provide an overview of her processes, especially the format for publication, and ideas about gathering family informa tion.

Lecture 4: Thursday, October 23rd, 2008, 2:00pm

Not Just for Obits Anymore: Mining Newspapers for Genealogical Nuggets

Tom Pearson, Special Collections Librarian at the St. Louis Public Library, will show how to extract every possible bit of genealogical information from newspapers. Find out wh at to look for in newspapers of different time periods and types, and how to discover newspapers of interest online and in libraries and archives.

All Lectures Held at the Belleville Public Library Conference Room (Lower Level)
121 East Washington Street, Belleville, Illinois
(Elevator Access)

Attendance Is Free But You Must Pre-Register As Seating Is Limited

To Register:
Please call the Belleville Public Library
(618) 234-0441 ext. 22
Ask for Ms. Dana Prusacki, Archivist

Tuesday, August 26, 2008

WINDOWS MARKETPLACE

Windows Marketplace is a part of the Microsoft website in which they list programs available for the various Windows operating systems-- and there are thousands of free programs listed!

LINK

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

The Missouri State Genealogical Association is calling for lecture proposals in preparation for its 2009 Annual Conference, August 7-8, 2009, to be held at the Capitol Plaza Hotel in Jefferson City, Missouri. Lectures should be approximately 50 minutes in length. Speakers will be compensated $100 per lecture and will receive a full registration to the conference, which includes the Friday night banquet and Saturday luncheon. Two-hour workshop proposals will also be considered. Compensation for each workshop will be $200 plus a full conference registration, which includes the Friday night banquet and Saturday luncheon.

Proposals may be sent by email to mosga@mosga.org or mailed to: Conference Proposal, Missouri State Genealogical Association, P.O. Box 833, Columbia, Missouri 65205-0833, and must be postmarked by December 15, 2008.

Submitted by Janice Schultz, Conference Chair

MoSGA CONFERENCE 2009

Announcing MoSGA's 2009 Annual Conference!

August 7-8, 2009
Capitol Plaza Hotel
Jefferson City, Missouri

Featured Speaker: Julie Miller, CGSM

Julie Miller is a Certified Genealogist with more than 30 years of genealogy experience. She is a newspaper columnist for the Broomfield Enterprise and is on the Board of Directors for the Nation al Genealogical Society, Association of Professional Genealogists, and International Society of Family History Writers and Editors. Ms. Miller is the President of the Colorado Chapter of the Association of Professional Genealogists and Past President of the Colorado Genealogical Society.

Registration information forthcoming:
http://www.mosga.org

Monday, August 25, 2008

CAPTURE OF WASHINGTON BY THE BRITISH, AUGUST 1814

Online document at Today’s Document from the National Archives website:

LINK

ONE HUMP OR TWO?

Could camels have replaced the vanishing buffalo as a source of livelihood for some American Indian tribes? One U.S. senator thought so:

LINK

BALLTOWN CEMETERY REHAB

Every once in a while a community volunteer comes along and donates time and funds beyond all expectations to accomplish a project for the benefit of the community, and the significance of the project is such that words cannot adequately describe it. Robert Seater, graduate of Metz High School and a retired U.S. Naval officer, has personally undertaken the complete renovation of Balltown Cemetery near Metz, with the assistance of Tex McKinley, as his assistant. In addition to trimming trees and removing overgrown bushes, he is repairing broken stones and straightening those which have tipped over the years. And much more...

A newspaper article which really just touches on the magnitude of this project has recently been posted at "Balltown Cemetery Rehab is a Labor of Love." Five web pages of before and after pictures have recently been added to help show the marvelous work being done. Please note that there will be a public ceremony this fall, November 11, Veterans Day, to dedicate the new military memorial and rededicate the G.A.R. memorial -- mark your calendar now to attend.

Robert estimates it may take about five additional years to complete the remaining planned work which includes installing an engraved marker with the cemetery's history (Balltown is Vernon County's oldest cemetery) as well as repairing and leveling gravestones in the north section which is the older part of the cemetery.

Regards,

Nancy Thompson
Tri-County Genealogical Society
218 West Walnut St, Nevada, MO 64772
email: tricountygenealogy@centurytel.net website: http://www.rootsweb.com/~motcogs/

P.S. for those with dial-up internet service, the file size for the newspaper story is 43KB and the pictures range from 322 to 606KB. Adobe Reader v. 6 or higher is required to view the picture pages.

