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MoSGA Messenger, The Official Blog of the Missouri State Genealogical Association
Serving Missouri ancestor seekers since 7 November 2007

Tom Pearson, Editor

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Saturday, April 25, 2015

REMEMBERING THE WOLF CREEK RANGERS

These men from Tama County, Iowa participated in several of the Civil War’s bloodiest battles:

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ORPHAN TRAINS

The Henry County Genealogical Society (IL) will meet Monday, April 27 at 1:30 p.m. in the Kewanee Public Library second floor meeting room. An elevator is available at the First Street entrance.

Angie Snook, Curator of the Geneseo Historical Museum, will present the program, “The Orphan Train in Henry County.”

Orphan trains carried more than 250,000 homeless children from the East Coast to the Midwest farmlands between 1854 and 1929. A large portion of them settled in Henry County and grew up on local farms in this area. Others went on to Iowa and Kansas.
There were many reasons and stories of why the children rode the orphan trains. Each is different in many ways, and yet, they all fought for the same goals – happiness and a family to love them.

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THE (ELUSIVE) CONFEDERATE CONSTITUTION

This historic document is displayed just one day per year at the University of Georgia:

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UKRAINIAN ROOTS

Nashi Predky in Somerset, NJ is all about helping persons interested in tracing their Ukrainian roots:

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Thursday, April 23, 2015

SILENT SENTINELS

They stand guard in communities North and South, reminders of the human cost of our Great Civil War:

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44th NEW YORK VOLUNTEER INFANTRY REGIMENT

Available full-view via Hathitrust:

A History of the Forty-fourth Regiment, New York Volunteer Infantry, in the Civil War, 1861-1865, by Captain Eugene Arus Nash (1911).

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REGISTER OF THE MILITARY ORDER OF THE LOYAL LEGION OF THE UNITED STATES

Available for free viewing/download via HathiTrust:

Aubin, Joshua Harris. Register of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States. Boston: Pub. under the auspices of the Commandery of the State of Massachusetts, 1906.

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THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG, 1863

Available for free viewing/download via HathiTrust:

Drake, Samuel Adams, 1833-1905. The Battle of Gettysburg, 1863. Boston: Lee and Shepard, 1898.

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Monday, April 20, 2015

A LONG & BLOODY CONFLICT: MILITARY OPERATIONS IN MISSOURI & KANSAS

Lengthy article on this subject:

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FREE BLACKS IN ANTEBELLUM ILLINOIS

Highlights of a talk to the Saline County (IL) Genealogical Society:

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HATHITRUST COLLECTIONS: THE STATE OF MAINE

Users of the HathiTrust website can compile lists of full-text digital books on a particular subject, in this case books relating in some way to the state of Maine:

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GRANT AND LEE ON FOLD3

On April 9, 1865, 150 years ago this month, Confederate general Robert E. Lee surrendered his Army of Northern Virginia to the Union’s Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House, Virginia, signaling the beginning of the end of the Civil War.

After Lee’s hold on Richmond and Petersburg broke, he hoped to take his army to meet up with Joseph E. Johnston‘s troops. But things came to a head with the Union Army as Lee neared Appomattox Court House. On April 6, he lost 8,000 men to the Federals in engagements at Sailor’s (Sayler’s) Creek. Grant, aware that Lee’s already dwindling army was now at an even further disadvantage, sent him a message suggesting surrender. Lee was not ready to surrender but did ask Grant for his terms.

Lee hoped to break through the Union troops that were blocking his army’s progression and planned a last ditch attempt for the morning of the 9th. When it became clear that this attempt would fail, Lee, having already dismissed the possibility of resorting to guerrilla warfare, arranged to meet with Grant to surrender his army.

The two generals met in a home in Appomattox Court House later that day. Lee dressed in his best, while Grant, whose baggage had gone astray some days prior, arrived in a mud-stained uniform. The terms of surrender stated that all arms, artillery, and public property (except officers’ side arms and horses) were to be turned over, and that the paroled men, both officers and enlisted, were to return to their homes and not take up arms again until properly exchanged. Grant also allowed Lee’s two requests: that the enlisted men also be permitted to keep their own horses and that rations be provided for his starving army.

The official surrender ceremony occurred a few days later, on the 12th. Though Lee’s army had surrendered, the war wasn’t over. There were still other Confederate troops in the field. But the Army of Northern Virginia had not only been the most successful of the Confederate armies, it—and Lee—had also taken on a symbolic power. So as other Confederate generals heard of Lee’s surrender, they too began to capitulate over the next month. President Andrew Johnson officially declared an end to hostilities on May 9.

Interested in learning more about Lee’s surrender or about other aspects of the Civil War? Explore Fold3’s Civil War Collection.

MoSGA CONFERENCE 2015!

Dear MoSGA members,

We are pleased to announce our Annual Conference will be held this August 7-8 in Columbia at the Stoney Creek Hotel and Conference Center, our venue the past 4 years. Our keynote speaker is Judy Russell, "The Legal Genealogist" who is nationally known for her wit and wisdom, making genealogy education FUN!



There are TWO ways to register:

1. Go to our website's Conference page. Choose "Pay Online". You will need to use a PayPal account to pay online.

2. OR, Fill out the registration form and mail to the MoSGA address listed on the brochure.

A copy of this brochure will be mailed to MoSGA members in a week or two. You are welcome to share it with friends who may want to attend as well.

Thank you and we hope you can attend. If you have already registered, thank you!

2015 Conference Committee

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

HONORS OF THE EMPIRE STATE IN THE WAR OF THE REBELLION

Available full-view via Hathitrust:

The honors of the Empire state in the war of the rebellion, by Thomas S. Townsend (1889).


HATHITRUST COLLECTIONS— AMERICAN PERIODICALS

Users of the HathiTrust website can put together lists of free full-text digitized books available via that website, like this list of 18th, 19th, and early 20th century American periodicals:

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