OGS FALL CONFERENCE

"Paths To The Past," the Ozarks Genealogical Society's 28th Annual Fall Conference, will be held September 12 & 13 at University Plaza Hotel, Springfield Missouri.

Lloyd deWitt Bockstruck will be the featured speaker. Mini sessions, vendors, lunch, door prizes and a source book are included. Discount for early registration (by August 30).

New this year: Friday night only registration!

More information available at http://ozarksgs.org, by e-mail, ogsoc@sbcglobal.net or call 417-885-9009.

Doris Wilson, President
Ozarks Genealogical Society, Inc.

Sunday, August 24, 2008

POSTGRADUATE STUDY IN GENEALOGY

The University of Strathclyde (Glasgow, Scotland) announces that it will be offering postgraduate certificates and diplomas in Genealogical Studies. The certificate focuses mainly on British records and methodology; the more detailed diploma program also includes study of overseas records and methodology. Can’t drop everything and move to Scotland? Then enroll in the online versions of these programs:

LINK

GENETIC MAP OF EUROPE

Biologists are reporting that they have constructed a genetic map of Europe that should make it possible to create a test that will tell researchers which European country a person’s ancestors are probably from. Full story in the International Herald Tribune:

LINK

1916 CENSUS OF CANADA

Dick Eastman is reporting that the 1916 Census of the Western Provinces (Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta) is now available on microfilm at Library and Archives Canada. The film is available for Interlibrary Loan, but the material has not as yet been digitized:

LINK

Wednesday, August 13, 2008

15 WAYS LOCAL LIBRARIES CAN HELP THE GENEALOGIST

Article by Janice Nickerson in Discovering Family History (July-August 2008): 25-26.

GET THE MOST OUT OF FAMILYSEARCH.ORG

Leslie Albrecht shows you how to get the most out of this great online resource in Discovering Family History (July-August 2008): 20-22.

MASTER THE SSDI

Learn all about the Social Security Death Index in an article by Donna Potter in Discovering Family History (July-August 2008): 11-12. Janice Nickerson explains how to search for burial information in a second article about your dear departeds (pp. 8-10).

NOTE: Discovering Family History is a new genealogical publication that should prove of interest to many members of MoSGA. Look for it in your favorite bookstore, or ask your local public librarian to add it to their subscription list!

Tuesday, August 12, 2008

FREE FITNESS CHARTS, PLANS, & TECH TOOLS

Maybe we can't live forever, but we can try to be in great shape the entire time we're here, and Lifehacker wants to help us be all that we can be:

Fitness charts: LINK

Fitness plans and tech tools: LINK

PERSISTANCE OF MEMORY: SUSTAINING DIGITAL COLLECTIONS

Conference to be held at the InterContinental Chicago Hotel on 9-10 December 2008. National experts will provide information about life-cycle management of digital collections: how should such collections be stored, how long can items in certain formats be expected to last, etc. More info at:

LINK

You can also request a conference brochure from Julie Martin.

NATIONAL ARCHIVES OF SOUTH AFRICA

Have relatives who came from / immigrated to South Africa? Then you’ll want to check out the website of the National Archives of South Africa:

LINK

MISSING PERSONNEL OFFICE

The Department of Defense maintains a Missing Personnel (POW / MIA) website that includes lists of MIAs from World War II to the present-day:

LINK

Monday, August 11, 2008

A FRIEND IN NEED...

I am hoping you will be able to assist me in my effort. I have a dear, dear friend in Alaska by the name of Patricia Nolan. Her address is 4810 Malibu Road, Anchorage, Alaska 99517-3274. She is a descendent of George and Julia Ann (Herndon) Fenwick family of Cooper/Saline Co., Mo and James Patrick and Elizabeth (Pilson) Murphy family of Lincoln Co., Mo.

She developed breast cancer about 3 years ago and underwent surgery and radiation therapy. About 6 months ago she developed excruciating pain in her back and was ultimately diagnosed with bone cancer secondary to the breast cancer. After 160 radiation treatments it has progressed to her lungs and soon liver. The prognosis is not good-- 2-4 months if we are lucky.

Her biggest worry is not death, but finishing her genealogy for her two children and her two brothers and sister. We are all typing our fingers off, photoshopping pictures, cropping, and scrapbooking to help see her work completed.

If any of your members are Fenwicks/Murphys, or are related to the Fenwick or Murphy families, I would like them to drop her a line. Introduce yourself, tell her how you might be connected, and generally give her something to look forward to. I am hoping these letters will help keep her spirits up and add some desperately needed quality to her life.

If you can put the word out, I would sincerely appreciate your effort.

Margaret Gauntt

KEEPING YOURSELF SAFE ON THE INTERNET

Title of a very informative article by Ilene Kanfer Murray in St. Louis Genealogical Society Quarterly 41:1 (Spring 2008): 13-14. If you need a good intro to this subject, this is a great place to start!

TIED TO A TREE AND SHOT

An article about the author’s quest to determine if a family “legend” was actually a true story- in this case, it was! Full story in St. Louis Genealogical Society Quarterly 41:1 (Spring 2008): 29-31.

NOTE: Anybody else find it amusing that an article entitled “Tied to a Tree and Shot” was written by a lady named Peggy Rifleman?

THE NAKED TRUTH

There’s a statute by that name in St. Louis-- and the statute is most aptly named. An article (with b&w photos) by Michael McDermott in St. Louis Genealogical Society Quarterly 41:1 (Spring 2008): 21-23 explains why this lovely bronze lady spends her days sans attire in a St. Louis park.

NOTE: St. Louis Genealogical Society Quarterly is available at St. Louis Public Library, St. Louis County Library, and at the Midwest Genealogy Center-- or you could always join StLGS and get their great publications at home!

BOOKSIGNINGS IN ST. LOUIS

September Authors @ Your Library

September 23, 2008. Jennet Conant, author of The Irregulars: Roald Dahl and the British Spy Ring in Wartime Washington. Booksigning - yes; Books for sale - yes. 7 PM at Buder Branch Library, 4401 Hampton Avenue, St. Louis 63109.

October Authors @ Your Library

October 8, 2008. Martin Sandler, author of Lincoln Through The Lens. Booksigning - yes; Books for sale - yes. 7 PM at Central Library, 1301 Olive Street, St. Louis, MO 63103

October 15, 2008. Julius Hunter, author of TV One-on-One. Booksigning – yes; Books for sale – yes. 7 PM at Central Library, 1301 Olive Street, St. Louis, MO 63103.

October 22, 2008. Gary Ecelbarger, author of The Great Comeback: How Abraham Lincoln Beat the Odds to Win the 1860 Republican Nomination. Booksigning – yes; Books for sale – yes. 7 PM at Buder Branch Library, 4401 Hampton Avenue, St. Louis 63109.

Rachel Smith
Program Coordinator
St. Louis Public Library
1301 Olive St.
St. Louis, MO 63103
314-206-6779

Saturday, August 09, 2008

AT WILSON'S CREEK

Webster County resident George Lawson's recollections of his Civil War service, including the battles of Wilson's Creek and Pea Ridge, in an article published in the Marshfield (Mo) Mail newspaper:

LINK

JING

What is Jing? It’s a freeware screen capture program, with versions available for both Windows and Mac OS X:

LINK

NOTE: It's always best to scan downloads with your security software prior to installing on your computer. Better safe than sorry!

LONDON FAMILY HISTORY CENTRE

Website of the largest Family History Center outside the U.S. London FHC owns the largest microfilm collection of parish records in the U.K.:

LINK

EMERGENCY RADIO

If you are on the road a lot (either for business or for trips to archives, cemeteries, etc.), or you live in an area prone to visitation by flood, tornadoes, hurricanes, or wildfires, you may want to consider keeping an emergency radio in your car trunk (and possibly one in your house, too). By emergency radio, I mean one that will work either with batteries or when a family member turns a hand crank attached to the radio. Go to Amazon.com, select “Electronics,” and type “emergency radio” (without the quotes) into the search box-- you will be able to view a good selection of emergency radios at very reasonable prices:

LINK

Friday, August 08, 2008

MIDWEST GENEALOGY CENTER UPDATE

Here's contact info for the new Midwest Genealogy Center:

Midwest Genealogy Center
3440 S. Lee's Summit Road
Independence, MO 64055-1923
816-252-7228

LINK

NEW USCIS GENEALOGY PROGRAM HOMEPAGE

The new USCIS (US Citizenship & Immigration Service) Genealogy Program will become effective on August 13, 2008. The Genealogy Program is a fee-for-service program designed to provide family historians and other researchers with timely access to accurate information and good copies of historical immigration and naturalization records.

The USCIS Genealogy Program will offer two services:

Index Search: Using biographical information provided by the researcher, USCIS will search its historical immigration and naturalization record index for citations related to a specific immigrant. This index search service is limited to subjects born more than 100 years ago, or for whom the requester can provide proof of death. Search results (record citations) will be returned to the researcher, along with instructions on how to request the file(s) from USCIS or the National Archives.

Record Copy Request: Researchers with valid record citations (USCIS file numbers), gained through a USCIS Genealogy Program index search or through independent research, may request copies of historical immigration and naturalization records. Records available through the USCIS Genealogy Program are:

·Naturalization Certificate Files (C-files) from September 27, 1906 to April 1, 1956

·Alien Registration Forms from August 1, 1940 to March 31, 1944

·Visa files from July 1, 1924 to March 31, 1944

·Registry Files from March 2, 1929 to March 31, 1944

·Alien Files (A-files) numbered below 8 million (A8000000) and documents therein dated prior to May 1, 1951

Detailed information about the USCIS Genealogy Program is currently available in the published rule for the Establishment of a Genealogy Program.

The USCIS Genealogy Program cannot accept any requests until August 13, 2008. Until then, please check this page for updates and send any comments to Genealogy.USCIS@dhs.gov.
LINK

280 SLIDES

Need to create PowerPoints for a genealogy talk or a website, but don’t want to plunk down your hard-earned gas money for the pricey Microsoft program? Try 280 Slides- it’s an online application that might be all you need-- and you can use it for free:

LINK

IRISH MARINERS

If you had Irish relatives working as merchant seamen during the period 1918-1921, you’ll want to check out this index of 270,000 merchant seamen records (records cover all ranks, and usually include a photo):

LINK

USE OF LDS MICROFILM

Dear Myrtle has a post on her blog about using LDS microfilms at local Family History Centers and at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City:

LINK

MILITARY RANKS & TERMS

Nice lists of military ranks (Army, Navy, Marines, Coast Guard, and Air Force):
LINK

A huge list of military terms and acronyms:
LINK

And a list of abbreviations commonly found on military headstones:
LINK

NOTE: Thanks to Diane Auth for these links!

Thursday, August 07, 2008

FINDING OUR GERMAN ANCESTORS

The St. Louis Genealogical Society presents a full day of lectures on German Research, presented by Larry O. Jensen, teacher, author, and nationally-known lecturer. Mr. Jensen has over thirty-five years of German research experience, and completed his graduate studies in history at Brigham Young University and the University of Utah.

October 11, 2008
8:30 AM-4 PM
Viking Holiday Inn
10709 Watson Rd
Sunset Hills, MO

1. ABCs of German Genealogical Research
2. Determining Places of Origin of Emigrant Ancestors
3. Maps & Atlases
4. Sources Used in Resolving Intermediate & Advanced German Research Problems

Mr. Jensen is the author of A Genealogical Handbook of German Research, volumes I and II, and Maps of the German Empire of 1871, and writer of numerous German genealogical articles for the German Genealogical Digest.

StLGS Member before 15 September $45; Non-member before 15 September $55.

St. Louis Genealogical Society
4 Sunnen Drive, Suite 140
St. Louis, Missouri 63143
Phone: 314-647-8547 Fax: 314-647-8548
Website

ST. LOUIS GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY UPCOMING EVENTS

Date: Wednesday, 08 October 2008
Meeting Time: 7:00 p.m.
Presentation: 7:30 p.m
Topic: Digging Deeper: Using the Missouri Historical Society Archives
Speaker: Dennis Northcott


Date: Saturday, 01 November 2008
Meeting Time: 10:00 a.m.
Presentation: 10:30 a.m.
Topic: Union, Confederate or Missouri Militia?
Speaker: Mark Trout

For more info, check out their website.

OH, WAIT-- ANOTHER WEB THREAT... EVIL TWINS

If you regularly use wi-fi, you need to know about “evil twins” and how to avoid them:

LINK

YET ANOTHER WEB THREAT YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT

Cyber Security Tip ST05-016

Understanding Internationalized Domain Names

You may have been exposed to internationalized domain names (IDNs) without realizing it. While they typically do not affect your browsing activity, IDNs may give attackers an opportunity to redirect you to a malicious web page.

What are internationalized domain names?

To decrease the amount of confusion surrounding different languages, there is a standard for domain names within web browsers. Domain names are included in the URL (or web address) of web site. This standard is based on the Roman alphabet (which is used by the English language), and computers convert the various letters into numerical equivalents. This code is known as ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange). However, other languages include characters that do not translate into this code, which is why internationalized domain names were introduced. To compensate for languages that incorporate special characters (such as Spanish, French or German) or rely completely on character representation (such as Asian or Arabic languages), a new system had to be developed. In this new system, the base URL (which is usually the address for the home page) is dissected and converted into a format that is compatible with ASCII. The resulting URL (which contains the string "xn--" as well as a combination of letters and numbers) will appear in your browser's status bar. In newer versions of many browsers, it will also appear in the address bar.

What are some security concerns?

Attackers may be able to take advantage of internationalized domain names to initiate phishing attacks. Because there are certain characters that may appear to be the same but have different ASCII codes (for example, the Cyrillic "a" and the Latin "a"), an attacker may be able to "spoof" a web page URL. Instead of going to a legitimate site, you may be directed to a malicious site, which could look identical to the real one. If you submit personal or financial information while on the malicious site, the attacker could collect that information and then use and/or sell it.

How can you protect yourself?

* Type a URL instead of following a link - Typing a URL into a browser rather than clicking a link within a web page or email message will minimize your risk. By doing this, you are more likely to visit the legitimate site rather than a malicious site that substitutes similar-looking characters.

* Keep your browser up to date - Older versions of browsers made it easier for attackers to spoof URLs, but most newer browsers incorporate certain protections. Instead of displaying the URL that you "think" you are visiting, most browsers now display the converted URL with the "xn--" string.

* Check your browser's status bar - If you move your mouse over a link on a web page, the status bar of your browser will usually display the URL that the link references. If you see a URL that has an unexpected domain name (such as one with the "xn--" string mentioned above), you have likely encountered an internationalized domain name. If you were not expecting an internationalized domain name or know that the legitimate site should not need one, you may want to reconsider visiting the site. Browsers such as Mozilla and Firefox include an option in their security settings about whether to allow the status bar text to be modified. To prevent attackers from taking advantage of JavaScript to make it appear that you are on a legitimate site, you may want to make sure this option is not enabled.

Authors: Mindi McDowell, Will Dormann, Jason McCormick

Produced 2005 by US-CERT, a government organization.

Note: This tip was previously published and is being re-distributed to increase awareness.

Terms of use: LINK

This document can also be found at: LINK

For instructions on subscribing to or unsubscribing from this mailing list, go here.

IT'S OUR TREE

Build a family tree, share it online with family, and it's free and your info is kept private:

LINK

FEDERAL RESOURCES FOR EDUCATIONAL EXCELLENCE

Visit Federal Resources for Educational Excellence and you’ll find more than 1,500 teaching and learning resources contributed by dozens of federal agencies.

Check out the main topic areas and a few examples of the subjects they cover:

• Art and Music – sheet music, drawings, architecture
• Health and Physical Education – exercise, nutrition, substance abuse
• Language Arts – literature, journalism, reading
• Math – algebra, geometry, data analysis
• Science – climate change, disease, aeronautics
• World Studies – countries, languages, history
• U.S. History Topics – government, wars, famous people

LINK

From USA.gov, the U.S. government's official web portal Vol. 8, No. 8 (August 4, 2008)

BACK TO SCHOOL

As summer winds down, kids, parents, and teachers across the country are preparing for the start of another school year. Visit USA.gov’s Back to School page for a little extra help.

Here are just a few of the many available resources:

• Students can look up libraries, search for job openings, and find information about grants and fellowships.
• Parents can get information on school breakfast and lunch programs, review the vaccination schedule, and get resources on financial assistance.
• Teachers can find learning resources, statistics about the profession, and learn more about education reform.


LINK


From USA.gov, the U.S. government's official web portal Vol. 8, No. 8 (August 4, 2008)

Wednesday, August 06, 2008

STATE CENSUS RECORDS

Many researchers think that the federal government has sponsored all of the population censuses conducted since the ratification of the Constitution. While it is true that the federal population censuses were organized on a state-by-state basis, not every census conducted in a state (or smaller locality) was done at the behest of the U.S. Census Bureau. As a matter of fact, the states frequently executed population censuses of their own, oftentimes in the off years between the federal decennial censuses. Which states undertook their own censuses? Why did they do so? Where can you find the surviving records? You can learn the answers to these and other questions concerning state census records today, in Carolyn Barkley's article on the Genealogy and Family History Blog.

GRIFFITH'S VALUATION FAMILY NAME SEARCH

Did you have family in mid-19th century Ireland (1848-1864)? Then let this site do the heavy lifting for you:

LINK

UPCOMING GENIE EVENTS

Did you know that Dick Eastmans' Online Genealogy Newsletter has a great list of upcoming genie events (August 2008-October 2009 at present)? Click "Upcoming Events" in the "Navigation" section in the right-hand nav bar:

LINK

YOUR THIRD EYE

If it would be helpful to keep an eye on a situation even when you are not present, a spy cam may be just the ticket. Kim Komando covers the basics of nanny cams in a recent column:

LINK

CHECK BEACH WATER TEMPERATURES

If you’re planning a beach getaway this summer (with or without genie sidetrips in the offing), check the coastal temperatures where you’ll be surfing, swimming, or wading. It may help you decide between a wetsuit and a bathing suit!

You might also want to consider checking the beach water quality (hungry sharks aren’t the only hazard you may encounter!). Thanks to a partnership between dozens of states and communities and groups that include the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Earth 911, you can check for advisories due to high levels of bacteria and other hazards.

Site includes beaches on all three coasts (Atlantic, Pacific, & Gulf), plus AK, HI, and U.S. territories.

LINK

From USA.gov, the U.S. government's official web portal
Vol. 8, No. 8 (August 4, 2008)

Tuesday, August 05, 2008

ILLINOIS STATE GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY CONFERENCE

The 40th anniversary conference, 40 Years of Discovery - Portals to the Future, will be held at the Fox Valley University and Business Center on the campus of Elgin Community College, Elgin, IL. Date is Saturday, 18 October 2008. There is easy access off Interstate 90 on the far west side of Elgin, IL.

Featured speakers are D. Joshua Taylor, the Research Services Coordinator at the New England Historic Genealogical Society; Beau Sharbrough, Product Manager for MyFamily.com and founder of the FGS and GENTECH web sites; and Loretto Szucs, Executive Editor and Vice President of Community Relations for Ancestry.com.

Discover and evaluate new web sites, online databases and free tools on the internet. Investigate Footnote, FamilySearch and NSDAR collections.

Jump start your research with new techniques, get organized using Word tools and explore easy procedures for scanning and restoring documents.

Harness the internet with a basic or intermediate hands-on computer session presented by Lori Bessler, Outreach Coordinator for the Wisconsin Historical Society Library.

For further information go here, or email Linda here.

MIDWESTERN ROOTS 2008

We've mentioned this before-- this is your last chance!

Midwestern Roots 2008: Family History and Genealogy Conference takes place Aug. 15-16, 2008 in Indianapolis, IN., with pre-conference activities on Aug 14. The conference is presented by the Indiana Historical Society. For more information please visit our website.

FOX VALLEY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY CONFERENCE

Megan Smolenyak Smolenyak will present "Reverse Genealogy: Techniques for Finding Your Lost Loved Ones," "Find That Obituary! Online Newspaper Research," "Trace Your Roots with DNA" and "Beyond Y-DNA: Your Genetic Genealogy Options" for the Fox Valley Genealogy Society at Grace United Methodist Church, 300 East Gartner Rd., Naperville, IL.

This one-day conference takes place on Saturday, 27 September 2008.

For more information, please visit our website.

LEARNING ESSENTIALS FOR MICROSOFT OFFICE

If you're a teacher (of genealogical subjects or otherwise), you'll be interested in this free add-on to Microsoft Office (XP or Vista):

LINK

A BIG LIST OF SITES THAT TEACH YOU HOW TO DO STUFF

The name says it all, folks:

LINK

FAVORITE HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE

Lifehacker editors provide lists of their favorite hardware, software, and online applications (and enough of what's listed is freeware that reading this may save you some money):

LINK

YOU'VE DONE IT AGAIN!

Thanks, MoSGA Messenger readers- you've done it again! Thanks to you, we've now passed the 15,000 visitors mark, and just in time for our free August workshop! Here's hoping you'll be with us when we pass the 150,000 visitors mark!

Saturday, August 02, 2008

FOOD TIMELINE

Be ready when that urge to eat like a Viking hits:

Need to know when they started using a certain type of food? This timeline can help (and sometimes includes a recipe for that item):

LINK

NOTE: Time span covered is 17,000 BC-2008 AD, so the food you’re interested in is probably listed…

TRI-COUNTY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY NEWSLETTER

Hello:

The July 2008 newsletter has been posted on our website at www.rootsweb.com/~motcogs/.

A very nice reception has been planned for August 8 at 10 a.m. for volunteers who helped with the Vernon County Circuit Court Records Project -- please plan to attend. Details are in the newsletter. Refreshments will be served.

Until the Vernon County Cemetery Directory is finished, only a limited amount of new information will be added to our website.

54 persons receive our newsletter via bcc email notice to hide everyone's email address, and 25 receive it via U.S. mail. If you are unable to email the Society, please contact your internet provider so they can correct the problem.

Regards,
Nancy Thompson
Tri-County Genealogical Society
218 West Walnut St, Nevada, MO 64772
email: tricountygenealogy@centurytel.net
website: http://www.rootsweb.com/~motcogs/

THE GIFT THAT KEEPS ON GIVING...

Genealogy Bank Blog is reporting that The Genealogy Center of the Allen County Public Library (Fort Wayne, IN) has received a gift of $10 million from a charitable foundation. The grant is to be paid $1 million per year for ten years:

LINK

IMPACT CALCULATOR

Sure, the last big meteorite gave the Earth a spanking it won't soon forget 65 million years ago (although something gave Siberia a lesser but still memorable spanking just 100 years ago), but you never know when the next big VUEBO (Very Unwelcome Earthbound Object) will appear. So, just to help you get ready, Impact Calculator lets you figure out what damage would be done to our home sweet home by VUEBOs of varying size, composition, and speed:

LINK

NOTE: If you’re a natural pessimist, it might be better for your mental health if you pass on checking out this site…

THE BEIJING OLYMPICS: THE NBC GUIDE TO WHAT’S ON TAP

It’s almost time for the Big Show from Beijing, and you can figure out what’s don’t miss TV (and what’s don’t bother) on the official NBC Olympics website:

LINK

NOTE: Does anybody else think that it’s high time Olympic officials stopped allowing winning athletes to do victory laps while hoisting their countries’ flags? Draping the flag of one’s country over one’s sweat-soaked body in an act of relatively blatant self-promotion verges in my mind on disrespect of the flag, while raising the flag and singing that country’s anthem in the formal victory ceremony shows the respect warranted during display of these national emblems.

THE LADY VANISHES

Hello: The attached photo was discovered in my mother’s collection after she passed away. It is not labeled in anyway. I’ve sent it to all of my relatives, near and far, and no one has been able to identify her.

Would it be possible for you to post this photo on your blog asking if anyone knows who she is? I’m asking you because my mother’s side of the family has roots in Missouri. Family surnames are Barker, Biggers, Edge, Kinsfather, Schmitt, and Strauley.

Thank you.

Karen Bouton
Kent, Washington
253-850-2777



Can you identify this mystery lady?

Friday, August 01, 2008

HORNS OF THE BULL, PART IV

Rorke's Drift (22-23 January 1879):

22 January 1879 - Zulu reserves sent to attack Rorke's Drift.
8 AM- Lt. Chard rides toward Isandlwana to check on orders, but is warned away by mounted sentries and sees a party of Zulus moving across the Plateau in the general direction of Rorke's Drift. Chard arrives at the Drift at noon; he tells Major Spalding there but no action is taken.
2 PM- Maj. Spalding leaves to speed up relief column being sent from Helpmekaar. Lt. Chard, left in command by Spalding, watches the Buffalo River and soon sees Isandlwana survivors crossing the river and hears distant rifle fire.
2:30 PM- Two lieutenants report the defeat at Isandlwana to Chard, then ride on to Helpmekaar after warning the men at Rorke's Drift.
3 PM- Chard assumes command at the mission station as a defensive wall is built with meelie bags, biscuit boxes, and two wagons.
3:30 PM- Men return from the Drift with a water cart and tools on orders from Chard, who returns with them.
4:30 PM- Chard orders six men to guard the hospital, readies reserve ammunition, and orders men to fix bayonets. A lookout is posted on the ridgepole of the mission store.
5 PM- As the Zulu approach, local defense forces and the native contingent depart, reducing Chard's command from 350 to 139 (30 of them sick in the hospital). Work continues on the improvised wall around the station.
5:30 PM- Initial Zulu attack is from the south; is beaten back by steady rifle fire. New attack comes from west of the hospital along the thinly held northern wall. Zulus armed with rifles commence sniping from nearby hill.
6 PM- Zulu attack continues- British defenders are forced to retire into the yard, weakening the defenses of the hospital.
6:20-7:15 PM- Zulus concentrate attack on hospital; some occupants are killed in their beds, other manage to flee through hole cut in hospital wall. Hospital is on fire, but light from the fire helps British defenders track the movements of the Zulus.
7 PM-Midnight- British fend off wave after wave of Zulu attackers.

23 January 1879- 4 AM- Zulus retire from the battleground.
8 AM- Rorke's Drift defenders are relieved by column under Lord Chelmsford.

Casualties at Rorke's Drift:

The British suffered 17 men killed (15 KIA and two mortally wounded) and 10 wounded at Rorke's Drift, of the 139 men present when the battle began (19% casualty rate). A majority of the 17 dead men were killed by rifle fire (only patients in or defenders in the hospital were stabbed to death with the Ikwa). 350 or so Zulu dead were found on the field at Rorke's Drift after the battle-- many wounded warriors were borne away from the battlefield by their fellow warriors (Zulu casualty rate was at least 25%). Eleven British soldiers were awarded the Victoria Cross for their actions at Rorke's Drift, the most awarded for a single military action in British history.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Clammer, David. The Zulu War. NY: St. Martin's Press, 1973.
Edgerton, Robert B. Like Lions They Fought: the Zulu War and the Last Black Empire in South Africa. NY: Free Press, 1988.
Glover, Michael. Rorke's Drift: a Victorian Epic. Hamden, CT: Archon Books, 1975.
Greaves, Adrian. Crossing the Buffalo: the Zulu War of 1879. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2005.
Knight, Ian. Great Zulu Battles 1838-1906. London: Arms & Armour, 1998.
Morris, Donald R. The Washing of the Spears: a History of the Rise of the Zulu Nation Under Shaka and Its Fall in the Zulu War of 1879. NY: Simon & Schuster, 1986.
Snook, Mike. Like Wolves on the Fold: the Defence of Rorke's Drift. London: Greenhill, 2006.
Taylor, Stephen. Shaka's Children: a History of the Zulu People. London: HarperCollins, 1995.

IWO JIMA FLAG RAISER GETS HIS CITIZENSHIP PAPERS…

They were presented to his sister 63 years after the flag raising. U.S. Marine Corps Sergeant Michael Strank, an immigrant from Slovakia (then Czechoslovakia), died shortly after the flag raising. He was killed by an artillery shell during Iwo Jima mop-up operations. After initial burial on Iwo Jima, he was later reburied at Arlington National Cemetery.

Full story here:

LINK

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS DIGITAL COLLECTIONS

This site provides links to all of the digital materials and services that the Library of Congress makes available online:

LINK

Their Prints & Photographs Collection contains nearly one million digital images:

LINK

STEALTH ANCESTORS

If you’ve got ancestors who somehow “slipped below the radar,” you’ll want to read this article on the 24/7 Family History Circle blog:

LINK

PELLUCIDAR by EDGAR RICE BURROUGHS

This post is not genealogy-related, but fellow ERB fans will definitely appreciate it-- free download of this center of the Earth tale by ERB is available at Project Gutenberg:

LINK

NOTE: Yes, I know ERB is not the best prose stylist ever, but people read his books way back when (and continue to read them) because they are FUN to read…

NOTE NO. 2: BTW, since we're talking about the center of the earth, my wife and I both saw the Journey to the Center of the Earth 3-D movie recently. It was great fun, and the 3-D effects were generally VERY well done!

KIDS: THE FUTURE OF GENEALOGY

How do we get children interested in the history of their families? Carolyn L. Barkley has some suggestions on the Genealogy and Family History.com blog:

LINK

WINDOWS VISTA-- HAVE IT YOUR WAY!

If you’d like to customize your Windows Vista graphical user interface, but are afraid to “tweak your registry,” as they say, you should take a look at ObjectDesktop from StarDock.com. It’s not freeware, but the price seems reasonable, and they say you can tweak away at your Windows Vista graphical user interface without fear of deleting / altering some essential file or line of code:

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